William Duke in Christ Church Parish

 

William Duke was certainly a brother of Thomas Goodman Duke. He was a ship’s master who lived in Christ Church Parish and sailed, like Thomas, for Clement Lemprier.

A series of Custom House Notices from the South Carolina Gazette document some of the Jamaica voyages of William Duke:

10 April 1749 Duke, William, Shipmaster

Ship Name: Tyger (Sloop) Entered in from Jamaica

 

12 June 1749 Duke, William, Shipmaster

Ship Name: Tyger (Sloop) Entered out for Jamaica

 

17 July 1749 Duke, William, Shipmaster

Ship Name: Tyger (Sloop) Cleared to Depart for Jamaica

These are accompanied by General Advertisements, also from the Gazette:

25 June, 2 July, and 9 July, 1750 Duke, William [Hobcaw, SC]

Advertised for 13 runaway slaves.

William Duke also was listed as Master of the Ann and Elizabeth, a 35-ton sloop out of Charleston, built SC 1750, registered 23 June 1750, owned by Clement Lempriere.[1] This was a ship for which Thomas Goodman Duke had served as master, a year earlier.

The marriage of William Duke and “widow Halliburton” at Hobcaw, Christ Church Parish, appears dated 13 Jan 1749 in the Christ Church Parish Register.[2] Joan Watkins had married William Haliburton in Christ Church Parish on 10 April 1743.[3] On 24 January 1743 the South Carolina Gazette indicated that William Halliburton was shipmaster of the St. George, entered in from Jamaica at Charles Towne. On 7 March 1743 he was listed as entered out for London, also in the St. George, and on 11 April 1743 he was cleared to depart to London. There is no record of his return. His death is not recorded in the Christ Church Parish register; he probably died at sea.

The Halliburtons were associated with the Snow family. In 1725 Robert Haleburton was a witness for a deed from Joseph Croskeys and Thomas Croskeys to Thomas Snow, carpenter.[4] In 1726 Robert Haleburton witnessed a deed from Nathaniel Snow, Sr., and his wife to Alexander Nisbett.[5]

The Watkins family had resided in the Charleston, SC, area for some time before Joan’s marriages. John Wattkins appeared in the Province of South Carolina in April 1692 on the ship Loyall Jamaica, a privateer vessel.[6] John Watkins was a petitioner against the Proprietors in 1716/1717, along with Richard Weekly, William Burnley, Peter Bacot (who married Marianne Dugué, widow of Jacques Dugué II), and Michael Blackwell, among many others.[7] Watkins had land on Charleston Neck and on the Wando River.[8] In 1692 John Watkins, mariner, purchased one quarter of Charleston Lot #85 from William and Ann Smith of Berkeley County.[9]

William Duke encountered numerous legal complexities, most of them related to difficulty paying bills. Various judgment roll suits were brought against William Duke, 1752-56:

Joseph Tobias[10] was identified as a Charleston shopkeeper, and on 22 January 1752 sued William Duke of Christ Church Parish, planter, for payment of a total of £854 owed against notes.[11] One was for £427 and was due January 1, 1750, at 8% interest; the names of witnesses were not legible. Andrew Rutledge was attorney for Dukes, while Charles Pinckney was attorney for Tobias.

Samuel Varnor[12] was overseer for the “plantation and Negroes” of Capt. William Duke, and sued for £100 payment through William Burrows, his attorney, on 18 Apr 1753.[13] This Samuel Varnor was presumably related to Elizabeth Varnor, who on 5 Feb 1744/45 married Capt. Clement Lemprier. In the same year and place Henry Varnor married the Widow “Guellard.” Elizabeth Varnor Lemprier died soon after her marriage; Capt. Lemprier remarried, to Ann Wilks, on 20 Dec. 1746. [14] Also, there was another Elizabeth Varnor, who married James Dawes of Christ Church Parish, a Tory. In her right he sued for 200 acres called Shemee Point in Christ Church Parish, in 1784.[15] The claim notes that Elizabeth Varnor was the oldest daughter and co-heiress of John Watkins deceased and was acknowledged as such by her sisters Joan Watkins (wife of William Duke), Ann Watkins (wife of Jonathan Fowler), and Katherine Watkins, spinster.  Colonial records show that a Henry and Elizabeth Varnor were present in the colony at least from 1736. Elizabeth Varnor witnessed the will of Elias Horry, Sr. The will mentions, among others, daughter Henrietta Bonneau.[16] Henry and Elizabeth Varnor had a son, Henry, christened 20 Jun 1747 in Christ Church Parish.

