The Duke Family South of the James River

Thomas Duke of Nansemond

On 22 Oct 1667 Thomas Duke in the Parish of Chucktuck, Nansemond County, gave power of attorney to William Epam [Exum] to receive cattle belonging to his wife Margaret that were in the care of Silvester Thacker in Rappahannoch (Old Rappahannock Co VA Deeds Bk 3: 345). Thatcher or Thacker as first granted land in 1643 on Pagan Point in Isle of Wight Co VA, with Anthony Fulliam.[i] However, he soon moved on. In 1650 Thacker was granted a thousand acres on the Rappananock.[ii] In 1656 Thacker acquired 1000 acres on the Rappahanock,[iii] and again in 1660.[iv] In her history of the Duke family (actually covering several unrelated families) Brandenberger speculates that Thacker was holding an inheritance for Margaret Duke.

The Exums were also from Isle of Wight Co VA. William Exum was the son of immigrant Thomas Exum. William’s son, William Exum Jr., obtained land on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp at Round Hill in 1723.[v] His grandson Joseph Exum married Elizabeth Kinchen, daughter of William Kinchen and sister of Patience Kinchen who married Ethelred Taylor II. Joseph’s brother Robert Exum married Patience Williamson, daughter of George Williamson and Hester Bridger, and was party to a 1737 deed for land north of the Blackwater Swamp, also signed by various Williamsons and Elizabeth Joyner and witnessed by John Clayton. Thomas Hardyman (of the Surry Co family that intermarried with the family of Elizabeth Taylor Duke), and Thomas Morein.[vi]

All of these connections indicate that Thomas Duke of Nansemond County had his closest ties in neighboring Isle of Wight Co VA, in the same local areas where both Elizabeth Duke Taylor and John Duke of Isle of Wight lived and with families closely associated with the Duke and Taylor families.

In 1702 Thomas Duke was granted 350 acres at Barham in Nansemond County adjoning Peter Phalus, a atree in the line fo Richard Barfield to a branch on the side of Barham Swamp (VPB 19: 479).

Chuckatuck was the site of a substantial Quaker settlement.[vii]

In 1678 the following patent is of interest: “10 Nov 1678. 176 acres part therof patented 10 Nov 1678 to Wm. Speight “at a place called Barbicue” . . . adj. Humphry Griffin . . . to an island in Cross Swamp, to the land of James Duke.”[viii]

John Duke, son of Thomas, had 400 acres by patent in 1703, and on 8 Apr 1711 Thomas Duke, son of Thomas, and John Duke acquired a grant along the line of Thomas Duke next to Francis Mace (VPB 10:397).

William Duke and Hannah Grendon

William Duke was assigned 600 acres of land on Chippokes Creek between Surry and Prince George Counties, later identified as escheated and claimed by his widow Hannah Grendon and her fourth husband, William Archer. William Duke was referred to as“of Martin’s Brandon.” Martin’s Brandon is immediately east of Flowerdew Hundred in Prince George Co. VA, and immediately west of Upper Chippokes Creek. This may have been the same individual for whom Justinian Cooper claimed credit for transport in 1639.[ix] Cooper received land at the head of Lawnes Creek in eastern Surry Co, but this would not necessarily dictate where William Duke settled, and the distance between the two locations is not great in any case.

In 1671 William Bird, agent for Sadler and Quiney in the colony, purchased a grist mill at the head of Chippokes Creek, which divides Prince George and Surry counties (Surry Co VA Deed Bk 1, p. 387). Bird was married to Hannah Grendon, widow of Thomas Jennings. By 29 Sep 1672 records show that his son Thomas Bird had inherited the mill.

(Thomas Bird died by 5 Jan 1688, when his widow Mary had remarried to George Nicholson. He left three daughters, among them Elizabeth, wife of John Lanier, who with her sisters inherited Bird’s land on the South Branch of Upper Chippokes Creek. The Lanier connection will later be of interest.)

By 1772 William Duke had married the widow of William Byrd, Hannah Grendon:[x]

Abstract. William Duke and Hannah his wife, relict and admrx of William Bird, dec’d., to put in security for sd administration, exhibit inventory, etc. Also appointed guardian of her daughter Elizabeth one of the orphans of Thomas Bird decd and ordered to put in security for her part of the estate. Also that Nevet Wheeler guardian of Thomas Bird one of the orphans of Thomas Bird put in security.

Duke was further involved in settling the affairs of Byrd’s estate:[xi]

Ordered -- Robert Wynne and Nicho Wyatt to meet at Martins Brandon, examinek, witness, and prepare for trial the case of John Sadlier and Thomas Quiney by Tho Blayton their atty against Wm. Duke & Hannah his wife, admx of Wm. Bird decd.

And further: [xii]

20th Aug. 1672

"Mr. Sherwood: Pray appear and Prosecute an Action agt (against) Mr. Richd Welback att my Suitt on Marring ye relict of Mr. Bird, dec'd, at ye Next Court to be held for Surry County & what ye doe therein shall be allow by"

                                                                   yr friend

                                                                   Wm. Duke

       25th 9br 1672

"At a Court held at Southwark for the County of Surry 25th 9br 1672 Judgment granted Wm Duke as Maringe ye Relict of Wm Burd agt: Thos. Busby for paymt: of one hundred and fifty fox skins due by bill & fifteene shillings sterling with costs. alias Exec: but Liberty granted ye sd Busby to discount what he can make apeare befoe Capt. Wyat that he hath satisfied out of ye sd Debt."

And another transaction:[xiii]

At a Court held June 3, 1673, William Duke and Hannah his wife Administrix of William Bird decd being an action of debt against Thomas Meriton on a bill of 454 pounds of tobacco etc.

Boddie described the family of Hannah Grendon.[xiv] She was the daughter of Thomas Grendon, Sr., a London merchant who often lived in Virginia. He married Elizabeth Stegge, widow of Col. Thomas Stegge, Puritan Commissioner to Virginia. The Stegges were the parents of Grace Stegge who married John Byrd, goldsmith of London, father of the first Col. William Byrd of Westover.

Hannah Grendon married first Thomas Jennings of London, Merchant, by whom she had a son, Thomas, also a London merchant, said to have become a distiller in Isle of Wight Co VA. She married second William Bird of Martin’s Brandon in Charles City, on the south side of the James, now in Prince George County. This William Bird represented the London merchants John Sadler and Thomas Quincey in Virginia, and was probably closely related to John Bird of London.

The will of Thomas Grendon, Jr., of Staffordshire, proved in the Principal Court of Canterbury on 29 Oct 1680, provides for sister Rebekah Grendon Symonds, for Hannah (as Hannah Archer) and for Hannah’s child with her first husband, Thomas Jennings. Thomas Jennings is listed in the records of the Company of Drapers, London, as living at Isle of Wight Co, VA, from 1616-1620, and a note in the records indicates that he died there. However, Hannah Grendon also had Thomas Byrd and Elizabeth Byrd, children of her marriage to William Byrd. Grendon’s will mentions William Byrd Jr., son of William Byrd Sr. of Henrico Co VA, but does not mention Hannah’s children with the other (third) William Byrd, of Martin’s Brandon, VA.

Elizabeth Byrd is said in Murphy family oral tradition to have married Richard Murphy. I have no evidence in support of this or subsequent parts of their family oral traditioneither for or against this. It is interesting, and has multiple points of intersection with the Byrd and Duke families, but is very unlikely to be completely accurate.

William Duke served on a jury that found William Caswell, mariner, guilty of defaming Anthony Wyatt. John Stith was foreman of the jury (Charles City County Court Order Book 1664-1696, p.610).[xv] Legal resolution of some of William Duke’s business affairs are also reflected in the Charles City County Court Order Book 1664-1696, for example pp. 513, 543, 595).[xvi] Duke was found to be concealing five titheables, presumably to avoid taxes.[xvii]

The Virginia Colonial Records Project includes references to a William Duke, merchant, in a list of exports from the Port of London. Duke shipped goods in the Recovery, John Wood master, in 1674.[xviii]

Wm. Duke ind.; 400 ells nar. Ger. llinen, per Peter Causton, 2 June last; 18 ells linen per William Jarrett; 3 June last; 2 pos. lockrams per William Berry, 16 April last; 75 ells Vittry canvas per David Conyard, 15 April last; late etc. dat. 8 Sept.

The individuals for whom Duke was shipping have not been specifically identified. However, the Jarrett family owned land near the Sunken Marsh Path in Lawnes Creek Parish, Surry Co, VA, near William Newsum, Robert Ruffin, William Harris, William Gray, William Carter, and Matthew Swan.[xix]

In 1676 William became involved with Nathaniel Bacon, Jr., in his uprising against the Virginia governor. (If William was one of the Suffolk Duke family, then Bacon was his brother-in-law.) William and others presented a petition of complaint against a colonel in the governor's militia. [xx]

Besides of the unlawful proceedings of the s'd Hill, about the estate of Thomas Grendon, of which yo' honors are already partly informed, and besides the s'd Hill's placeing and constituteing the s'd Grendon's House a Prison, keeping therein (guard and all) about thirty persons for the space of three weeks, killing of his stock and destroying his provisions and coverting other of to the use of himselfe and family to the great wrong and oppression of the s'd Grendon, Hee the s'd Hill unlawfully and unwarrantably seized the goods, etc. Signed May 10, 1677.

                                                                                                                        Bern'd Sykes

                                                                                  James Minge

                                                                                  Tho. Blayton

                                                                                  N. Wyatt

                                                                                  Wm. Duke

                                                                                  Thos. Grendon

                                                                                  James Biss

Hill responded to the charges: [xxi]

Edward Hill in answer to diverse false scandalous article draune (drawn) up against him my the (above) hands...as from the hands of the people of Charles City County humbly answearith: . . . Mr. Duke was one of Bacons good Justices in hastening forwarding, taking and giving of Bacons oathe, and because Bacons captain, Newt Wheeler should not want force to fight & destroy the Governrs soldiers, (Duke) sends two of his own servants that shed the first Christian blood and also before that sent one to go with Bacon on the Occaneechee march... As for Mr. Grendon, although he was not in the country, yet his good wife was & therefore is engaged, but I shall be silent . . .

Duke died in 1678 and on 28 Nov 1681 Hannah’s fourth husband, William Archer, was granted 600 acres of land that had been due his predecessor, William Duke.[xxii] The sale of a slave girl to William Duke was also dealt with: [xxiii]

To all People to whom these presents shall come, Greetings Whereas upon the one & twentieth day of June in ye yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred Seaventy & Seven, I Tho. Busby of Surry Co. did barguaine & Sell unto mr wm. Duke of Martin Brandon, one Indyan Girle of about Nine yeares of age as a Slave for her life & did covenant to & with the sd Mr Duke to make full firme & good assurance of the sd girlle unto ye sd mr Duke, his heirs, Exors (executors), Admrs (administrator), & etc. And whereas by the hand of Almighty ye sd mr Duke departed this life before ye same was affected & whereas Wm. Archer has marryed ye relict & Administratrix of the sd Mr Duke, Know yee That I the said Thos. Busby haveing reced full and valuable Consideration doe hereby bargauine & Sell & firmely make over ye abovementioned Indian Girle call Bess, as a Slave for life unto sd Wm Archer...& doo hereby promise for me my heires Exors Admrs to asknowledge this bill of sale in County Cort of Charles Citty or Surry when therto required by ye said Wm. Archer.

In Witness whereof I have hereunto Sett my hand & Seal this 25th day of Janry 1678 & in ye 30th yeare of his Majties Reigne whoe God Preserve.

A William Archer served on a jury in Henrico County in 1736.[xxiv] A later William Archer, possibly a descendant, was conspicuous in the Revolutionary War affairs of Amelia County VA, which was made from Prince George in 1734.[xxv]

DNA and William Duke

Upon learning that the Duke family has a new DNA branch, R1b and apparently unrelated to the I haplotype groups, and that this individual lives 20 miles from Westover and comes from a family tracing their descent from a William Duke who was said to have immigrated to VA with William Byrd, my posting to Genforum:

Very interesting! I hadn't noticed before, but in fact William Byrd I of Westover and William Duke of Martin's Brandon apparently did go to Virginia in the same year. And they were certainly connected by marriage.

