Du guŽ/DuguŽ/Dugue/Duque/Duke Families in the Charleston SC Area

Introduction

The notes that follow document various individuals named Du GuŽ, DuguŽ, Dugue, and Duque who have been recorded in the Charleston, SC, and Kingston, Jamaica, areas by 1750. There is substantial evidence that most constitute a single family. The DuguŽs were Huguenots, and are documented in the St. Julien and Gaillard lists.

Research on this family has produced documentation of a family history with an unusual twist. Normally the women of a family are the most difficult to trace. In this case, the women of the DuguŽ family married individuals who were prominent in South Carolina, and their descendants have been amply documented for many years. In contrast, the two sons of Jacques DuguŽ who survived to have sons of their own, Pierre (Peter) and Isaac, lived for many years in Jamaica, where they seem to have encountered serious difficulties, especially in the catastrophic year 1722. When sons of Isaac and perhaps Peter as well returned to South Carolina, shortly after the death of Isaac Dugue, most of them (but not all) did so under the spelling Duke rather than Dugue.

There are a few individuals identified as ÒDukeÓ in the early South Carolina lowcountry who are hard to place. They might or might not be from the DuguŽ family. However, for at least five individuals (Joseph Duke of Orangeburg, James Dugue of Charleston, Thomas Goodman Duke of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, William Duke of Christ Church Parish, and Benjamin Duke of Prince Frederick Parish) the evidence is strong.  One author has been found who had already recognized that the early Duke family of South Carolina was of Huguenot descent, in an inventory of South Carolina grants to Huguenots.[1]

The following summary documents the early years of this family, beginning with a review of existing published summaries and continuing with new research in primary documents. Continuing associations between the DuguŽs (under their various spellings) and other families from the Charleston area are important in tracing the continuity in this family as they spread out in the 1730Õs through 1750Õs.

DuguŽ Family in France

The following listings were found on Geneanet for the Dugue family in Buzancais, 36, Dept. Indre, Region Centre:

1.  Claude Dugue & 1668 Germain PHELIPPES (submitted by Francois.louzeau@free.fr)

The following family record was found on Geneanet (http://gw.geneanet.org/msauvegrain). The location is in Centre, and thus near Besance (Buzanais, Dept. Indre Region Centre), the point of origin of the South Carolina family, and the names Jacques and Pierre are held in common:

Jacques DuguŽ

 

       ¥              NŽ avant 1694

       ¥              DŽcŽdŽ

 

Parents

                    Pierre DuguŽ /1643-/1722

       ¥              Marie Maslard ca 1694-1771

 

Mariages et enfants

       ¥               MariŽ le 19 avril 1715, Sceaux-du-G‰tinais, 45490,Loiret,Centre,FRANCE,,  avec Marie Harlault ca 1696-1730, dont

       ¥              HŽlne  ca 1719-1772

There is also:

Thomasse DuguŽ

 

       ¥              NŽe vers 1590 - Beaune-la-Rolande,45340,Loiret,Centre,FRANCE,

       ¥              DŽcŽdŽe aprs 1644 - Juranville,45340,Loiret,Centre,FRANCE,

 

Mariages et enfants

                     MariŽe avant 1606, Beaune-la-Rolande,45340,Loiret,Centre,FRANCE,,  avec Jean Penot /1587-1624/1639, dont

       ¥              Antoine  1611-1666

                    MariŽe le 31 juillet 1639, Beaune-la-Rolande,45340,Loiret,Centre,FRANCE,,  avec SŽbastien Henry /1590-1650/

The database includes:

1.

o Barbe ca 1590-1661  &ca 1610 Jacques Miguet ca 1585-1644/1661

2.

o Eloy /1580  &/1601 Margueritte Colinet /1584

o Charles /1602  &1623 Jeanne Courreau /1601

o Toussine /1638  &1655 Jean Gouron /1634

3.

o Franois /1603-1634/1639  &1623 Marie Pesty 1606-1672

4.

o Jeanne /1575-1609  &/1592 Michel Mestier /1571-1616

5.

o Jeanne ca 1593-1673  &/1621 Marc Gommier /1600-1673/

6.

o Louise /1658  &1677 Pierre Gagnon /1656-/1699

7.

o Marie /1687-1734/1777  &1700/1707 Franois Morillon 1682-1716

o Marie /1687-1734/1777  &1716/ Antoine Legroux /1696-1734/

8.

o Marie Jeanne 1665-1704  &1683 Jean Pesty 1654-1713

9.

o Martine /1576-1637/  &/1593 Jean Rapine /1572-/1637

10.

o Pierre /1643-/1722  &1718 Marie Maslard ca 1694-1771

o Jacques /1694  &1715 Marie Harlault ca 1696-1730

o HŽlne ca 1719-1772  &1740 Joseph Cossat 1708-1774

11.

o Thomasse ca 1590-1644/  &/1606 Jean Penot /1587-1624/1639

o Thomasse ca 1590-1644/  &1639 SŽbastien Henry /1590-1650/

DuguŽ Family in the Charleston Area

The DuguŽ family arrived in South Carolina in 1685, following revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Members of the DuguŽ family appear in both the St. Julien and Gaillard lists of Huguenot settlers in South Carolina.