Robert Sutton of Christ Church parish, planter, in 1754 sued William Duke for a £182 debt incurred in 1753.[17] Richard Tookerman signed as witness for the note, which was drawn up “near Hobcaw.” Edgerton Leigh served as attorney for William Duke. James Wright was attorney for Sutton.

John Holmes brought a suit for debt against William Duke in 1756.[18] Holmes had purchased the Hobcaw Ferry, including a tavern, and presented an itemized account with his suit. This was a long list of charges that included numerous ferry trips to and from town for William Duke, for his spouse, for Nancy Watkins, and for a “Coby” or “Caly” Watkins. There were also charges for drinks (punch and toddy) and suppers on several occasions each with Clement Lamprier and with William Stewart.

In 1751 and in 1757 William Dukes was listed as a petit juror in Christ Church Parish. In 1757 William Dukes also was listed twice on the St. Phillips jury roles, once as a grand and once as a special juror.[19] Grand juror status required having paid at least £5 tax for the year and special juror status required paying exceptionally high taxes that year. Land was taxed very little, but equipment, merchandise, and slaves were subject to higher taxes. Ministers, attorneys, civil servants, and legislators were exempt from the jury lists. We can assume that William Duke did not fall into the exempt classes of people, and that he or they owned substantial equipment, merchandise, or slaves. It is not clear how many individuals are represented here. A single William Duke might have qualified for both jury lists, and might also be listed in other counties. An individual might be taxed and also listed for jury duty in any county in which he owned property, and everyone was subject to service in Charleston. Thus the William Dukes of St. Phillips could be the same individual as William Duke of Christ Church Parish.

In 1759, advertisements by William Duke of Christ Church Parish appeared on 22 Sep, 29 Sep, and 7 Oct in the South Carolina Gazette. These ads were concerned with auctions, land sales, rice and indigo.

William Duke brought a suit against Arthur Baxter in July 1761.[20] This involved an incident in Kingston Township, and may relate to a different William Dukes.

On 25 July and 1 and 8 August 1761, William Duke of Christ Church Parish was mentioned in general advertisements in the South Carolina Gazette by Warham & Prioleau of Charleston. This firm dealt in general merchandise.

Joan Duke’s will was probated in 1771.[21] In her will Joan Duke left her plantation and slaves to be administered in trust for her minor son John and also left a bequest for her niece, Mary Cammell, a minor. She listed two surviving sisters, Catherine Watkins and Anne Fowler, who first married James Cammell and second Jonathon Fowler. Executors for her estate were identified as Jonathon Fowler, her brother-in-law, and Cato Ash.