William Byrd I inherited his Virginia lands from Thomas Stegge Jr. , whose will was dated 1671. So, it was probably 1672 before things were settled and WB I would have gone to see his new property. (Also, he was just 19 when he inherited.) William Duke of Martin's Brandon, third husband of Hannah Grendon, appears in Virginia records in (lo and behold) 1672.

As to their connection -- all obsessive followers of the VA Duke families (like me) will doubtless recall that William Byrd I was the son of John Byrd of London and his wife Grace Stegge Byrd, and therefore grandson of Thomas Stegge Sr. by his first wife (name unknown). Thomas Stegge Sr.'s second wife, Elizabeth, married second Thomas Grendon Sr. Thomas Grendon Sr. and Elizabeth Grendon's daughter Hannah married first Thomas Jennings, second William Byrd (unspecified relative of the other William Byrds, employed by the folks who originally owned Martin's Brandon) and she married third William Duke who appears in VA in 1672.

Although Hannah Grendon and William Byrd's father John Byrd shared no DNA that we know of, they would have sat around the same nuclear family dinner table as children of the Thomas Stegge Sr.-Thomas Grendon Sr. -various wives family. So, when Wm. Duke of Martin's Brandon married Hannah, a daughter of the same convoluted consortium of parents that produced Grace Stegge Byrd, wife of John Byrd and mother of William Byrd I, he was more or less (counting the serial monogramists as one set of parents) married to Wm. Byrd I's aunt.

And incidentally -- they didn't quit there. Thomas Stegge Jr. and Thomas Grendon Jr. married the same woman. Sort of a family tradition I guess.

Capt. Henry Duke and Elizabeth Taylor Duke

Although it is unlikely that Hannah Grendon Duke was the mother, various authors have considered William Duke the father of a later member of the Duke family in the same area, Capt. Henry Duke. Others trace Capt. Henry Duke’s parentage to Col. Henry Duke.

Henry Duke is not mentioned in any Virginia settlement of the estate of William Duke. The only reference that appears in the records is William Archer, third husband of Hannah Grendon, taking possession of a grant that was in process to William Duke before his death. There is no mention of orphans of William Duke, so the probability of minor children at the time of his death seems low. Hannah certainly attended to those legal niceties when Thomas Bird died. However, Henry could have been an adult when William died, and could have been elsewhere rather than in Virginia, making it sensible for Hannah to administer the Virginia estate. Given the relatively short time that William Duke seems to have been in Virginia, and the relatively advanced age of Hannah (her third marriage, after all) and presumably William as well, this makes sense. However, this would make Henry fairly old to be the father of John, John Taylor, and Henry Duke of Prince George Co VA.

Capt. Henry Duke of Martin’s Brandon, died in about 1718. There is ample documentation that this Henry Duke married Elizabeth Taylor, daughter of Capt. John Taylor of Flowerdew Hundred, son of Richard Taylor and his wife Sarah Barker, who was in turn daughter of William Barker and Elizabeth Langhorne. In a message from Janet Washbon dated 8 May 2008 she points out that evidence suggests this William Barker was the individual, identified as a mariner, who married Mary Goulding on 6 Feb 1622 at St. Dunstan’s Parish, London. The parish records document the birth of a child, Sarah, about 18 Oct 1638, the death of Mary Barker, and subsequently the birth of a daughter, Sarah, to William Barker and his wife Frances. This Sarah Barker appears to be the individual who married into the Duke family in Virginia. After the death of Richard Taylor his widow Sarah married Robert Lucy. (St. Dunstan’s has many familiar Virginia names in its parish register.)

Captain John Taylor was a member of the House of Burgesses from Charles City County in 1692-99 and clerk of the county in 1699. He was captain of the ship Merchant’s Hope. John Taylor married Henrietta Maria, commonly believed to have been Henrietta Maria Lucy. This is supported by the inheritance of land granted to Robert Lucy by Taylor, and subsequently by his daughter Henrietta Maria.[xxvi]

John and Henrietta Maria Taylor had four daughters. Frances Taylor married a Mr. Greenhill. Elizabeth Taylor married Capt. Henry Duke and died after Oct 1732. Henrietta Maria Taylor married John Hardyman, and Sarah Taylor married Francis Hardyman. The two Hardymans were sons of John Hardyman Sr. and Mary Eppes, daughter of Francis Eppes and Elizabeth Worsham.

It is the family of William Barker, grandfather of Elizabeth Taylor Duke, that most closely links William Duke of Martin’s Brandon with Capt. Henry Duke. Barker was one of the original persons patenting the land of Flowerdew Hundred, in company with John Sadler and Richard Quinney or Quiney, London merchants.[xxvii] It will be remembered that these were the merchants for whom William Byrd, who married Hannah Grendon, was agent in Virginia.

Capt. Henry Duke’s estate was appraised in Prince George Co VA on 22 Jul 1718 at £ 202/11/5 by John Poythress, John Hatch, and Gilbert Hay. The inventory was presented to the court by Elizabeth Duke, administrator. At the same time, she attempted to separate slaves inherited from her father from her husband’s estate.[xxviii]

Elizabeth must have had a good head for business. On 4 Dec 1722 John Woofe of London, merchant, appointed Elizabeth Duke of Flowerdew Hundred his attorney in Virginia.[xxix] She was also busy with her own affairs and those of her family. On 10 Oct 1721 Elizabeth Duke witnessed a deed for land on Powell’s Creek for her sister Henrietta Maria and her husband John Hardyman. This deed includes a later memo dated 21 Oct 1721 and witnessed by William Jackson, among others.[xxx] On 7 May 1725 Elizabeth Duke sold land on the north side of Blackwater Swamp, bounded by William Harris, to Robert Hall.[xxxi] On 9 Jul 1725 Henrietta Maria and John Hardyman sold 300 acres at Flowerdew Hundred bounded on the west by Elizabeth Duke’s land to John Poythress.[xxxii] On 8 Apr 1726 Elizabeth Duke sold the remainder of her land on the north side of Blackwater Swamp to Robert Hall.[xxxiii]

It is said that Elizabeth Taylor Duke used the seal of the Duke family of Otterton, Devon, as her seal on the conveyance of her portion of her father’s estate at Flowerdew Hundred.[xxxiv] The original has apparently been lost:[xxxv]

On 6 Oct 1732, Elizabeth Duke of the County of Prince George, widow, sold to Joshua Poythres, merchant, of the same county, “that Messauge Tenement Plantation and Tract of Land commonly known by the name fflower de hundred Containing by estimation two hundred and fifty Acres. Situate and being in the Parish of Martin’s Brandon and County aforesaid . . . Land of the said Joshua Poythres and the Line of Frances Greenhill . . . to the James River . . . heretofore in the Possession of one John Taylor Gent late of said County Deceased and Devised by his last Will and Testament unto the said Elizabeth Duke and her Heirs, etc. “ Signed by Elizabeth Duke and signed and sealed and delivered in the presence of Daniel Eelbank, John Duke, John Taylor Duke, and Henry Duke (from a copy of the original in the possession of Va., Hist. Society Library, Richmond, VA.,).

D. W. Duke presented the following evidence that Capt. Henry was the son of Col. Henry Duke in a Genforum listing:

Posted by: D.W. Duke (ID *****3988)               Date: November 02, 2003 at 15:29:47

Because this issue has been raised, I wanted to briefly post some notes from a rough draft of a project I am working on for the Duke family. Note that it is rough and not all sources are cited. However, I believe it is important enough to share it now since several family members are writing books on this family and we really don't need any more mistakes.

Captain Henry Duke (Henry Duke Jr.)

There has been much controversy concerning the first generation descendant of Col. Henry Duke, Henry Duke Jr. and whether he was one and the same as Capt. Henry Duke. This researcher is of the belief that there is no question that Henry Duke Jr., son of Col. Henry Duke, and Capt. Henry Duke were one and the same. The sequence of events is as follows:

1. Col. Henry Duke appears on the scene in James City County Virginia in 1680 where he is listed as a justice. (A land patent in 1682 refers to an assignment of land in 1670 that may refer to Capt. Henry Duke at that time. The record is unclear due to the language of the patent.)

2. Henry Duke Jr. appears in the quit rent roles on 1000 acres of land, apparently the one thousand acres of land owned by Col. Henry Duke.

3. In 1704 Col. Henry Duke and Henry Duke Jr. both witnessed a will of Col. William Byrd. (This will be discussed more fully below.)

4. There are no further references to Henry Duke Jr. in the records.

5. However, land records make numerous references to a Capt. Henry Duke.

6. There is no other Henry Duke in the vicinity who could be construed to be Henry Duke Jr.

Based upon the above records alone, there is a rebuttal presumption that Capt. Henry Duke is one and the same as Henry Duke Jr. and that they are the son of Col. Henry Duke. However, there exists much more corroborating evidence that must be considered. That evidence is as follows:

On January 12, 1704, the will of Col. William Byrd is witnessed by five persons including: Henry Duke, Fr. Nicholson, Littlebury Epps, Henry Duke, Jr., Joshua Wynn. The identity of these witnesses is very important in showing that Henry Duke Jr. and Capt. Henry Duke were one and the same.

It is important to recognize that each and every person who witnessed the will of Col. William Byrd, with the exception of Littlebury Eppes (Epps) had a familial relationship to William Byrd in some manner. Typically, whenever possible, family members were used to witness a will because it was very important that the witness know the testator very well. It was very important when witnessing a will that the witness know the testator very well for two reasons: 1) He should know the testator very well so that he can identify that the person who signed the will is indeed the person he purports to be; and 2) He should be able to assert, if the will is challenged, that he knows that the language of the will is consistent with the intent of the testator.

Of the five witnesses to the will of William Byrd, four of the five had a familial relationship with William Byrd. However, Littlebury Eppes lacked that familial relationship with William Byrd unless it can be shown that he has that relationship through one of the other four witnesses. It is the position of this researcher that Littlebury Eppes did indeed have that relationship through Henry Duke Jr. because Henry Duke Jr. was none other than Capt. Henry Duke who was married to the nephew of Littlebury Eppes, Elizabeth Taylor. Lets briefly look at the relationship of each of the witnesses to the will of William Byrd:

Col. Henry Duke

The relationship between Col. Henry Duke and the others is that Henry Duke’s son, James, married the daughter of William Byrd, Mary Byrd. Additionally, Col. Henry Duke’s son Henry Duke Jr. witnessed the will.

Henry Duke Jr.

Thus, Henry Duke Jr. was also related to William Byrd in that his brother James was married William Byrd’s daughter Mary Byrd. As will be seen below, Henry Duke Jr. was also related to Littlebury Epps.

Francis Nicholson:

Hannah Grendon married first Thomas Jennings, a merchant of London 1685. After Jennings dies, she married William Byrd. They had a child named Thomas Byrd who married a Mary (unknown). Thomas Byrd died and left a will. Mary, his widow, married a second husband named George Nicholson. Thomas was the cousin of William Byrd, whose will was witnessed in 1704 (above). By her marriage to George Nicholson, Mary the widow of Thomas Byrd, connected the Nicholson and Byrd families. William had no doubt become fond of his cousin’s wife, such that her new husband Francis Nicholson, was welcomed into the family. This created the relationship between the Nicholsons and the Byrds. Francis Nicholson, who witnessed the will of William Byrd was governor of Virginia.

As a footnote, it should be noted that Hannah Grendon’s third husband was the William Duke, who was no doubt an older brother or cousin of Col. Henry Duke. William Duke was justice of Charles City County in 1677. Thus, Col. Henry had a second connection to William Byrd in addition to his son James.

