Thomas Goodman Duke and his Family

 

Thomas Goodman Duke lived in St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish. His associations point toward the east branch of the Cooper River, the northern boundary of the parish, as his home. It is not an obvious location for a ship’s master sailing for Jamaica out of a shipyard in Christ Church Parish.

The South Carolina Gazette reported the following Customs House Notices involving Thomas Goodman Duke:

16 Jul 1750 Duke, Thomas, Shipmaster

Ship Name: Anne & Elizabeth (Sloop) Cleared to Depart to Jamaica

 

26 Nov 1750 Duke, Thomas, Shipmaster

Ship Name: Anne & Elizabeth (Sloop) Entered in From Jamaica

Clement Lemprier of Hobcaw Point owned the Anne & Elizabeth. Clement Lemprier was, among other things, a privateer.[1] He is sometimes mistakenly identified as a Huguenot, but was in fact from the Channel Islands. At times Lempriere had partners in his merchant marine undertakings. Joseph Wragg co-owned the Neptune, a 200-ton ship, with Richard I’On, Clement Lemprier, and John Colcock, all of Charleston. The ship was taken from the French on 12 April 1745.[2] William Duke of Christ Church Parish, certainly the brother of this Thomas Goodman Duke, also sailed to Jamaica for Lempriere, and is discussed separately.

In the 1740’s Lempriere owned a shipyard at Shem Creek, in what is now Mount Pleasant.[3] Shem Creek runs from Haddrel’s Point along the south side of Christ Church Parish. Lempriere married into a complex of families united by marriage to daughters of Jacob Bond, shipbuilder. This family included Jacob Read, who witnessed the will of Joan Watkins Halliburton Duke, probated in 1771.

The family of Thomas Goodman Duke is listed in the Register of St. Thomas & St. Denis Parish, but (at least in the printed account) is incorrectly identified as that of Thomas Goodmunduke. His family is listed there as follows:[4]

 

Goodmunduke—Parents—Thomas and Susannah

               Thomas ..................................................... born Apl. 13, 1735

               Elizabeth............................................. born Jan. 27, 1736-37

               Benjamin Duke....................................... born Mch. 29, 1739

               Susannah................................................... born Dec. 18, 1741

               Mary............................................................ born June 9, 1744

 

The Annals and Parish Register of St. Thomas and St. Denis in the "Deaths and Burials" section lists Thomas Duke b. (buried) March 1, 1755.[5]

All of the Duke names in the birth section of the parish register seem to have been entered at the same time, and all reflect the “Goodmunduke” error regarding the surname. Also, these are birth dates only; there are no christening dates. At this time, the parishes of the established church were legally responsible for records within their boundaries. Recording this Duke family had to have occurred during or after 1745.

Another reference to Thomas Goodman Duke is found in the will of John Snow, [6] Berkeley County planter, which was drafted 23 March 1748. [7] John Snow and his family were from a Barnstaple, Massachusetts, family that was heavily involved in international trade. His father, Dr. Nathaniel Snow, had settled in Goose Creek Parish. Nathaniel Snow established Red Bank Plantation, on the Cooper River south of the confluence of Back River and bordered by Goose Creek on the south. He lived there until his death in 1728.[8] Snow owned land adjacent that of John Maverick “on the back river” in the late 1600’s.[9] The Back River was a tributary of the Cooper above Goose Creek that formed the boundary between Goose Creek and St. Thomas parishes.