In the name of God Amen, I Joan Dukes of Christ Church Parish in Berkley County in the Province of South Carolina Widow do make and Ordain this may last Will and Testament in manner and form following that   That is to say First I give devise and Bequeath unto my Sister Catharine Watkins and to her Heirs and Assigns my Negro Wench Lucy and her future Issue and Increase to hold the said Negro Wench Lucy and her future Issue and Increase to her the said Catharine Watkins her Heirs and Assigns forever Also I Give devise and bequeath unto Mary Cammell the Daughter of my Sister Ann Fowler by her former husband James Cammell the annual Sum of twenty pounds Currency to be paid her Yearly and every year after my decease to be accounted from the day of my Death by my Heirs and Executors herein after named toward her Maintenance and Clothing until She shall arrive at the Age of twenty one Years of day of Marriage which shall first Happen and I do hereby Charge the Whole of my Estate Real and Personal with the payment of the said annuity of Twenty Pounds. Also I Give and Bequeath until my Son John Dukes and to his Heirs and Assigns on Condition of his Living to Come of Age or having Lawful Issue and all those my Negro Slaves named Sambo Niobe Ben Phillander Juno and Robin and their future Issue and Increase and also all the Rest and Residue of my Estate Real and Personal of what Nature or kind soever to have and to hold to him my said Son John and to his Heirs and Assigns for ever. But in Case my said Son shall die under the Age of Twenty One Years not having Lawful Issue then Living or Shall not Leave a Wife Encient of a Child that shall  be afterwards Born alive and Shall live to come of age or have Issue then and in such Case I give the said Residue of my said Estate Real and personal to my Executors herein after Named and the Survivors and Survivor of them and the Executors and administrators of such Survivor and for the Several Uses Trusts intents and purposes herein after mentioned that is to say in Trust that they will dispose of the same at publick Sale and pay and divide the amount hereof to and amongst all the Children of my Sister Ann the now Wife of Jonathan Fowler that Shall then be living equally share and share alike if more than one but if only one to that one alone to hold to such Child or Children for ever and I do hereby direct that my Executors herein after Named or such of them as shall qualify shall keep the said Residue of my Estate together and Entire and Work and employ the said Slaves on the Plantation the now are in the same manner as I have heretofore employed them to be delivered to my said Son John at his arrival at age or on failure of Such Contingency then to be Disposed of and applied in Such manner as I have herein already directed and that my Debts and funeral Charges be Defrayed out of the income of the said Residue of my said Estate and Lastly I do hereby nominate and appoint Jonathan Fowler and Cato Ash Executors of this my Last Will and Testament and the Survivor of them Guardians and guardian of the Person and Estate of my said Son during his Minority in Witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal this Fourteenth day of October in the Year of our Lord 1771.

Witnesses to the will of Joan Duke were Samuel Maverick, Ann Davis, and Jacob Read. There is no mention of William Duke other than in Joan’s description of herself as a widow; he must have died between 1761 and 1771. There is no evidence of a will left by William Duke. This suggests that there was at least one older son who inherited property belonging to him through primogeniture. If John had been his oldest son, William’s property would have gone directly to him, although Joan would have had a legal interest.  As a minor in 1771, Joan’s son John Duke would have been born after 1750 and before 1771.

Joan’s household goods and even her food supply are disposed of in her will. Samuel Maverick and John Fowler, who were qualified as executors before the Secretary, proved the will.[22] Samuel Maverick replaced Cato Ash, named in Joan’s will. Cato Ash was originally from St. Andrew’s Parish, which included James Island, but had property on King Street in Charleston.[23] Ash represented Charleston in 1775 in the Second Provincial Congress,[24] but was described as deceased in a 1777 land transaction.[25]

Samuel Maverick II, who witnessed Joan Watkins Duke’s will, had land on James Island.[26] Samuel, son of Samuel Maverick I (b. 1715) and his wife Catherine Coyer, was baptized in September 1742 on James Island, St. Andrews Parish.[27] Both Samuel Maverick I and Samuel Maverick II were shipbuilders on James Island. The younger Samuel Maverick is said to have owned 15 ocean-going ships. One Samuel Maverick was also identified as a house carpenter.[28]

Witness Jacob Read was from the family of Jacob Bond and his daughters, the ship-owning family of Christ Church Parish that also included Clement Lempriere.

The inventory of Joan Duke’s estate was prepared 13 Mar 1772 by George Ten, John Wish, and William Bennett.[29] The estate included slaves (Sambo, Mober, Ben, Jack, Cleander, Juno and her child Robin, and Lucy), 19 head of cattle, 80 bushels of corn, 30 bushels of peas, 1 chest of drawers, 6 chairs, a table, 25 head of sheep, kitchen furniture, 2 bed quilts and mattresses, table linen, 7 large and 7 small silver spoons, tea tongs, and a silver ladle, a pair of gold buttons, gold ring, a table cover, a “lott” of china and earthenware, a tea chest, a table and chairs, and a canoe. The total was valued at £2712/12/0.