Wynne:

Joshua Wynne also witnessed the will of William Byrd. Robert Wynne’s widow married William Byrd and Minor Wynne, son of John Wynne and Elizabeth Minor, married Martha Ann Byrd, the wife of William Byrd. Thus, the Byrds and the Wynnes had a relationship.

Epps:

Littlebury Epps also witnessed the will of William Byrd in 1704. Unlike the other witnesses to William Byrd’s will, Littlebury Epps had no independent familial relationship to William Byrd. Or did he?

Capt. Henry Duke’s second wife was Elizabeth Taylor. It is by this connection to Elizabeth Taylor that we see the significance of Henry Duke Jr. at the witnessing the will along with Littlebury Epps. Elizabeth Taylor, Francis Taylor, Sarah Taylor and Henrietta Maria Taylor were the daughters of John Taylor and his wife Henrietta Maria. They had no sons.

Elizabeth Taylor married Capt. Henry Duke. Francis Taylor married a Mr. Greenhill, Sarah Taylor married Francis Hardiman and Henrietta Maria Taylor married John Hardiman the brother of John Hardiman. The mother of Francis and John Hardiman was Mary Epps, the wife of Lt. Col. John Hardiman and sister of Littlebury Epps who witnessed the will of William Byrd.

It is particularly important to recognize the close relationship of these families. The descendants of Capt. Henry Duke, through William Duke the elder, used the names Eppes, Hardiman and Taylor as first names for their children. This shows that William the elder was indeed the son of Capt. Henry. Additionally, the descendants of Cleavers Duke used the name Taylor in their line, in honor of the woman who raised Cleavers, Elizabeth Taylor (Duke).

Evidence that Henry Duke Jr. and Capt. Henry Duke were one and the same:

As set forth above the importance sequence of events is as follows:

1. Col. Henry Duke appears on the scene in James City County Virginia in 1680 where he is listed as a justice. (A land patent in 1682 refers to an assignment of land in 1670 that may refer to Capt. Henry Duke at that time. The record is unclear due to the language of the patent.)

2. Henry Duke Jr. appears in the quit rent roles on 1000 acres of land, apparently the one thousand acres of land owned by Col. Henry Duke.

3. In 1704 Col. Henry Duke and Henry Duke Jr. both witnessed a will of Col. William Byrd. (This will be discussed more fully below.)

4. There are no further references to Henry Duke Jr. in the records.

5. However, land records make numerous references to a Capt. Henry Duke.

6. There is no other Henry Duke in the vicinity who could be construed to be Henry Duke Jr.

Add the additional piece of evidence, that Henry Duke Jr. (Capt. Henry Duke) witnessed the will of William Byrd, thus providing a relationship between William Byrd and a fifth unrelated witness, Littlebury Eppes, and the evidence clearly shows that Henry Duke Jr. and Capt. Henry Duke were one and the same.

Still Further Evidence that Henry Duke Jr = Capt. Henry Duke

Posted by: D.W. Duke (ID *****3988)  Date: December 01, 2003 at 20:19:17

Once again, my research has turned up still further evidence that Henry Duke Jr is one and the same as Capt. Henry Duke. I post this for others who are researching and writing on this topic.

Ludwells MSS, in 1724 refers to Elizabeth, widow of Henry Duke, and James Duke, Gent., as the surviving executors of Henry Duke, Esq.

Strangely EDB misinterpreted this to mean that the widow of Col. Henry Duke was someone named Elizabeth.

Morris' interpretation is even a little stranger. She concluded that this is referring to yet another Henry Duke married to an Elizabeth Duke.

What neither EDB nor Morris recognized (I didn't bother to check Walter on this one) is that the following occurred:

Col. Henry Duke died in 1713. At that time, his son Capt. Henry Duke and his other son James Duke, became the executors of his estate. Capt. Henry Duke died in 1717. At that point, Capt. Henry's wife Elizabeth (Taylor) Duke became the executor of Col. Henry's estate in place of her deceased husband. The estate of Col. Henry was still in probate in 1724. Thus, the surviving executors of his estate were Elizabeth (Taylor) Duke and her brother in law James Duke.

In 1723 Elizabeth Taylor Duke joined with her sisters to sell land on Pigeon Swamp, south of the Blackwater River and west of Cypress Swamp, left to them by their father, Capt. John Taylor:[xxxvi]

p. 123 (p.493) 17 Dec 1723...John Hardyman and wife Henrietta Maria Hardyman, Francis Hardyman and wife Sarah Hardyman, Elizabeth Duke and Frances Greenhill to Nicholas Partridge . . . 262 acres on east side of Pidgeon Swamp and bounded by the Underground Branch and Richard Bland, decd. Wit: John Mason, John (X) Freeman and William (X) Raynes

p. 125-126 (p.529) 17 Dec 1723...John Hardyman and wife Henritta Maria Hardyman, Francis Hardyman and wife Sarah Hardyman, Elizabeth Duke and Frances Greenhill to John Mason...223 acres on east side of Pidgeon Swamp and bounded by Cattail Branch and Richard Bland, decd. Wit: Nicholas Partridge, John (X) Freeman, Jr. and William (X) Rayne Rec: 18 Dec 1723 and 15 Apr 1724

p. 126 (p.532) 17 Dec 1723...John Hardyman and wife Henrietta Maria Hardyman, Francis Hardyman and wife Sarah Hardyman, Elizabeth Duke and Frances Greenhill to Nicholas Partridge...262 acres on east side of Pigeon Swamp and bounded by Underground Branch and Richard Bland, decd. Wit: John Mason, John (X) Freeman, Jr. and William (X) Rayne Rec: 18 Dec 1723 and 15 Apr 1724

It will later be seen that the witnesses to these documents are important in reconstructing aspects of Duke family history in Virginia and in South Carolina.

On 6 Oct 1732 Elizabeth Duke of Prince George Co sold to Joshua Poythress, merchant, her share of the Flowerdew estate, inherited from her father John Taylor (copy of the original, Virginia Historical Society Library, Richmond, VA). Daniel Eelbanks, John Duke, John Taylor Duke, and Henry Duke were witnesses. Daniel Eubanks had married a daughter of Capt. Henry Duke. Shortly after this time, Capt. Henry Duke’s sons began to acquire their own land and live elsewhere.

Elizabeth Duke also had time for a lively social life, perhaps as a means of recovering from the death of her husband. The diaries of William Byrd II of Westover document her frequent appearances at Westover for dinner, some times accompanied by her attorney, John Poythress, and other times by other friends and family members, especially members of the Hardyman and Eppes families.[xxxvii] She took the ferry across the James River from her home at Flowerdew. These frequent visits appear to have begun in 1719, following the death of Capt. Henry Duke, and continued at least through 1721. Robert Munford and members of the Randolph, Bolling, Anderson and Harrison families were also frequent visitors at Westover.

One of the persistent questions surrounding Capt. Henry Duke is the identity of his sons. John Duke was his heir at law,[xxxviii] and was a son of his first wife, who has never been identified. John Taylor Duke and Henry Duke were certainly his sons with Elizabeth Taylor Duke. It is also possiblehas been suggested that William Duke, who first appears in the records of Brunswick Co VA in 1728, was his son. There may have been others. DNA studies have shown this to be incorrect, and associate this William Duke with the family of John Duke of Isle of Wight County, VA (see Group 2 in http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dukedna/dukedna.html).

Evelyn Duke Brandenberger did not accept this reconstruction, instead tracing Capt. Henry Duke through Col. Henry Duke of James City County VA, and identifying William Duke as son of Col. Duke’s son James Duke and his wife Mary Byrd, daughter of William Byrd I of Westover.

John Duke , son of Capt. Henry Duke

The sons of Capt. Henry Duke were apparently living on his Prince George and Surry county properties until about 1733. They appear elsewhere with their own lands, principally in Greensville Co VA, after the sale of the Taylor’s Flowerdew estate in 1732.

On 5 Apr 1733 John Duke bought 285 acres of land on the north side of Three Creeks (Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 1: 36-37).

On 24 Mar 1734 John Duke received land on Three Creeks, Rocky Run, adjacent William Raines, Col. [Benjamin] Harrison, and Thomas Jackson (VPB 15: 481-482). A deed dated 1 June 1750 shows John Duke adjacent Hinchee (Hinshaw or Hinchea) Mabry, John Pettaway, Charles Trunballs, and Thomas Deens on Rocky Run (VPB 29: 107-109). Others with land on Three Creeks were Jehu Peoples, Peter Simmons, Thomas Sissums, Whitmore, Richard Cocke, Richard Pace, Hambleton, Tapley, Charles Kimball, Thomas House, Isaac House, James Wyche, Robert Hix, William Batte, John Peterson, John Davis, Ralph Jackson, William Collier, John Raines, Sampson Lanier, and Richard Ransom. Specifically on Rocky Run we find land belonging to Hinchea Mabry, George Mabry, Charles Trunball, Thomas Deans, William Smith, Thomas Cocke, John Freeman Jr. (but he was still living in Sussex County in1760), Henry Freeman, Benjamin Harrison, Col. Nathaniel Harrison, William Raines, Thomas Jackson, John Cumbow, John Pettaway, John Williamson, William Collier, Hugh Drysdale, and James Washington.

John Duke had many additional land transactions in the Three Creeks area (Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 1: 455; Bk 1: 418; Bk 1: 442; Bk 18: 434; Bk 2: 78; Bk 2:249; Bk 3: 325-327; VPB 18:434).

The House family is well represented in Three Creeks grants. Lucy House became the first wife of Maj. John Duke, as the will of James Fletcher in 1733 and the will of her father, Thomas House, show.[xxxix] A grant in 1724/25 to John Davis “the Welchman” (VPB 12:165) is to the father of Rejoice Davis, who married John Duke after the death of his first wife. John Davis had come to Brunswick Co from Isle of Wight Co VA.

On 5 May 1743 John Duke purchased from John Taylor Duke 504 acres on Moore’s Swamp (Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 1: 277). On 6 Nov 1747 John Duke sold this land to Major Pryor (Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 3: 425-426).

On 8 Oct 1750 John Duke received 500 acres in Lunenburg (now Mecklenburg) Co VA adjoining John Taylor Duke on Flatt Creek (VLP Bk 30: 229). In 1748 John Duke and his son, also John Duke, were on the list of tithables for that part of Lunenburg Co. that became Mecklenburg Co, on the North Carolina border. William Taylor, Thomas Lanier, John Freeman, John Davis, Thomas Jarrett, William Tucker, Owen Myrick, and Nicholas Major were neighbors there.

In 1757 Thomas Taylor acquired land on Flat Creek in what is now Mecklenburg Co VA, adjacent that of John Duke (VPB33p368-369). In 1780 John Williamson acquired land adjacent William Taylor in Mecklenburg (MC# CGB A p598-599).

In 1752 Maj. John Duke is identified as a resident of Dinwiddie Co VA when he sold to Ephraim Mabry land on Flatt Creek in Lunenburg Co (Lunenburg Co VA Deed Bk 4: 19). The appearance of the name Charles Duke as a witness to this deed represents the first evidence of this son of John Duke. John Duke’s sons may have moved to South Carolina.

In Aug 1753 Edward Goodrich (who may have married a daughter of Maj. John Duke) petitioned Brunswick Co Court for time to render an account of the estate of Susanna Duke, daughter of John Duke, deceased (Brunswick Co VA Order Book1: 171). The account was rendered on 26 Aug 1756. (Brunswick, Co VA Orphans Account Bk 5: 28).

John Taylor Duke, Son of Capt. Henry Duke

John Taylor Duke was the son of Capt. Henry Duke and his second wife, Elizabeth Taylor Duke, and was named for his maternal grandfather. It has been proposed by Patrick Anderson to the Duke list on Rootsweb that his wife was Jane Anderson. His argument is as follows:

Descendants of Jane Anderson

Generation No. 1

1. JANE5 ANDERSON (Thomas4, Thomas3, Thomas2, RICHARD1)1 was born Abt. 1705 in "The Cattails", Charles City County, Virginia. She married John TAYLOR Duke, son of HENRY Duke and ELIZABETH TAYLOR. He was born 1705 in Prince George County, Virginia, and died 1790 in Wilkes County, Georgia.