John Snow, a son of Nathaniel Snow, Sr., lived in St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, possibly as a consequence of his marriage into a local Huguenot family. On October 4, 1720 he married Susanna Poitevin there.[10] John Snow of St. Thomas and St. Denis left to his wife, Susannah, use of their plantation during her life. To his nephew, John Snow, son of his brother Nathaniel Snow, he left the plantation at the death of his wife. There was also a legacy to his goddaughter, Susannah Laurens, daughter of Augustus Laurens (who was brother of John and James Laurens, associates of Nicholas Duke). He also mentioned Judith Laurens. The executors of his will were his wife and John Dutarque. The witnesses were Thomas Goodman Duke, James Soulegree (Solomon or Sol Legaré, who used his mark, a member of the Wappetaw Congregation), and Anthony Bonneau [III]. The will was probated in January 1752. [The will of Mrs. Anthony Bonneau III was later witnessed by John Zubly, cousin of Barbara Furster Dukes, and his wife Ann Tobler, also a cousin of Barbara Furster Dukes.[11]]

The Augustus Laurens family is shown near the Bonneau Ferry on the 1825 Mills Atlas of Charleston District, near the confluence of the east branch of the Cooper River in the northwest part of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish. It is probable that the other various parties involved in this will lived near there.

James Soulegree or Sol Legaré had purchased 500 acres of land on Wambaw Creek from Augustus Laurens,[12]suggesting that they were neighboring landowners at the time of the Snow will. In 1757 Peter Fauré, later surveyor for the Orangeburgh Township, surveyed 250 acres for John James Soulegre on the Edisto River in Colleton County.[13]

Daughters of Thomas Goodman Duke

Later, the marriages of two of Thomas’ daughters are recorded in the St. Thomas and St. Denis register.

Elizabeth Duke and Henry Simons

Henry Simons and Elizabeth Duke(s) were married January 28, 1766, in St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish.[14] Henry Simons was a son of Samuel Du Pre Simons (son of Benjamin Simons I and Mary Esther Du Pre) and his wife Elizabeth Bonneau, daughter of Anthony Bonneau.

From a John James Simons database:

Elizabeth Duke b. 27 Jan 1736/37 m. Henry Simons b. 1733 to Samuel Dupre Simons (son of Benjamin Simons I and Mary Esther DuPre) b. 19 Apr 1696 and Elizabeth Bonneau, b. 1708 to Anthoine Bonneau and Jeanne Elizabeth Videau.

Huguenot settler Benjamin Simons was granted land in St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish in 1709 and established Middleburg Plantation, today the oldest surviving house in South Carolina. In 1703 Josias Du Pré received a grant on the east branch of the Cooper River adjacent Pierre Fauré.[15] The Faurés were near the Pompion Hill Chapel location, near the Bonneau Ferry. Along with the Snow and Bonneau connections, the Simons and Du Pré connections point toward the family of Thomas Goodman Duke living near Bonneau Ferry on the east branch of the Cooper.

Mary Duke and John Frasier

John Frasier and Mary Duke, daughter of Thomas Goodman Duke, married 8 Aug 1771, also in St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish.[16] The St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish Register also shows that John Frasier and Mary Duke Frasier were parents of John Frasier, baptized 24 Nov 1774.[17]

There were several individuals named John Frasier/Fraser/Frazer in the lowcountry. One Frasier family was heavily involved in Indian trading, but the John Frasier who married Mary Duke has not been placed in this family.

The LDS IGI lists a son of John Frasier and Mary Duke Frasier, John, born in about 1774; there is no citation of a source.

In 1779 John Frasier was listed as a petit juror in the Cheraws District of South Carolina.[18]

A Fraser family has been documented in Christ Church Parish:

Series Number: L10005 

Reel:  0011 

Plat:  06009 

Date: 1763/12/10

Description: FRASER, DR. JAMES, PLAT OF LAND IN CHRIST CHURCH PARISH, BERKLEY COUNTY CONTAINING 573 ACRES, SURVEYED BY WILLIAM EVANS. (C.466)

Names  Indexed: FRASER, JAMES/EVANS, WILLIAM/GREGORIE, JAMES/HOPTON/GREGORIE, ALEXANDER/RUTLEDGE/VANDERHORST, COL./PURCELL/PARKER, CHARLES/