The St. Julien List:[2]

15. PIERRE DUGUƒ, Isaac Dugue, son frre, et ƒlizabeth DuguŽ, leur sŸur, nŽz ˆ BŽsance en Bery, enfans de Jacques DuguŽ et d'ƒlizabet Dupuy. 

ÒBesanceÓ appears as ÒBuzancoisÓ on the Cassini maps of historic France, immediately south of St. Etienne on the Indres River.

Previously Published DuguŽ Family Summaries

Several very brief summaries of the DuguŽ family history in South Carolina have been published.

St. Julien Childs

The DuguŽ family and its connections are discussed by St. Julien Childs in his history of the Petit-GuŽrard Colony, which immigrated in 1679/80.[3] Childs reports that Jacques DuguŽ and his families emigrated later, in 1685, but were associated with the Fleury family in the earlier Petit-GuŽrard group. Jacques DuguŽ first married Judith Soupzmain, Soubmain, or Soumin, and second Elizabeth de Puy. His son, James, married Marianne Fleury de la Plaine, born in Paris and daughter of Abraham Fleury de la Plaine. They were among the settlers on the Richmond. By 17 Jan 1695/96 Marianne DuguŽ was a widow with one child born in South Carolina, Jacques DuguŽ II having died. She remarried to Peter Bacot, and her daughter Marianne married Tobias Fitch.

Rev. Paul Trapier

A 1953 article by the Rev. Paul Trapier expands upon and clarifies some of these relationships.[4] According to Trapier, Jacques DuguŽ escaped to England by 17 Apr 1685, when he purchased 500 acres of land in South Carolina. He was there at his land on New Town (Newtown) Creek in the same year. His wife, Elizabeth Du Puy DuguŽ, is said to have been a fugitive and was concealed in a hogshead marked ÒPoterieÓ and then conveyed on board the vessel in which she reached America. Trapier identifies the oldest children – Jacques (who predeceased him), Judith, and Marie, as childen of DuguŽÕs first wife, Judith Soumin. The others – Pierre, Isaac, and Elizabeth – he identifies as children of Elizabeth Du Puy DuguŽ. Trapier confirms that Elizabeth married Paul Trapier, Judith married Samuel DuBourdieu, and Mary married James Du Bosc (Dubose). The five oldest children were born in BŽsance in Berri, France.

Excerpts from Rev. TrapierÕs diary indicate that Paul Trapier, son of Paul Trapier and Elizabeth DuguŽ, married Magdalen Horry. Their son Paul married Elizabeth Foissin.[5]

Virginia Gourdin

Gourdin gives another brief survey of the DuguŽ family in her history of the Chardon family.[6] She states that Jacques DuguŽÕs first land was on James Island, but he was soon acquiring town lots in Charleston. He paid for a 500-acre tract on the northwest side of New Town Creek on James Island on 31 Mar 1683, but the warrant is dated 14 Apr 1685. Gourdin proposes that Judith Soumin was the mother of Judith and probably of Jacques, Jr., and Marie, while Elizabeth Dupuy was the mother of Pierre, Isaac and Elizabeth. She also states that his son James may have gone to Goose Creek after marrying Marianne Fleury (but see the later discussion of questions about James DuguŽ of Goose Creek). A James DuguŽ witnessed the will of Anthoine Prudhomme, dated July 1695, along with ÒPrioleau, de la Plaine, Boisseau, I. Fleury, EliŽ Horry, and Porcher.Ó She notes that his daughter Marianne married Pierre Bacot Jr., of Goose Creek.

Gourdin observes that ÒSome are unhappy about not finding the two Jacques DuguŽs in the St. Julien Liste,Ó which is a list of ŽmigrŽs recorded as requesting naturalization about 1694 or 1695 or 1696. She states that by 1696 the two Jacques DuguŽs had Òsailed here, settled here, been buried here, and no longer cared about this worldÕs laws.Ó She discusses the well-documented settlement of the Jacques DuguŽ I estate and its record of the disposition of his Charleston town lots as evidence of the children of Jacques DuguŽ Sr. She also indicates that Isaac and Peter were Òlater shipwrights in Jamaica.Ó No citation is provided for this information, but recent research in Jamaican parish registers has now established the outlines of the history of the family there as well.