Notes for JANE ANDERSON:

My current theory is that Jane married John Taylor Duke. The connection is unproven but substantiated by the fact that she is born within a few years of John Taylor Duke’s birth date and is a contemporary of his and her brother.

Charles witnessed the 1727 sale of Richard Taylor's 1673 patent which descended to Elizabeth (Taylor) Duke wife of Henry Duke. John Taylor Duke and Jane Anderson definitely knew each other as teenagers but I am still seeking proof that she is his wife Jane.

Jane Anderson was the daughter of Sarah Barker’s last child by her 2nd husband Robert Lucy and Elizabeth (Taylor) Duke was a daughter of John Taylor, Sarah Barker's first child by her 1st husband Richard Taylor. John Taylor, father of Elizabeth was the guardian for Mary Lucy the mother of Jane Anderson in 1694.

Richard Taylor and Robert Lucy obtained side by side patents along the Blackwater River in 1673 and in 1683 Thomas Anderson patented the land above them along Cattail Creek. ________________________________________________

Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds 1710-1713, page 161 Inventory of all Jean Anderson, daughter to Thomas Anderson, dec'd, her estate, bequeathed to her by the said Andreson in his last will & testament. One featherbed in the trundle bedstead with the furniture thereunto belonging, one cow with calf & heifer of Two years old, one chest, one silver tumbler, one small iron pott and pott hooks, two pewter dishes. Pr. Geo County Court the day of [?] 1712.

This above written acctt of estate of Jean Anderson was presented into court by Cornelius Cargill her guardian and ordererd by the justices to be truly recorded - Edward Goodrich

More About JANE ANDERSON:

Living: 1712, Prince George County, Virginia

Linda L. Clements <clements@sierra.net>

John Taylor Duke was born between 1705 and 1710 in Prince George County, Virginia, and was named after his maternal grandfather. He married Jane. He owned land and live in several different counties in Virginia. He seemed to move quite often. Before 1769 he had left Virginia and lived in both North and South Carolina. By the end of the Revolutionary War John Taylor Duke was living in Georgia. (from Duke web site (www.geocities.com/WallStreet/Market/4071/Duke.html presumably taken from a Duke family history book, accessed 7-99)

Endnotes

1. Thomas Anderson, 1711 Will of Thomas Anderson, (1710-1713 Will Book, Page 36, Prince George County, Virginia).

Patrick J. Anderson

http://members.aol.com/patander73/home.html

Like his brother John, John Taylor Duke purchased land in the Three Creeks area (later Greensville Co VA) in 1733.[xl] In 1738 he made an additional purchase.[xli] In 1741 he had moved on to land on Old Field Branch (VPB 20: 135). He sold that tract as well as a previous grant on 4 Feb 1733 to Richard Lanier and James Cocke.[xlii]

John Taylor Duke then moved on to Lunenburg (later Mecklenburg) Co VA near the North Carolina boundary, purchasing land on Flatt Creek, a tributary of the Roanoke River.[xliii] His brothers John and Henry joined him there. It was here that long-standing connections with the Crenshaw and McKee families were formed.

By 1769 John Taylor Duke had moved to Camden District, South Carolina. Evelyn Duke Brandenberger has identified the sons of John Taylor Duke as Robert, Henry, Thomas, James, Edmund, and John.[xliv] Eventually he and many of his descendants moved on to Georgia.

Page 90, Will Book 1, Mecklenburg County, Virginia: Thomas Duke lived in Brunswick County, Virginia in September of 1773 as an overseer for Henry Delony's lands.

The  Taylors

The descendants of Ethelred Taylor owned land on Three Creeks, Greensville Co, near the sons of Capt. Henry Duke, through inheritance. William Kinchen purchased 750 acres on the lower side of Three Creeks from Christopher Hill, and left that land to his son Matthew Kinchen, who in turn left it to William Taylor, his cousin.[xlv] This appears to have been transferred to Ethelred Taylor II, and in 1775 Henry Taylor bought out his brothers’ shares of this property. Henry’s son Ethelred sold much of this land in 1786. All of these individuals seem to have continued to live in Southampton Co VA rather than moving to this property.

In 1731 Daniel Taylor of Brunswick Co VA acquired land in Lunenburg Co VA on Shining Creek (VPB14p346-347). He sold it in 1754 (BRDBk5p569-571). In 1750 Joseph Duke owned land on Shining Creek (VPB34p537).

Henry Duke, son of Capt. Henry Duke

Henry Duke bought his first land in Brunswick Co on 1 Jun 1748, on the south side of Three Creeks (Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 3: 469). This land adjoined that of John Duke. On 6 Sep Henry Duke of Lunenburg County and his wife Elizabeth sold to Edward Goodrich the same land (Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 3: 393). Henry Duke was on the list of tithables for Mecklenburg Co as late as 1764, along with John Davis; Edmond, James, William and Thomas Taylor; Joshua Mabry; John Freeman; and Nathaniel Edwards. The Taylors and Nathaniel Edwards were related through Capt. Henry Duke’s sister, Elizabeth.

Daughter of Capt. Henry Duke and Elizabeth Taylor Duke

A daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Duke married Daniel Eubanks or Eelbanks. Daniel Eelbanks had witnessed the sale of Elizabeth Taylor Duke’s property at Flowerdew Hundred to Joshua Poythress in 1732, as previously noted. On 9 Nov 1724 Daniel Eelbank witnessed the will of Richard Washington, recorded in Surry Co Will Bk 7, p. 583..[xlvi] Richard Washington was the father of Elizabeth Washington, who married Sampson Lanier, Sr.

James Duke : Another son of Capt. Henry Duke? Brother of John Duke the Elder? and Peter Duke in Surry and Prince George

An individual named James Duke appears in Surry Co and Brunswick Co VA records. Who was he?

James Duke appeared in 1727 in Surry Co VA records, as a witness with Dasey Southall and John Ellerbee for a deed from William Rainey to Francis Lightfoot for 100 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp (Surry County Deeds, Wills, Etc. Bk 7, p. 759). Dasey Southall was from Charles City County where he wsa inspector of tobacco.

In 1723 William (x) Rayne was a witness with Nicholas Partridge and John Freeman to a deed from Elizabeth Duke and her sisters for 223 acres on the east side of Pigeon Swamp. The property was bounded by the mouth of Cattail Branch, Richard Bland, decd., and the Underground Branch, and was sold to John Mason (Surry County Deeds, Wills, Etc. Bk 7, p. 491 and p. 529). The Raines family was also closely related to the Myricks. Mary Myrick later married John, son of William Duke. The Myricks were from an area on the boundary of Surry and Isle of Wight counties.[xlvii] The 1727 Surry County reference to the deed from William Rainey to Francis Lightfoot therefore places James Duke in the company of associates of the family of Capt. Henry Duke and his wife Elizabeth Taylor Duke.

Note that the land Elizabeth Taylor Duke sold in 1723 was bounded by that of Richard Bland. The Will of Theodorick Bland in 1783 refers to land purchased from Peter Duke, James Moore, and Henry Batte in Prince George Co VA (Virginia Will Records, Will Fragments: James Blakemore's Will and Wills of Theodorick Bland, Thaddeus Kosciuszkio and ..., Page 646). .

Raines or Rainey also owned land near the Greensville Co area where John Duke, Henry Duke, and John Taylor Duke settled for several decades. His land was on the south side of Three Creeks and the north side of Little Creek in Lawnes Creek Parish, bounding land sold by James Washington to Nathaniel Harrison on 14 Jun 1725, with Sampson Lanier a witness (Surry County Deeds, Wills, Etc. Bk 7, p.591). Raney also bought 150 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp bounded by William Jones and Henry Jones from George Pasamore (Surry County Deeds, Wills, Etc. Bk 7, p.76). Robert Wynne, Burrell Green and William Green were witnesses. George Pasamore’s land bounded that of Thomas House Jr., and William House on Three Creeks (Surry County Deeds, Wills, Etc. Bk 7, p.714).

In 1732 the following is found in the Brunswick Order Book I, page 3:

“John Ross is appointed Surveyor of the Road from Reedy Creek to the courthouse and is ordered that he with male Laboring Fit persons belonging to Joseph Warborton, John Evans, James Arnato, James Duke and William Duke, John Edwards, . . .”

EDB (Vol.II:13) interprets this James as the son of Col. Henry Duke, in keeping with her theory that William Duke was the son of James Duke and his wife Mary Byrd Duke of James County Parish. However, it seems more likely that this is the James Duke who appeared a few years earlier in Surry County with associates of the Capt. Henry Duke family.

An alternative possibility is that this James Duke is a son of John Duke of York County, VA, who in turn was probably a son of Thomas Duke who settled in that area with Thomas Hampton. A 6 Jun 1651 deed recorded by William Byrd in his title book documents this:[xlviii] “Patent to Mr. Thomas Hampton, Clerk, and Thomas Duke for 430 acres containing two necks of land lying on Warreny Creek on the east side of the Chickahominy River, James City County, bounded NW and SSE on a swamp dividing it from land of Edward Cole; ENE upon land of Mr. Soane’s; and due said Hampton and Duke by assignment of rights of transportation of nine persons into the colony by Mr. William Barret. Dated June 6, 1641.” Thomas Duke’s widow subsequently married, after his death, a Wade. A patent was issued to Mrs. Mary Wade for 463 acres on a branch of Tiaskun Swamp, formerly patented to Thomas Hampton who assigned his patent to her (VPB 7: 174). It is likely that Mary Duke Wade was a daughter of Thomas Hampton, to receive hundreds of acres of land from him. (It is said that Thomas Hampton I’s tombstone is on the land of Nathaniel Bacon I on the York River.) In “The Hamptons”, Chapter 12, from Tidewater Virginia Families—A Social History, by Virginia Lee Hutchinson Davis, Urbanna, VA, 1989, it is said that the children of Rev. Thomas Hampton were John (marr. 1. Mary Mann, 2. ___ Cary), Mary (marr. 1. ___ Duke, 2. ___ Wade), Thomas (marr. Elizabeth Bridle).

A probable son of Thomas Duke and Mary Hampton Duke, John Duke, received land on Tyaskon Swamp in 1673. This was on the line dividing New Kent and James City counties. On 15 Dec 1673 he received an additional 136 acres in the same area bounded in part by Joseph Wade (VPB 6:504).

On 19 Jul 1670/71 John Duke received 107 acres in York County VA on the east side of Otter Dam. This was witnessed by Thomas Bushrod and John Scarsbrook (York Co VA Records 1664-1672: 436). John Duke’s wife was Jane Scarsbrook. When the will of John Scarsbrooke was proved in York County Court, John Duke Sr. was already dead, and his widow had remarried, to Thomas Mountfort (York Co VA Probate & Adm. Bonds beginning 1679, p. 174). The will mentioned minor children of John and Jane Duke, but not by name.

On 24 Jan 1692/93, John Duke, son of John Duke of York Co., dec’d, age 21 years of thereabouts, provided a deposition for York County courts (York Co VA 1690-1694, p. 196). John Duke Jr., married Susanna Goodwin, daughter of Maj. James Goodwin. In 1694 a Henry Duke was witness for a document relating to John Duke Jr., suggesting that he might be another son of John Duke Sr. (York Co VA 1693-94, p. 272).

James Duke and Susanna Duke, children of John Duke and Susanna Duke, were mentioned in the will of Rachel Porter Goodwin, second wife of Maj. James Goodwin, father of Susanna (WMQ ). Although Henry Duke continues to appear in York County records for many years, there is no further record of this James Duke in York Co. VA, or of his father John Duke Jr. The James Duke of Surry could be this James Duke of York Co VA.