Locations: CHRIST CHURCH PARISH/BERKELEY COUNTY/WANDO RIVER

Type: PLAT/

Susannah Duke

Thomas’ daughter Susannah Duke apparently never married. She is listed in the Auditor General’s Accounts 1778-1780 as having made “clothsloaths” for the troops, for the sum of £147.[19] She died of a “paraletic stroke” at the age of 69 years and was buried on 13 Jan 1810 in St. Phillip’s Parish, Charleston.[20]

Benjamin Duke, Son of Thomas Goodman Duke

Benjamin Duke, son of Thomas Goodman Duke and Susanna Duke, was born 29 Mar 1739 in St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish.  He was in the Berkeley County militia, drafted November 9, 1759, and discharged January 8, 1760.[21] His unit was under the command of Capt. Benjamin Elliott, Lt. William Sanders, and Ensign Elias Vanderhorst. Sergeants were Samuel “Vernor” (who was previously an overseer for William Duke) and George Hamlin.[22]

On 12 August 1762 Thomas Watts, Benjamin Duke and Susana Duke witnesssed the will of Thomas Dearington of St. Thomas’ and St. Dennis’ Parish, Berkeley County, planter [Charleston Will Book RR 1767-1771].[23] On 24 May 1772 John Dearington married Elizabeth Simons in St. Thomas and St. Denis. Thomas Goodman Duke’s daughter married Henry Simons there.[24]

In 1783 “Mr. Benjamin Duke of the Parish of St. Thomas & St. Dennis, Planter, admr. with the will annexed of David Watts, late of the Parish of St. Thomas & St. Dennis, Shoemaker, who appointed Elizabeth Watts and Benjamin Simms, Extx. & exr. & sd. Elizabeth Watts is since dead and Benjamin Simms hath rendered his Exorship, 31 July, 1783. Sureties: Joseph Warnock of St. Thomas & St. Dennis Parish, Planter, and Frances Bonneau of Charleston, House-Carpenter.”[25]

The Watts association is derived from Benjamin Duke’s marriage to a daughter of Burtonhead Boutwell. From SCDAH, SC inventories Vol. Y p.139-145 3 Oct. 1769, Burtonhead Boutwell, Roll #ST497, it can be established that Burtonhead Boutwell’s estate, less specific bequests to son Samuel Boutwell, was divided as follows:

Lot #1 for the minor children

Lot #2 John Wats [Watts]

Lot #3 for the minor children

Lot #4 Ja’s Commander

Lot #5 for the minor children

Lot #6 Johu Walker

Lot #7 Tho’s Blackwell

Lot #8 Benj Dukes

Lot #9 Christopher Dicker

It appears that the men not having the Boutwell surname listed above, including Benjamin Duke, are sons-in-law of Burtonhead Boutwell. The three minor children are identified in the court records as Anna, Joanna, and Joseph. On 9 December 1784 Benjamin Duke witnessed the marriage of Lewis Bochet[26] (Parish of Prince George) and Rebecca Watts (Prince Frederick Parish) at the home of Mrs. Rebecca Watts of the Parish of Prince Frederick. The service was conducted by Samuel Fenner Warren, of St. James Parish, Santee. [27] Benjamin Duke served as a witness, with Joseph Boutwell. Prince George’s Parish extended from the Great Pee Dee in the north to the Santee in the south, taking in the Georgetown area. St. James Santee was created in 1705/06. By 1784 it had been reduced to the coastal area immediately south of the Santee and north of the SeeWee and Christ Church Parish.

Boutwell’s grant in 1735 was on Muddy Creek (Series: S213019 Volume - 0006 Page - 00092 Item - 00 Date: 1754/09/03 ). John “Frashier” or Fraser, probable husband of Mary Duke, also had a grant on Muddy Creek adjacent Burtonhead Boutwell (Series Number: S213184 Volume: 0015; Page: 00209; Item: 03; Date: 1773/05/27) and also on Jeffries Creek (Series Number: S111001; Volume:  0011; Page: 00210; Item: 02; Date: 1772/05/04).