At this time a William Bennett owned land in Berkeley County in what seems to have been the heart of French Santee, probably upper St. John’s Parish, near Rene Richbourgh, Maurice Simons, Peter Couturier, James Ravenel, Richard Oliver, George Hall, and William Kirk (Series: S111001 Volume - 0011 Page - 00039 Item - 05 Date: 1771/08/23).  Other SCDAH records indicate that a William Bennett also owned land on the Edisto River, near Nicholas Yon (Series: S111001 Volume - 0012 Page - 00143 Item - 05  Date: 1773/03/30 ).

A 7 Sep 1861 McCrady plat (for much earlier ownership) showed lands held by Joan Dukes (61.5 acres), Catharine Watkins (60 acres exclusive of marsh), Ann Fowler (59.5 acres exclusive of marsh) and Elizabeth [Davis struck through] Daws (50 acres exclusive of marsh).[30] Elizabeth Dawes had been Elizabeth Varnor, and was mentioned previously as an acknowledged daughter of John Watkins, Joan’s father. Landmarks mentioned are Hog Island, Hog Island Creek, and Haddrells Point.

William Duke and Arthur Baxter

A William Duke is also associated with the Pee Dee. He brought a suit against Arthur Baxter in July 1761.[31] This was not related to a debt, but to a charge that Baxter “did beat wound and evilly entreat and other enormities . . . did to the damage of the said William Duke.” The incident was alleged to have taken place 19 Nov 1759 at Kingston near little Pee Dee; Kingston was a township in the northeast of South Carolina, in modern Horry County. Baxter was said to have used “staves, fists and clubs” in his attack. Arthur Baxter obtained land on the Pee Dee in 1742/3: (Series: S372001 Volume - 00Y0 Page - 00147 Item - 00 Date: 1742-1743). Baxter also was partial owner of a ship.[32] He owned the 30-ton schooner John out of Georgetown, with George Starrat, registered Georgetown 25 May 1748. Both Baxter and Starrat were identified as planters.

William Dukes and a Pee Dee Deed

This William Dukes could be the same individual as the one who sued Arthur Baxter:

Deed Book 5, Anson County, NC p. 303:

23 July 1759. Phillip Herndon of Anson, carpenter, to Nicholas White, of same for 15 pounds proc. money . . . 320 A., 1/2 of 640 A granted to James Baber & conveyed to Herndon, on SW side of Pee Dee, granted 22 May 1741 . . .  Phillip Herndon {LS} Wit: Heza. Russ, Robt. Abraham, Wm. Dukes.

Baber’s grant is dated 1746 (Series: S213184 Volume - 0004 Page - 00340 Item - 01 Date: 1746/02/11 ). Before 24 September 1764 Anson County included all or parts of the SC counties of Marlboro, Chesterfield, Lancaster, York, Chester, Cherokee, Union, Spartanburg, Greenville, Laurens, and Newberry.

The identity of Hezekiah Russ helps to clarify which William Duke was witness to this document. The will of Jonathan Russ, Sr., of Berkeley County, identifies sons John, Benjamin, Abijah, Jonathan, and Hezekiah.[33]Hezekiah Russ owned land in Berkeley County, which he sold to John Bruce.[34] Other documents establish that this property was in Christ Church Parish.[35] Additional land documents place Hezekiah Russ and his family in Berkeley County, for example a 1727 deed.[36] William Weekley was a witness when the Russ family disposed of 300 acres on the Wando River that had been owned by their father.[37] William was a brother of Thomas Weekley of Orangeburg.[38] Hezekiah Russ was also a witness when William Snow sold land to Alexander Nisbett in 1735 and when his brother John Snow sold land to Nisbett in 1736.[39] The Snow’s plantation Red Bank, which was located on the Cooper River between the confluence with the Back River and Goose Creek, was sold to Nisbett in 1729.[40]

John Duke, Son of William and Joan

The fate of Joan Duke’s minor son, John, is not known. However, there is at least one John Dukes in the appropriate area in the late 18th and early 19th century. In 1778 Colonel Pinckney listed John Dukes, from the 6th Regiment, South Carolina Line, Continental Establishment (army), in his Order Book, April 1, for garrison court martial. He was accused of having “transgressed the Rules and Orders of the General Hospital.”[41] The 6th Regiment was largely from Charleston, and was quartered there in 1778. The 6th Regiment was part of the Continental Line, or regular army, in contrast to the militia.