Elizabeth Duke and James Mason, Ethelred Taylor, and William Edwards

Elizabeth Duke has been identified by EDB as the sister of Capt. Henry Duke of Prince George County, VA. She married first James Mason of Matthews Mount in Surry County. James Mason was the son of Francis Mason, who was born in 1594 and died about 1648, and who came to Virginia in 1613. Francis Mason was a magistrate, vestryman, and sheriff in Lower Norfolk.[xlix] He received a grant in Lynhaven, Lower Norfolk, in 1745.[l] This was very near the area where Thomas Duke of Nansemond County lived. In 1678 Francis Mason received land on Tappahanock or Crouches Creek, in Surry Co.[li] The Petway family was on Crouches Creek from at least 1652.[lii] In 1682 Richard Bennett was granted land on Polantink Swamp adjacent Francis Mason and William Edwards,[liii] Elizabeth Duke’s first father-in-law and her third husband.

James Mason of Southwark Parish, Surry County, and Elizabeth Duke had a son James Mason Jr., who married Mary Petway, daughter of Robert Petway Sr. and Ruth Gwaltney.[liv] They also had sons Francis and John Mason. James Mason Jr. became prominent in Greensville Co VA affairs; Greensville Co Order Book 1 contains numerous references to his public functions and offices. James Mason died in about 1701. Elizabeth probated his estate on 18 Jul 1701.[lv] (A message to me dated 5 Jun 2008 from Carolyn Mason Anderson points out that there has been considerable confusion between two apparently unrelated Mason families in early Virginia. James Mason of Surry County was not related to John Mason of Greensville Co, VA. Furher information is available at http://www.ncroots.com/DNA-Mason-Worldwide/.)

Elizabeth then married Ethelred Taylor. [lvi] On 2 Mar 1702 Ethelred and Elizabeth Taylor presented an inventory of the estate of James Mason, deceased. Ethelred was a first-generation English emigrant, appearing in the Surry Co VA records in 1702. In 1714 he purchased 332 acres in Lawnes Creek Parish from Nathaniel Harrison, William Robinson, and Nathaniel Ridley. William Edwards witnessed the deed.[lvii] Nathaniel Harrison’s grants were in the upper parish adjacent Owen Myrick and William Simons (VPB 9 p496) and near Charles Jordan on Stony Run (VPB 10 p152-153).

Elizabeth and Ethelred Taylor had sons Ethelred, Henry, William, and Samuel. Ethelred Taylor owned many hundreds of acres of land in both Surry and Isle of Wight counties. In 1710 he posted bond as sheriff of Surry County.[lviii] He was frequently called upon for public functions.[lix] With Robert Lancaster he witnessed a deed for land on the south side of Blackwater Swamp (Surry County Deed & Will Book 7 p. 685).

He died in 1716. His will gave lands on Poketank or Pohatink Swamp and the same side of Coker’s branch, purchased from the trustees of Joseph John Jackman, to son Samuel. He gave land on Coker’s Branch adjoining John Bruton and Samuel Cornwell to son Henry, and to Ethelred Taylor II he gave land on Lightwood Swamp (south of the Blackwater River, on the boundary between Surry and Isle of Wight Co VA), and other locations (Surry Co VA Wills and Administrations Book 7, p. 19).[lx]

All of these place names have not been relocated. However, Jackman bought his property from William Butler in 1713 (Surry Deed & Will Book 6 p155). William Butler obtained his grant in 1643 adjacent William Lawrence at the head of Lawnes’ Creek (VPB 1 p900). On 6 Apr 1647 William Lawrence had been granted “300 acres. On south of Mr. Thomas Stamp, north towards Shippeaks Creek. Lying on Hogg Island main.”[lxi] This places the Ethelred Taylor family very near Silvester Thacker (who cared for the cattle of Thomas Duke of Nansemond’s wife), Justinian Cooper, Anthony Ffulgham, and other familiar names. In 1641 Richard Jackson received land on Seawards Creek adjacent Justinian Cooper, in part by assignment from Thomas Stamp and John Sweete.[lxii] John Coker, who may have given his name to Coker’s Branch, was listed in 1635 as transported by Justinian Cooper in exchange for land at the head of Lawnes’ Creek.[lxiii] We shall see that this was also very close to John Duke of Isle of Wight Co VA.

Ethelred Taylor II lived on Lightwood Swamp in Southampton Co and married Patience Kinchen, daughter of William Kinchen and Elizabeth Joyner. In 1735 he was granted land on the Nottoway (IW DBk 4 p476-477). They had numerous children: Ethelred, Henry (married Temperance Peterson), William, John, Kinchen, Jane, James, Mary (m. Batte Peterson), Sarah, Elizabeth (m. Miles Cary), and Richard. These children and their descendants are subsequently found in close proximity to the Duke family in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Ethelred Taylor II served in the House of Burgesses from Southampton Co in 1753, 54, 55, and 1756-58. His son Henry Taylor served there in later years.

The Kinchen connection is particularly interesting. The children of William Kinchen married families with other Duke family ties. Patience Kinchen Taylor’s sister Elizabeth married Joseph Exum, son of William Exum Sr. who was entrusted with the cattle due to Margaret Duke, wife of Thomas Duke of Nansemond Co VA.

Patience Kinchen’s brother, William, married Sarah House, daughter of Robert House who was the earliest founder member of the House family in the area.[lxiv] Thomas House Jr. of Surry County was the father of Lucy House who married Maj. John Duke, eldest son of Capt. Henry Duke. His (gr?) nephew Isaac House married Mary, daughter of William Duke. Jr. and Mary Green. The following references relate to these early Houses. Robert House was the earliest founder member of the family in the area. He was granted land on Johnchecohunk Swamp.[lxv]

10 Sep 1695...Robert Howse (House), Sr of Southwarke Parish to Bartholomew Andrews of the same...250 acres on east side of Johnshohoun Swamp adjoining Robert Owins (Owen?) old line, Richard Jordan, Sr. and the Hickory Branch. (Margrett Howse wife of Robert Howse, relinquished her Right of Dower.)

Robert (X) Howse

Margrett (X) Howse

Rec: 10 Sep 1695

Thomas House Sr. was the father of Isaac House Sr., whose son Isaac House Jr. married Mary Duke. In 1723 he gave Isaac House Sr. land on Three Creeks in what became Greensville Co VA:[lxvi]

7 Nov 1723 . . . Thomas House, Sr to Isaac House . . . 60 acres on south side of Nottoway River in Lawnes Creek Parish and bounded by Three Creeks, said House, said Isaac House and Nicholas Hatch (land is the upper part of a patent granted to said Thomas House for 120 acres in 1719).

Thomas (X) House

Wit: James Washington, Lawrence (X) House and John (X) Bartholomew.

Rec. 15 Jan 1723

Thomas House Jr. was the father of Lucy House, who married Capt. John Duke, son of Capt. Henry Duke, in Greensville Co VA. Catherine House and Capt. John Duke were executors of his16 Feb 1734 will, witnessed by John Taylor Duke and David Case, and proved 4 Sep 1734.[lxvii] William Duke of Warren Co NC later married a Bartholomew. Joseph House was listed in the 1790 federal census of Dobbs/Lenoir Co.

Finally, Elizabeth married William Edwards. On 23 Mar 1715/16 William Edwards had been granted land on the Nottoway River in Isle of Wight County for transporting Elizabeth’s previous husband, Ethelred Taylor, to Virginia (VPB 10 p270). William Edwards, husband of Elizabeth Duke Mason Taylor Edwards, was granted land on Pigeon Swamp on 20 Apr 1684 (VPB 7:368).

There is no recordNo record has been found of William Edwards and Elizabeth having had children; both were older at the time of their marriage. William Edwards represented Surry Co in the House of Burgesses in 1706. He married first Elizabeth, a daughter of Col. Benjamin Harrison, a member of the Royal Council of Virginia. She died at the age of 17. Edwards apparently married a second time, perhaps to a daughter of Micajah Lowe, nephew of the prominent London merchant Micajah Perry.[lxviii] With her he had William, Micajah, Mary, Elizabeth, Ann, and Sarah. Elizabeth was apparently a third wife. His will dated 9 Jan 1722 was proved in Surry Co on 25 Feb 1722 (Surry County VA Deeds, Wills, etc. Book 9, p. 389.).[lxix] He left lands throughout Surry County in many locations, including Pigeon Creek where Elizabeth Taylor Duke inherited lands from her father Capt. John Taylor. John Edwards and Nathaniel Edwards were among the witnesses to his will.

William Duke of Brunswick Co VA and Warren Co NC

William Duke was in Brunswick Co VA on Reedy Creek, near the modern town of Lawrenceville and the historical Fort Christiana, in 1728. The earliest mention is in a deed to Capt. James Baker of Isle of Wight County, on the north side of the Maherrin River on Rocky Creek, adajcent William Duke (VPB 13:187).

A James Baker was an original trustee of Smithfield.[lxx] In 1740 James Baker was an executor, with Charles Binns and John Ruffin, of the estate of James Ransom.[lxxi] In 1739 James Baker acquired land in Isle of Wight County on the Circular Tract adajcent Benjamin Ruffin. In 1747 “James Baker Gent.” was the surveyor for a parcel in the Circular Tract, Assamasook Swamp, Southampton Co, VA, sold by the Nottoway Indians to Thomas Cocke, John Simmons, and Benjamin Edwards, and by them sold to William Bailey (IW Deed Bk 7: 244-245). Ethelred Taylor II owned land on Assamasoon Swamp, Circular Tract, by 1740/41 (IW Deed Bk 5:3-5).

On 28 Sep 1728 William Duke acquired land adjacent Nathaniel Green on Reedy Creek (VPB14p31). John Duke acquired land adjacent William Duke and James Baker on the same day (VPB14p59). John Duke sold this property to Sterling Clack in 1745 (Brunswick Co VA Deed book 3:96-98).

In 1747 Sterling Clack obtained addition land adjacent John Duke, John Edwards, and Robert Munford (VPB 28:155-156). In 1756 Charles Edwards obtained land on Reedy Creek adjacent John Edwards (VPB33p261-262). In 1762 John Edwards obtained land adjacent Charles Edwards (VPB34p1053-1054). Edward Tatum acquired land on Reedy Creek in 1756, near Robert Munford’s line and adjacent Peter Tatum (VPB33p105-106). George Standback (VPB18p168-169), Sterling Clack (VPB28p155-156), and Capt. James Baker of Isle of Wight Co (VPB13p187) also owned land in the immediate vicinity.

In 1774 Robert Ruffin was granted land on Reedy Creek previously granted to William Duke in 1728, John Duke in 1728, and Samuel Duke in 1747 (VPB42p735-737). At this time the land was adjacent Morris, Herbert, and Edwards. It is interesting that the property was being sold as one parcel.

Other relevant Brunwick Co grants: Edward Freeman received 300 acres near Thomas Eave on Buck Quarter Branch in 1768 (VPB 38:458-569). He had land near Sexton, John Knotts, John Wall as early as 23 Dec 1754 on the road to Fort Christianna (PB32p430-431). The town of Freeman, named for the family, is the only town on Reedy Creek, about 4 miles east of the present town of Lawrenceville.

William Duke’s first wife is unknown. His second wife was Elizabeth Bartholomew, widow of John Bartholomew who died in 1735 (Brunswick Co VA Deeds, Wills, Etc. Bk 1, PP. 234-235, inv. & appr. recorded 2 Oct. 1735). John Bartholomew left one son, Charles. The Bartholomews were from Prince George Co VA, as listings for an earlier Charles Bartholomew, apparently John’s father, show. The records also show that John’s mother, Rebecca Bartholomew, was an Eppes (Prince George Co, Virginia Record Book B 1693-1713):

BARTHOLOMEW, Ann

From Charles & Rebecca BARTHOLOMEW

200 acres, formerly Rebecca EPES

Deed (lease) Sep 4, 1711 Page 69

Deed (release) Sep 10, 1711

 

BARTHOLOMEW, Charles & Rebecca

To Anne BARTHOLOMEW, dau.