A Benjamin Duke, identified as “of Craven County” was involved in a business transaction with James Commander in 1773. This involved the sale for £1000 of five slaves. The document was witnessed by John Commander and Nicholas Punch.[28]

Thomas Duke, son of Thomas and Susanna Duke

The fate of this Thomas Duke is uncertain. He may have moved to the old Clarendon or Williamsburg county areas.

 

This document is copyright © 2007 by Lynn Teague. All rights reserved. The copyright must appear on all copies.

 

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[1] The Bond Family. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. 25 (1):10.

[2] Olsberg, R. Nicholas, ed. October 1973. Ship Registers in the South Carolina Archives 1734-1780. The South Carolina Historical Magazine. Vol. 74(4):251.

[3] Coker, P.C. 1987. Charleston’s Maritime Heritage 1670-1865. Charleston: Coker Craft Press. Page 299.

[4] Clute, Robert F. 1884.The Annals and Parish Register of St. Thomas & St. Denis Parish. Charleston: St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish. Page 62.

[5] Clute, Robert F. 1884.The Annals and Parish Register of St. Thomas & St. Denis Parish. Charleston: St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish. Page 99.

[6] George Snow, eventually resident in Prince Frederick Parish, was Master of the brig Hawke, also out of Charleston (South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. VIII:42-43).

[7] South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. 73: 311.

[8] Heitzler, Michael J. 2005. Goose Creek: A Definitive History. Charleston: History Press. Pages 221-223.

[9] Salley, A. S. Jr., ed., and R. Nicholas Olsberg, rev. and introduction 1973. Warrants for Land in South Carolina 1672-1711. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press for South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[10] Clute Robert F. 1884. The Annals and Parish Register of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish. in South Carolina, from 1680 to 1884. Charleston: Parish of St. Thomas and St. Denis. Page 42.

[11] Moore, Caroline T., Ed. 1964. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina. Vol. II 1740-1760. Columbia: R. L. Bryan.

[12] Series No. S372001. Vol. 00H0 Page 00038, Date 1726-1730. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

Memorials. Series No. S111001. Vol. 0001. Page 00022. Date 1731/01/04. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[13] Colonial Plats. Series No. S213184. Vol. 0007 Page 00098. Item 03. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[14] Clute, Robert F. 1974. The Annals and Registers of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, South Carolina, 1680-1884. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company. Page 30.

[15] Childs, St. Julien. Jan-Apr 1942. The Petit-Guérard Colony. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XLIII (1-2):8-9.

[16] Clute, Robert F. 1974. The Annals and Registers of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, South Carolina, 1680-1884. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company. Page 30.

[17] Clute, Robert F. 1974. The Annals and Registers of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, South Carolina, 1680-1884. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company. Page 61.

[18] Warren, Mary B. ed. 1977. South Carolina Jury Lists, 1718-1783. Danielsville GA: Heritage Papers. Page 47,

[19] Auditor General’s Accounts 1778-80. Page 28. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[20] Pinckney, Elise, ed. 1973. Register of St. Phillip’s Church 1810 through 1822. Charleston: The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in South Carolina Page 14.

[21] Clark, Martie June. 1986. Colonial Soldiers of the South 1732-1774. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.

[22] Warren, Mary Bondurant, 1988. South Carolina Newspapers: the South Carolina Gazette 1760. Danielsville GA: Heritage Papers. Page 83.

[23] Moore, Caroline T. 1969. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1760-1784, Vol. III. Pages 80-81.

[24] Clute, Robert F. 1974. The Annals and Registers of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, South Carolina, 1680-1884. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company. Page 27.

[25] Holcomb, Brent H. 1977. Probate Records of South Carolina, Volume I: Index to Inventories 1746-1785. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 67.

[26] Henry Bochet was a publican in the Parish of St. James Santee in 1758. Webber, Mabel L. Parish Register of St. James’ Santee 1758-1788. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. XVII(1): 34.

[27] Webber, Mabel L., ed. Parish Register of St. James’, Santee 1758-1788. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine Vol. XVI:165.

[28] Volume PP, Miscellaneous Records, p. 464. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.