In 1786 a John Dukes had a plat for 250 acres on Lemons Swamp:

Series No. S213192 

Volume: 0038 

Page: 00265 

Item:01 

Date: 1801/02/26

Description: OMELVENEY, SAMUEL, PLAT FOR 250 ACRES ON BEAVER DAM BRANCH OF LEMONS SWAMP, ORANGEBURGH DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN MILHOUS FOR JOHN DUKES ON MARCH 2, 1786.

Names Indexed: OMELVENEY, SAMUEL/MILHOUS, JOHN/DUKES, JOHN/MEDLOCK, ELIZABETH/SANDFORD, JAMES/BUDD, DR./

Locations: BEAVERDAM BRANCH/LEMON CREEK/ORANGEBURG DISTRICT

Type: PLAT/

This is of particular interest because a decade later a James Dukes acquired a grant on Lemons Creek adjacent the Tucker family. A younger James Dukes and the Tuckers immigrated to Mississippi and their descendants have been proven to be derived from the same family as the Dukes of Orangeburgh, SC, through yDNA studies ( see http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dukedna/dukedna.htm).

Later William Dukes in Charleston

After Joan’s will was probated a few other references to a William Duke in the Charleston area appear. In 1776 a Captain William Duke was listed for a military pension.[42] This was presumably not the Capt. William Dukes who later served as a captain in the militia under Col. Brandon after the fall of Charleston, and was still in the militia in 1782 (A. A. 2069; X2795; South Carolina Department of History and Archives).[43] He was possibly William Duke in Prince Frederick Parish, north of the Santee River.

There is also the William Duke who witnessed this real estate transaction.

Charleston Deed Book Y-5, pp. 56-60: “Lease and mortgage, 2 & 3 Apr 1787, John Gatch of Charleston, SC, carpenter, and Catherine his wife, to Lightfoot Harrison Davis and James Nicholson, both of said city, by bond in the penal sum of 60 pounds sterling, as tenants in common and not as joint tenants, lot in the village of Rumney on Meeting Street on a creek which divides it from the distillery. John Gatch (LS) Catherine Gatch (LS) (S) (LS), Wit: Wm. Duke, John DeWitt. Proved in Charlestown District by the oath of John DeWitt 23 Apr 1787 before Peter Horry, J. P. Recorded 23 Apr 1787." Ref: South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1783-1788.

By 1757 John Dewitt owned land on Jeffrys Creek, Craven County.[44] This is the Florence, SC, area and was the location of Benjamin Duke’s in-laws, Burtonhead Boutwell and Elizabeth Commander.[45] DeWitt was a clerk of court. It is likely that this William Duke is the son of Benjamin Duke who was baptized in 1745, the William Duke of Williamsburg County.

 

This document is copyright © 2007 by Lynn Teague. All rights reserved. The copyright must appear on all copies.

 

Lowcountry Dukes Index

Home

 

 



[1] South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine Vol. 74 (4): 199.

[2] Webber, Mabel L. 1919. Register of Christ Church Parish. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. XX: 70.

[3] Webber, Mabel L. 1919. Register of Christ Church Parish. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. XX: 68.

[4] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 75.

[5] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 74.

[6] Salley, A. S., Jr. 1907. Journal of the Grand Council of South Carolina April 11 1692-September 26, 1692. Columbia: The Historical Commission of South Carolina. Page 61.

[7] Wright, David McCord. 1961. Petitioners to the Crown Against the Proprietors. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. LXII (2): 89, 95.