Granted Rebecca by patent Apr 29, 1690

(formerly EPES)

Deed (lease) Sep 4, 1711 Page 74

Deed (release) Sep 10, 1711

200 acres

 

BARTHOLOMEW, Charles & Rebecca

To Anne BARTHOLOMEW, dau

200 acres, part of land granted Rebecca (EPES)

during her widowhood, patent Apr 29, 1690

Deed (lease) Sep 4, 1711 Page 69

Deed (release) Sep 10, 1711 Page 74

Charles Barthlomew was listed on the 1704 quit rent rolls for Charles City County, VA. In 1715 he inventoried the estate of Edward Bolling, along with Gilbert Hay (Prince George County Records, 1713-1728, p. 55).[lxxii] Hay also inventoried the estate of Capt. Henry Duke. In 1718 a deed from John Roberts and Thomas Winningham to Darrel Young Jr. of Prince George County identifies Wnningham’s land as bounded by that of Charles Bartholomew, John Young, and Capt. John Poythress (Prince George County Records, 1713-1728, p.220).[lxxiii]

John Duke of Isle of Wight Co VA

George Duke was transported by John Seward of Isle of Wight Co VA, who was granted land on the Blackwater branch of the Roanoke on 15 Apr 1648 (Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 2, Page 171).

The Isle of Wight Duke family was supposedly (EDB) begun by William Ducke, who was imported by Justinian Cooper in 1639, in exchange for land at the head of Lawnes Creek (VA Land Patents Book 1, part 2, p. 681). This is probably untrue. There is no further mention of him in Isle of Wight Co VA records. The next William Duke reference known in the area is that of William Duke who married Hannah Grendon, appearing in the records in 1674, 35 years later.

John Duke I in Isle of Wight  Co VA

John Duke appears in the deed records in 1665, when Jeremiah Rutter sold 300 acres on the Cypress Swamp in what was then Nansemond Co VA to John Duke (VA Land Patent Bk. 5, p. 265). Capt. Thomas Goodwyn received a grant adjoining John Dukes, Chuckatuck Parish, Isle of Wight Co (VA Land Patent Bk. 6, p. 6 and p.111). They were living on the boundary of Isle of Wight and Nansemond counties.

In short, within two years of the first land grant to Thomas Duke in the same parish on the same river, within a few miles of one another, John Duke received his first land grant. This John Duke is very likely the brother or other close relative of Thomas Duke of Nansemond. It seems unlikely that John Duke Jr. was the only child of John Duke and Elizabeth Duke (Mercer), but others have not been identified.

On 23 Sep 1689 John Duke of Isle of Wight County sold to John Burnet, shoemaker, of the same county, “a parcel of land . . . containing fifty acres thereabouts, which land my father John Duke, deceased, formerly bought of Jeremiah Rutter of Chuckatuck then in Nansemond County, being out of a patent of three hundred acres lying and bounded by the land of John Goseling (Goslin) and the house of my father John Duke where he was situated, etc.” Witnessed by William Bradshaw and Richard Beale and signed by the marks of John Duke, Bridgett Duke (wife of John Duke, Jr.) and Elizabeth Mercer (Isle of Wight Deed Bk 1, p. 25).

Elizabeth Mercer was John Duke’s widow, remarried after his death to Robert Mercer. Robert Mercer was granted land on the Myery Branch on the south side of the Main Blackwater Swamp adjacent John Holliman and William Edwards (VPB 12 p217-218). Holliman’s land was on the boundary of Surry Co and Southampton Co (VPB 33 p611-612). In 1724/25 a William Edwards owned land adjacent Robert Mercer and John Halliman on Myery Branch on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp (VPB 12 p217-218; VPB 15 p192-193). In 1717 James Mercer had acquired land adjacent William Kinchen and George Williamson on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp (VPB 10 p371). His will was dated 1734. There are Southampton Co VA wills for a John and Robert Mercer in 1775, and another for a John Mercer in 1789.

William Boddie and his wife Elizabeth on June 9 1694 sold to Nicholas Carey land on Cypress Swamp adjacent land formerly sold to John Duke and formerly called Jackson’s Plantation.” (Isle of Wight Co VA DB 1, p.111). George Breen and William Greene witnessed the deed.

William Boddie and his wife Elizabeth Boddie of Isle of Wight County then sold to John Duke “that plantation which Henry Kinge lately lived on. The said plantation and woodland ground is bounded thus . . . over against John Jackson’s ould plantation . . . whether the plantattion be one hundred acres or two hundred acres . . . we do not know.” The deed was witnessed by Anthony Davis, William Fowler and Walter Howell and proved 21 Oct 1689 (Isle of Wight Co VA Deed Bk 1, p. 21). [lxxiv]

In 1641/42 Richard Jackson received a grant for 450 acres near Justinian Cooper, through assignment of rights from Thomas Stamp and John Sweet. Cooper’s lands were principally at the head of Lawnes Creek (VPB 1 pp. 454, 772, 874), although he owned numerous parcels in Isle of Wight County. Henry Kinge had received an 18 Apr 1688 grant for “1000 acres on the first branch of the Blackwater &c. 750 acres of this land being formerly gtd. by patt. to John Sweet dated 26th of Septr. 1643.” John Sweet received 650 acres adjacent Justinian Cooper and Francis English on the blackwater in 1642 (VPB 1 p858). [The term “the blackwater” was not confined to the Blackwater River at this time; that is usually referenced more specifically as “the main Blackwater Swamp.”) This suggests that John Duke and his family moved toward the head of Lawnes Creek in Surry Co VA. This location is very interesting, placing John Duke and his family virtually next door to Ethelred Taylor I and his wife Elizabeth Duke Mason Taylor.

In 1693 William Duke and Mary Duke witnessed a deed of gift of Thomas Mann to Sarah Mann of 100 acres on Curawaok Swamp (Isle of Wight Deed Book). This William Duke may be William Duche, Dutch founder of an Isle of Wight family. That family frequently spelled their name “Duck.”William Duck is listed in the 1704 quit rent rolls for Isle of Wight County.

On 15 Apr 1704 John Duke of Isle of Wight Co witnessed a will including a bequest for land purchased from Edmond Palmer, John Portis, Sr., and Henry Martin, subsequently probated 9 Jan 1706[lxxv]:

"Jones, Ann: Leg. son John the 300 A. purchased of Edmond Palmer, John Portis, Sr. and Henry Martin; son Abraham; son John's three children, Joseph, John and Ann; Daughter Ann Barnes. Capt. Arthur Smith and Henry Applewhite, Overseers. D. April 15, 1704. R. January 9, 1706/7. Witnesses: John Watts, John Duke, Henry Applewhite." Page 477

On 5 Feb 1672 Edmund Palmer received a grant for land in Isle of Wight Co near John Portis, Arthur Smith, Anthony Matthews and “Mr. Bodies” [Boddie] (VPB 6 p443). John Portis and Henry West were granted 900 acres in 1673, situated on “some of the Blackwater branches.”[lxxvi] In 1684 Palmer’s land adjoined a 3350 acre grant to William Boddie between the western branch of the Nansemond and the Cypress Swamp (VPB 7 p394-395). On 28 Oct 1643 Henry Watts received 157 acres on Pagan Point Creek.[lxxvii] In 1674 Henry Applewhite was granted 300 acres in Isle of Wight county adjacent Robert Edwards and William Bodie.[lxxviii] It is likely that this property was close to Cypress Swamp, probably on the western side. [Robert Edwards was, with his brother James, founder of a large Isle of Wight Edwards family without a known connection to the family of William Edwards who was the third husband of Elizabeth Duke Mason Taylor.]

A later deed indicates a Seacock and Lightwood Swamp area location for a descendant of the original John Portis:[lxxix]

John Phillips of Surry County, Virginia to Benjamin Holden dated 7 Nov 1751. 20 acres on the south side of Seacock Swamp adj. Lightwood Swamp, Bartholomew Andrews, John Portis, Joseph John Ravells, and Long Branch (patent to sd. John on 29 Aug 1757), S: John Phillips, W: no witnesses

In 1713 Richard Jackson acquired land on the Blackwater Swamp near Edward Boykin (VPB 10 p99-100). A later deed to Thomas Moore shows that this grant was near Terrapin Swamp, a tributary of the Blackwater near the Surry County boundary (VPB 12 p451). In 1734 Joseph Turner was granted land adjacent William Kinchen and Edward Boykin on Tuckers Swamp (VPB 15 p344). On 25 Sep 1750 Thomas Joyner was granted land on the south side of the Blackwater Swamp adjacent Edward Kinchen and Joseph Turner (VPB 33 p963-964).

 In 1725 a John Jackson with later Duke family ties lived near William Kinchen on Meadow Branch, Isle of Wight Co, VA, and consequently near Robert Mercer and Elizabeth Duke Mercer:

ref VPB 12 p448-449

dat 24 Mar 1725/26

frm Hugh Drysdale

to John Jackson of Isle of Wight County

con 15 Shill.

re 145a on the S side of the Main Blackwater Swamp in sd Co.

loc 127080 -39560 F127 L0 P255

pt A) pine on the E side of the Meadow branch a Corner Tree

!of William Kinchins Land

!thence Crossing the Branch by Kinchins Line

ln S75W; 86P; William Kinchin Cross Meadow Br.

. . .

And also near Robert Harris:

typ patent

ID eSN#

ref VPB 26 p579-581

dat 20 Aug 1748

to Thomas Atkinson

con 35 Shill.

re 350a Isle of Wight Co. on the S side of the Main Blackwater Sw.

loc 127094 -39721 F127 L0 P255

pt A) pine on the E side of the Meadow Branch a Corner of

!William Kinchin's and James Atkinson's Lands

ln N75E; 22P; James Atkinson, frm Wm Kinchin's c.

pt B) red oak

ln S60E; 98P;

pt C) Lightwood post

ln NExE; 144P;

pt D) pine

ln N; 174P;

pt E) pine a line tree of Robert Harris's Land

ln S70W; 176P; Robert Harris

. . .

pt I) maple on the side of the Meadow Branch

!a Corner Tree of John Jacksons Land

!and down the Run of sd Branch to the beginning

lm ;; down Meadow Br. fm John Jackson's c.

end

And

Southampton Co Deed Book. Pages 86-88: John and William Jackson to John Clayton, joiner, dated 8 Jan 1756

145 acres on the north side of the main Blackwater Swamp adj. The east side of Meadow Branch and William Kinchen (land taken up by John Jackson), S: John (I) Jackson and William (I) Jackson, W: Richard (signed) Kello, Thomas (signed) Williamson, and Richard (signed) Baker

Ethelred Taylor, husband of Elizabeth Duke Taylor, left land on Lightwood Swamp to his son Ethelred Taylor II, who married Patience Kinchen.[lxxx] Lightwood Swamp is immediately south of the Blackwater along the Surry Co border. Thomas Williamson was the son of George Williamson Sr. and Hester Bridger, daughter of Joseph Bridger and Hester Pitt. George Williamson was the son of Robert Williamson and Joan Allen. George Williamson’s land was adajcent that of William Kinchen and the Mercer family (VPB 10 p371). In 1725 John Jackson received land adjacent William Kinchen (VPB 12: 448-449). Richard Jackson also owned land on Tarapin Branch (VPB 12 p451).

John Duke Jr. and his wife Bridget had sons James, John and Robert Duke. His daughters’ names are unknown. His will was recorded on 3 Aug 1720 (Isle of Wight Co VA Great Book p. 53, part 2). An inventory of his estate was returned by Bridgett Dukes, Administratrix, and recorded on 27 Feb 1720/21 (Isle of Wight Co VA Wills, Deeds, etc. Great Book 147- 1800, part 2, page 67.) Given the location of John Duke’s land and also of Elizabeth Duke Mercer, he would have been well acquainted with the families of Ethelred Taylor and Elizabeth Duke Taylor, of the Kinchens, Jacksons, Williamsons, Harris, Claytons and so forth.

 

John Duke and his mother Bridgett Duke were in Brunswick Co VA by 1728, where he was an adjoining landholder to John Jackson and also to William Duke. John Duke obtained a grant Sep 28, 1728 (VPB14p59), as did William Duke. William Reynolds “of Brunswick Co” obtained a grant adjacent Ralph Jackson the same day (VPB 14:34-35). Ralph Jackson’s grant was 7 Jul 1726 (VPB12p520). Thomas Jackson received a grant the same day (VPB12p520). John Jackson may have been in the area earlier.

William Kimball of Surry Co received land on Rocky Creek adjacent James Baker and Col. Harrison on 28 Sep 1728 (VPB14p27-28). Nathaniel Green of Surry Co received land on Reedy Creek on the same day (VPB14p67). Peter Tatum “of Prince George” received land on Reedy Creek adjacent the Jacksons (VPB14p76). Peter Tatum was originally from Sussex Co. Ephraim Parham received land on Reedy Creek (VPB13p358-359). The Parhams owned land in Sussex Co adajcent on Southwestern Swamp adajcent William Rainey, Joseph Tucker, and James Cain (CGB N p1). John Hicks of Surry was granted land on the north side of the Maherrin on the same day (28 Sep1728), as did Henry Harrison (PB14p535).

A grant to Ralph Jackson “of Surry County” on Reedy Creek was dated 1726 (VPB12p520), as was one to Thomas Jackson (VPB12p520). Ralph Jackson seems to have been associated with the Eppes family. Ralph Jackson received a land grant in Bristol Parish, Charles City County, with grant in 1692. John Dugles and Joseph Maddox, on 29 Apr 1692 (Land Office Patents No. 8, 1689-1695, p. 244, Reel 8.). In 1713 he received land from John and Rebecca Jackson of Prince George Co VA (Prince George County VA Record Book B 1693-1713, p. 244):

JACKSON, Ralph

From John JACKSON &

Rebecca JACKSON

100 acres ( formerly Henry KING) adj.

To George WILLIAMS line

Oct 12, 1713

Ralph Jackson died in Brunswick Co and his will of 4 Apr 1744 was witnessed by Bridget Duke, John Douglas, and James Robinson and proved by the oaths of John Duke and Bridget Duke (Brunswick Co VA Will Bk 2, pp. 100-101). Note that John Douglas shared his Bristol parish land grant in 1692.

John Jackson grants on Reedy Creek in Brunswick Co VA are well documented (VPB13p358-359, VPB19p671-672). John Duke witnessed some of his land transactions:

Indenture made the 1st day of October, 1747, between John Jackson, Sr., and Mary Jackson, his wife, of Albemarle Parrish, County of Surry, and John Jackson, Jr., of St. Andrews Parrish, County of Brunswick, for 5 pounds, conveying 195 acres, located on East side of Reedy Branch, corner of Edward Accols land, and also adjoining land of Thomas Wilson. Witnesses were John Duke, Thomas Embry, and John Mabry. Acknowledged in Court on October 1, 1747. Deed Book 3, page 346.

Indenture made the 1st day of October, 1747, between Edward Accollo and Mary Accollo, his wife, of Albemarle Parrish, County of Surry, and John Jackson, Jr., for 5 pounds, conveying 400 acres, on Reedy Branch. Witnesses were John Duke, Thomas Embry, and John Mabry. Acknowledged in Court on October 1, 1747. Deed Book 3, page 347.

Peter Tatum of Surry County also obtained a grant on Reedy Creek on 28 Sep 1728, adjacent Thomas Jackson (VPB14p76), and another in 1748 (VPB26p562-563). One genforum posting suggests Thomas may have been a son of John Jackson, and that a younger Ralph Jackson was another son.

John Duke was also associated with the Perry family in Brunswick Co VA:

Indenture made 27 July 1745, between Francis Price of Brunswick County and John Butts of same, £25, land whereon John Bush now lives, 447a, being a moiety of a larger tract of land granted to John Duke by Letters Patent dated 24 March 1734 & by the sd,. John Duke sold and conveyed to Thomas Collier & by the sd. Collier sold & conveyed to the sd. Francis Price. Signed Francis Price. Witnesses: Thomas Lanier, Micajah Perry, Peter Adams (bhm). Court August 1, 1745, Indenture proved by oaths of Thomas Lanier, Gent. & Micajah Perry. Court May 6, 1747, Indenture acknowledged by Francis Price. Deed Book 3, Page 314.

In 1789 Benjamin Perry was associated with the Duke family in Fairfield Co SC (Kershaw District, SC Probate, Apartment 56, Package 1858).

William Duke of Brunswick Co VA and Warren Co NC

DNA studies have placed this William Duke in the family of John Duke of Isle of Wight County, VA.[lxxxi]

William Duke was in Brunswick Co VA on Reedy Creek, near the modern town of Lawrenceville and the historical Fort Christiana, in 1728. The earliest mention is in a deed to Capt. James Baker of Isle of Wight County, on the north side of the Maherrin River on Rocky Creek, adajcent William Duke (VPB 13:187).

A James Baker was an original trustee of Smithfield.[lxxxii] In 1740 James Baker was an executor, with Charles Binns and John Ruffin, of the estate of James Ransom.[lxxxiii] In 1739 James Baker acquired land in Isle of Wight County on the Circular Tract adajcent Benjamin Ruffin. In 1747 “James Baker Gent.” surveyed a parcel in the Circular Tract, Assamasook Swamp, Southampton Co, VA, sold by the Nottoway Indians to Thomas Cocke, John Simmons, and Benjamin Edwards, and by them sold to William Bailey (IW Deed Bk 7: 244-245). Ethelred Taylor II owned land on Assamasoon Swamp, Circular Tract, by 1740/41 (IW Deed Bk 5:3-5).

On 28 Sep 1728 William Duke acquired land adjacent Nathaniel Green on Reedy Creek (VPB14p31). John Duke acquired land adjacent William Duke and James Baker on the same day (VPB14p59). John Duke sold this property to Sterling Clack in 1745 (Brunswick Co VA Deed book 3:96-98).

In 1747 Sterling Clack obtained addition land adjacent John Duke, John Edwards, and Robert Munford (VPB 28:155-156). In 1756 Charles Edwards obtained land on Reedy Creek adjacent John Edwards (VPB33p261-262). In 1762 John Edwards obtained land adjacent Charles Edwards (VPB34p1053-1054). Edward Tatum acquired land on Reedy Creek in 1756, near Robert Munford’s line and adjacent Peter Tatum (VPB33p105-106). George Standback (VPB18p168-169), Sterling Clack (VPB28p155-156), and Capt. James Baker of Isle of Wight Co (VPB13p187) also owned land in the immediate vicinity.

In 1774 Robert Ruffin was granted land on Reedy Creek previously granted to William Duke in 1728, John Duke in 1728, and Samuel Duke in 1747 (VPB42p735-737). At this time the land was adjacent Morris, Herbert, and Edwards. It is interesting that the property was being sold as one parcel.

Other relevant Brunwick Co grants: Edward Freeman received 300 acres near Thomas Eave on Buck Quarter Branch in 1768 (VPB 38:458-569). He had land near Sexton, John Knotts, John Wall as early as 23 Dec 1754 on the road to Fort Christianna (PB32p430-431). The town of Freeman, named for the family, is the only town on Reedy Creek, about 4 miles east of the present town of Lawrenceville.

William Duke’s first wife is unknown. His second wife was Elizabeth Bartholomew, widow of John Bartholomew who died in 1735 (Brunswick Co VA Deeds, Wills, Etc. Bk 1, PP. 234-235, inv. & appr. recorded 2 Oct. 1735). John Bartholomew left one son, Charles. The Bartholomews were from Prince George Co VA, as listings for an earlier Charles Bartholomew, apparently John’s father, show. The records also show that John’s mother, Rebecca Bartholomew, was an Eppes (Prince George Co, Virginia Record Book B 1693-1713):

Bartholomew, Ann

From Charles & Rebecca Bartholomew

200 acres, formerly Rebecca EPES

Deed (lease) Sep 4, 1711 Page 69

Deed (release) Sep 10, 1711

 

Bartholomew, Charles & Rebecca

To Anne Bartholomew, dau.

Granted Rebecca by patent Apr 29, 1690

(formerly Epes)

Deed (lease) Sep 4, 1711 Page 74

Deed (release) Sep 10, 1711

200 acres

 

Bartholomew, Charles & Rebecca

To Anne Bartholomew, dau

200 acres, part of land granted Rebecca (Epes)

during her widowhood, patent Apr 29, 1690

Deed (lease) Sep 4, 1711 Page 69

Deed (release) Sep 10, 1711 Page 74

Charles Barthlomew was listed on the 1704 quit rent rolls for Charles City County, VA. In 1715 he inventoried the estate of Edward Bolling, along with Gilbert Hay (Prince George County Records, 1713-1728, p. 55).[lxxxiv] Hay also inventoried the estate of Capt. Henry Duke. In 1718 a deed from John Roberts and Thomas Winningham to Darrel Young Jr. of Prince George County identifies Wnningham’s land as bounded by that of Charles Bartholomew, John Young, and Capt. John Poythress (Prince George County Records, 1713-1728, p.220).[lxxxv]

Documented

Sons of John Duke the Elder

The sons of John Duke the Elder include John Duke Jr., who married Mary Duggar (Brunswick Co VA Will Book 7, p. 467). John Duke Jr. did not leave Virginia until 1774, He appears on the 1776 tax list of Bute County. John Duke the Elder and his wife Ruth left Burnswick Co VA and moved to Bute Co NC. On 1 mar 1762 John Duke bought from William Duke 500 acres of land in Bute County. This was witnessed by Benjamin Duke and Bed. Green (Bute Co NC Deed Bk 2, p. 211).

In Feb 1775 the hands of Benjamin and Jacob Duke were ordered to work on the road from Hawtree to Robert Caller (Bute Co Minute Book). Samuel Duke(s) Jr. left a will in Muhlenburg County KY in which he identifies sons John, Sampson, Jacob, William, and Benjamin and daughters Elizabeth Groves and Pashence Williams.[lxxxvi]

In 1779 John Duke the Elder sold land in Bute Co NC to Lewis Scarbrough, with witnesses Simon, Benjamin, and Joel Duke (Warren Co NC Deed Bk 7, p. 228). These were sons of John Duke the Elder.

Sons of John Duke Jr.  in Bertie County NC

James and Robert Duke, sons of John Duke of Isle of Wight Co VA, were in Bertie Precinct NC in 1739. This James Duke is almost certainly the one who was in Surry Co and Brunswick Co VA in the interim.

On 1 Nov 1730 Bartholomew Shavers deeded 200 acres of land on the Roanoke (Marrotoch) River to Benjamin Duke and Henry Wooten (Bertie CO NC Deed Book C, p. 293). A Robert Duke grant in Bertie County NC followed in 1737:

13 Feb. 1737, Bertie County Grants E, 202

Richard Pace, Jr. to Robert Dukes 200 acres (part of a patent to John Green of 640 acres on northside of Yawmehoke Swamp on 1 March 1719, part of patent sole to Ralph Mason and from Mason to Richard Pace, Sr. and part sold to Bartholomew Chavas then from Chavas to Barnaby Mackinne, Sr. and this part from John Green to Richard Pace, Jr. for 200 acres; then to Robert Dukes so that all Robert Duke’s part of patent is on the northside of Yawmehoke Swamp. (The Yawmehoke Swamp is the bonds between Richard Pace, Sr. and Barnabe Mackinne.)

The 1739/40 list of jurymen for Bertie Precinct, North Carolina contains the names of Benjamin Duke, Robert Duke, and James Duke. Robert and James were the brothers of John Duke the Elder of Brunswick Co VA, and Benjamin Duke was a son of Robert Duke.