[8] Colonial Grants. Series: L10005 Reel - 0001 Plat - 00505 ignore - 00  Date: 1705/04/0. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

Colonial Grants. Series: S111001 Volume - 0003 Page - 00503 Item - 03 Date: 1733/05/08. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[9] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 6.

[10] Joseph Tobias advertised as a merchant in Charleston between 1744 and 1749. (Calhoun, Jane A., Martha A. Zierden, and Elizabeth A. Paysinger. 1985. The Geographic Spread of Charleston’s Mercantile Community, 1732-1767. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 86 (3): 182-220.)

[11] Judgment Rolls. Vol. 33A, Item 0104A. South Carolina Department of History and Archives.

[12] Samuel Varnor was a resident of Christ Church Parish, with his wife Susannah and children. (Webber, Mabel L. 1920. The Register of Christ Church Parish. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. XXI (2): 54, 57, 58.

[13] Judgment Rolls. Vol. 34B, Item 0053A. South Carolina Department of History and Archives.

[14] Webber, Mabel L. 1919. The Register of Christ Church Parish. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. XX (1): 69.

[15] Coldham, Peter Wilson. 2000. American Migrations 1765-1799. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company.

[16] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha A. Simmons. Comp. and ed. 1960. Abstracts of the Wills of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. I. Columbia: R. L. Bryan Company.  P.225.

[17] Judgment Rolls. Vol. 37A, Item 0070A. South Carolina Department of History and Archives.

[18] Judgment Rolls. Vol. 41B, Item 0019A. South Carolina Department of History and Archives.

[19] Warren, Mary B., ed. 1977. South Carolina Jury Lists 1718-1783. Danielsville GA: Heritage Papers. Page 50.

[20] Judgment Rolls. Vol. 52A, Item 53A. South Carolina Department of History and Archives.

[21] Charleston County Wills, Vol. 14 (1771-74), page 139.

[22] Holcomb, Brent H. 1978. Probate Records of South Carolina. Vol. 2. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 16.

[23] Holcomb, Brent, abs. 1994. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1773-1778. Books F-4 through X-4. Columbia: SCMAR. P.10, 221., 234

[24] South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. VII (2): 105.),

[25] Holcomb, Brent, abs. 1994. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1773-1778. Books F-4 through X-4. Columbia: SCMAR. P.221.

[26] South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. XIV (1): 22

[27] Webber, Mabel L. 1913. Register of St. Andrew’s Parish, Berkeley County, South Carolina. 1719-1774. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. XIV(2): 2.

[28] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. IV: 1767-1773, Books I-3 - E-4. Easely: Southern History Press. Page 236

[29] Charleston Inventories. Vol. 7, pages 19-20. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[30] Vol. 12, Item 6138, McCrady Plats. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[31] Judgment Rolls. Vol. 52A, Item 53A. South Carolina Department of Archives and History..

[32] Olsberg, Nicholas R. 1973. Ship Registers in the South Carolina Archives. South Carolina Historical Magazine. Vol. 74(4):237.

[33] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha Aimar Simmons, ed. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. 1. Charlotte, N.C.: Observer Printing House, Inc. P. 125.

[34] Memorials. Series Number S111001. Vol. 3. Page 78. Item 2. Date: 1773/05/15. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[35] Memorials. Series Number S111001. Vol. 3, page 79. Item 01. Date 1733/05/15. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[36] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 100-101.

[37] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 105-106.

[38] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha Aimar Simmons, ed. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. 1. Charlotte, N.C.: Observer Printing House, Inc. P. 211.

[39] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 240, 271.

[40] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P. 120.

[41] South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. VIII:81.

[42] LDS Military Pensions, Various Counties - S. Carolina 1750-1900: 0855233, frame 0559.

[43] Moss, Bobby Gilmer. 1983. Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Page 272.

[44] Colonial Plats. Series No. S213184. Volume 0006. Page 00295. Item 02. Date: 1757/03/22. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[45] South Carolina inventories Vol. Y p.139-145 3 Oct. 1769, Burtonhead Boutwell, Roll #ST497. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.