After 1741 Robert Duke’s land was in Northampton Co NC. On 4 Aug 1761 Robert Duke Sr. sold to Robert Duke Jr., 100 aces adjoining the land of John Thomas (Northampton Co NC Deed Book 3, p. 84). Robert Duke Sr. married Isabel Vinson, daughter of Thomas Vinson.

The 1763 will of Robert Duke of Northampton County NC provided for sons Samuel, Benjamin, John, and Robert and daughters Elizabeth Fullen, Monen, and Mille. [lxxxvii]

In 1778 Robert Duke Jr. “of the County of Halifax” was executor of his mother’s estate, establishing that he was still in North Carolina at this time (Northampton Co NC Deed Bk 7, p. 366).

James Duke of Stanley County, NC was a Revolutionary War soldier who in his pension application noted that he was born in 1764 in Northampton Co NC, and that his father died when he was about 18 months of age. This conforms to the death of Robert Duke Sr.[lxxxviii]

Benjamin Duke disappeared from North Carolina records and might be the Benjamin Duke found in the Georgetown SC area in 1745.

Samuel Duke appears in the early Bertie County records, witnessing a deed from William Baldwin to John Williams on 12 Jan 1735.[lxxxix] This individual is too early to be a son of William Duke of Brunswick Co VA and Warren Co NC. A Samuel Duke was on the Tax List of Halifax Co NC (adjoining Northampton) in 1781; this may be the same individual or a son. William and Matthew Kinchen were also present in early Bertie County, acquiring land with James Turner. J.Edwards was witness.[xc]

(Samuel Duke who EDB believed to be the son of William Duke was on the Granville Co list of titheables for 1750 and 1755, and on the muster roll for the militia in 1754. EDB states that a court paper from Granville Co. identifies William Duke as security for a debt by Samuel Duke.[xci] Samuel’s sons names were Britain, Burwell, Starling, and Harrell, as well as descendants with the given name Green. Samuel may have married a daughter of William or Nathaniel Green, since the name Green is common in his line. )

 

 

DNA Studies

Important information on these families has been obtained through yDNA studies. Details are available at:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dukedna/dukedna.htm

 

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[i] Isle of Wight County VA Records. William and Mary College Historical Quarterly Magazine, Vol. 7, No. 4, P. 291.

[ii] Land Office Patents No. 2, 1643-1651, p. 263 (Reel 2).

[iii] Land Office Patents No. 3, 1652-1655, p. 388 (Reel 2).

[iv] Land Office Patents No. 4, 1655-1664, p. 601 (Reel 4).

[v] Land Office Patents No. 11, 1719-1724, p. 248 (Reel 10).

[vi] Isle of Wight Co VA Deed Bk 5, p. 203.

[vii] Chuckatuck, Virginia Friend Meeting. Early Quaker Records in Virginia. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1977.

[viii] Virginia Genealogical Society pq 101, Norfleet Riddick Papers, Nugent II 193-194.

[ix] VA Land Patents Book 1, part 2, p. 681.

[x] Genealogy.com. Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, Charles City County Court Orders and Fragments, 1664-1696, Page 351.

[xi] Colonial Abstracts. Fleet, Vol. 13, Charles City County, 1664-1696, p. 89. Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, Charles City County Court Orders and Fragments, 1664-1696, Page 330, 352.

[xii] Surry County, Virginia Record Book, Bk 2, p. 19.

Morris, Jane. Surry County Order Book, 1671-1692, p. 16.

[xiii] Morris, Jane. Surry County Order Book, 1671-1692, p. 515.

[xiv] Boddie, John B. 2000. Colonial Surry. Baltimore: Clearfield Publishing Company. Pages 91-92.

[xv] Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, Charles City County Court Orders and Fragments, 1664-1696, Page 335, 347, 352.

[xvi] Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, Charles City County Court Orders and Fragments, 1664-1696, Page 330, 352.

[xvii] Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, Charles City County Court Orders and Fragments, 1664-1696, Page 352.

[xviii] S. R. Number SR 03775b. Reel Number 448. Repository Public Records Office Class E 190/62/5. Title Port Books; Port of London; Searcher; Exports from London by English Merchants. Dates 1674-1675. Name Duke, Wm. -- 1675, SR 03775b, p. 66.

[xix] Surry Co VA Deed and Will Book 3:10, 3:43.

[xx] Jane Morris, Virginia Magazine of History, Vol. 4, October, 1896, "Narrative of Bacon's Rebellion", pp 5-13.

[xxi] "Defense of Colonel Edward Hill", Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, June 1896, Vol. IV, pp. 248-249

[xxii] VPB 7:110.

[xxiii] Jane Morris, op. cit. Surry County, Virginia, Record Book 2, page 238, 1679.

[xxiv] Genealogy.com. Virginia Colonial Abstracts. Vol. III, Henrico County – Southside, 1736, p.380.

[xxv] Genealogy.com. Historical Collections of Virginia. Amelia county, page 173.

[xxvi] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III. 1994. Prince George County Virginia Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Company. Page 100.

[xxvii] Historical Southern Families, Vol. IV, Duke of Durham County, North Carolina, Page 174

[xxviii] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III. 1994. Prince George County Virginia Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Company. Page 52.

[xxix] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III. 1994. Prince George County Virginia Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Company. Page 99.

[xxx] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III. 1994. Prince George County Virginia Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Company. Page 76.

[xxxi] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III. 1994. Prince George County Virginia Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Company. Page 130.

[xxxii] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III. 1994. Prince George County Virginia Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Company. Page 136.

[xxxiii] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III. 1994. Prince George County Virginia Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Company. Page 143-144.

[xxxiv] Duke, Walter Garland. Henry Duke, Councillor. Page 269.

[xxxv] Brandenberger, Evelyn Duke. The Duke Family. Houston: EDB. Page 295.

[xxxvi] Davis, Eliza Timberlake. 1980. Surry County records: Surry County, Virginia, 1652-1684. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.

[xxxvii] Wright, Louis B. and Marion Tinling,eds. 1958. William Byrd of Virginia: The London Diary (1717-1721) and Other Writings. New York: Oxford University Press. Pages 378, 382, 388, 389, 393, 404, 405, 408, 414, 416, 425, 426, 434, 435, 443, 444, 445, 448, 449, 450, 452, 460, 500, 03, 505, 508, 516, and 517.

[xxxviii] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III. 1994. Prince George County Virginia Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Company. Page 173.

[xxxix] Brunswick Co VA Will Bk 1: 74. Brunswick Co., VA., Will Bk 1: 185.

[xl] Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 1: 106.

[xli] VPB 20: 135.

[xlii] Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 2: 277-279 and 281.

[xliii] Brunswick Co VA Deed Bk 2: 251.

[xliv] Brandenberger, Evelyn Duke. The Duke Family. Houston: EDB. Page 305.

[xlv] Hollowak, Thomas L.,ed. Taylor of Southampton. Genealogies of Virginia Families from The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Vol. V: Randolph-Zouch. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Pp 386-397.

[xlvi] Davis, Eliza Timberlake. 1980. Surry County records: Surry County, Virginia, 1652-1684. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Page 137.

[xlvii] Brandenberger, Evelyn Duke. The Duke Family. Houston: EDB. Page 430-431.

[xlviii] Brandenberger, Evelyn Duke. The Duke Family. Houston: EDB. Page 18.

[xlix] Duke, Walter Garland. Henry Duke, Councillor. Page 44.

[l] Land Office Patents No. 2, 1643-1651, p. 88 (Reel 2).

[li] Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 653 (Reel 6).

[lii] VPB 5 p.378, VPB 6 p107, VPB 7 p576.

[liii] Land Office Patents No. 7, 1679-1689 (v.1 & 2 p.1-719), p. 183 (Reel 7).

[liv] Boddie, Southside Virginia Families, Vol. II. Page 123.

[lv] Surry Co VA Wills and Administrations Book 6, p. 93.

[lvi] Hollowak, Thomas L.,ed. Taylor of Southampton. Genealogies of Virginia Families from The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Vol. V: Randolph-Zouch. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. P. 386-387.

[lvii] Hollowak, Thomas L.,ed. Taylor of Southampton. Genealogies of Virginia Families from The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Vol. V: Randolph-Zouch. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. P. 386.

[lviii] Surry County VA Deeds, Wills, etc. Book 6, p.16.

[lix] Boddie, John B. 2000. Colonial Surry. Baltimore: Clearfield Publishing Company.

[lx] Davis, Eliza Timberlake. 1980. Surry County records: Surry County, Virginia, 1652-1684. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Pages 127-128.

[lxi] Patents Issued during the Regal Government. 1901. William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 10, Issue 2. P. 94.

[lxii] VPB 1 p772.

[lxiii] VPB 1 p380-381

[lxiv] Hopkins, William Lindsay. 1994. Surry County Virginia Deeds, 1684-1733 and other Court Papers. Athens: Iberian. P. 128.

[lxv] Hopkins, William Lindsay. 1994. Surry County Virginia Deeds, 1684-1733 and other Court Papers. Athens: Iberian. P. 46.

[lxvi] Hopkins, William Lindsay. 1994. Surry County Virginia Deeds, 1684-1733 and other Court Papers. Athens: Iberian. P. 123.

[lxvii] Brunswick Co VA Will Bk 1, p. 185.

[lxviii] Edwards Family. In William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 15, Issue 2 (Oct 1906). Pages 79-83.

[lxix] Davis, Eliza Timberlake. 1980. Surry County records: Surry County, Virginia, 1652-1684. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Pages 46-47.

[lxx] Isle of Wight County VA Records; William and Mary College Historical Quarterly Magazine, Vol. 7, No. 4, P.215.

[lxxi] Ransom Family. Oct 1905. William and Mary College Historical Quarterly Magazine, Vol. 14, No. 2, P.129-130.

[lxxii] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III ed. 1994. Prince George County VA Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Co. P. 8.

[lxxiii] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III ed. 1994. Prince George County VA Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Co. P. 33.

[lxxiv] Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 117 (Reel 6).

[lxxv] Isle of Wight County Wills Bk 2, page 477. (Genealogical Records: Virginia Land, Marriage, and Probate Records, 1639-1850).

[lxxvi] Isle of Wight County VA Records. Apr 1899. William and Mary College Historical Quarterly, Vol. 7, No. 4, P. 303.

[lxxvii] Isle of Wight County VA Records. Apr 1899. William and Mary College Historical Quarterly, Vol. 7, No. 4, P.295.

[lxxviii] Isle of Wight County VA Records. Apr 1899. William and Mary College Historical Quarterly, Vol. 7, No. 4, P. 303.

[lxxix] Southampton Co VA Deed Book 2: Pages 191-193

[lxxx] Davis, Eliza Timberlake. 1980. Surry County records: Surry County, Virginia, 1652-1684. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Pages 127-128.

[lxxxi] Duke/Dukes Surname Study. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dukedna/dukedna.html

[lxxxii] Isle of Wight County VA Records; William and Mary College Historical Quarterly Magazine, Vol. 7, No. 4, P.215.

[lxxxiii] Ransom Family. Oct 1905. William and Mary College Historical Quarterly Magazine, Vol. 14, No. 2, P.129-130.

[lxxxiv] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III ed. 1994. Prince George County VA Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Co. P. 8.

[lxxxv] Weisinger, Benjamin B. III ed. 1994. Prince George County VA Wills and Deeds 1713-1728. Athens: Iberian Publishing Co. P. 33.

[lxxxvi] Brandenberger, Evelyn Duke. 1979. The Duke Family. Houston: EDB. Page143.

[lxxxvii] Northampton Co NC Will Bk A, part 1, p. 35.

[lxxxviii] Brandenberger, Evelyn Duke. 1979. The Duke Family. Houston: EDB. Page 403.

[lxxxix] Bertie Co NC Deed Book E 1736-39, Pt. 1, p. 22.

[xc] Bertie Co NC Deed Book E 1736-39 Pt. 1. P. 39.

[xci] Brandenberger, Evelyn Duke. 1979. The Duke Family. Houston: EDB. Page 51.