The Documentary Evidence for the Dugue Family

Jacques (James) DuguŽ

DuguŽ appears in some records as Jacques and in some as the Anglicized version, James.

The family of Jacques DuguŽ appears in the records of lÕEglise de Threadneedle Street, London, where they presented their tŽmoignages, or certificates verifying that they were genuine Huguenots, with the names of the congregation or individual from whom the tŽmoignage came. The DuguŽ entries are as follows:[7]

á        Du Gue, Jean. T. Charenton, 4 Feb 1782

á        Jaques. T. Mr Amonnet, 5 Sep 1683

á        Jaques: sa fem.: Jaques, son fils, & Judith Soumin. T. Wansworth. 26 Nov 1684.

The Jean DuguŽ above is not known to have traveled to South Carolina, but Jacques and his son Jacques were in South Carolina by 1685. The Threadneedle St. record indicates that Judith Soumin was the mother of the oldest boy, Jacques, Jr. ÒSa femÓ at this time was presumably Elizabeth Dupuy DuguŽ.

It was recorded that Ò . . . On April 14, 1685, James Dugue bought 500 acres in London for £25.38 A day later Isaac Lejay and Magdalen Fleury (alias Lejay) his wife, bought 500 acres, at the same price.Ó[8] (By 1757 a portion of this property was sold by Thomas Rivers, Jr. of St. Andrews Parish to George Sheed, after passing through several conveyances since the original grant to Jacques DuguŽ.[9])

The Newtown Creek, James Island, property was to remain at least partially in DuguŽ family hands through at least 1733. Some of the Newtown Creek landowners are especially significant in Dugue/Duke history, are documented in this summary and in the file of ÒAssociated Families, Charleston.Ó Briefly, they include the Davis, Tucker, Ash, Maverick, and Hearn families. All of these families were closely associated with the DuguŽ and Duke families in the Charleston area and in Orangeburg.

On 15 Oct 1686 ____ Dugue swore allegiance to King James.[10] Others who swore allegiance on the same day were Jod. Oldys, William Popell, ____ Bacon, and Anthoin Poilivint.

In 1688 James DuguŽ purchased another 200 acres on Newtown Creek, James Island, to add to those acquired while he was in London:

Series Number: S213019 

Volume: 0038 

Page: 00209 

Item:01 

Date: 1688/01/05

Description: DRAYTON, THOMAS, TO JAMES DUQUE, CONVEYANCE FOR 200 ACRES ON TOWN CREEK.

Names Indexed: DUQUE, JAMES/DRAYTON, THOMAS/

Locations: TOWN CREEK/

Type: CONVEYANCE/

Regarding town lots, there are discrepancies between the South Carolina Department of Archives and History listings and SmithÕs review of early Charleston settlers.

Series: S213019 Volume - 0038 Page - 00254 Item - 01 

Date: 1694/03/13 

Description: DUQUE, JAMES SR., ABSTRACT OF LAND GRANT FOR 1 TOWN LOT IN CHARLES TOWN.

 

Series: S213019 Volume - 0038 Page - 00256 Item - 03 

Date: 1694/03/28 

Description: DUEQUE, JAMES SR., ABSTRACT OF LAND GRANT FOR 1 TOWN LOT IN CHARLES TOWN.

 

Series: S213019 Volume - 0038 Page - 00256 Item - 04 

Date: 1694/03/28 

Description: DUEQUE, JAMES SR., ABSTRACT OF LAND GRANT FOR 1 TOWN LOT IN CHARLES TOWN.

The town lots granted to the DuguŽ family according to SmithÕs article on the earliest settlers of Charleston were: [11]

No. 98                James Dugue  13 Mar 1693/4

No. 165                            Isaac Dugue    28 Mar 1694

No. 186                            I. Dugue           25 Mar 1694

Since both lots #165 and #186 were included in the settlement of the estate of Jacques DuguŽ I, it is clear that it is the SCDAH record that is correct with respect to the original grants. However, the list was made in 1725, and it is possible that lots 165 and 186 had been transferred to Isaac Dugue by that time, although both lots had been inherited by Peter Dugue in 1696.

James Dugue was also granted Charleston Lot #93 in Mar 1693/4, according to Hicks.[12] The SCHM Charleston lot list shows #92 and #93 on 14 Nov 1701 as the French Church (Charleston Deed AA:317).[13] The lots were given to Henry LeNoble and Peter Burtell, bounding west on King St., in 1701 for the use of the French Protestants. Hicks goes on to trace both lots as having been bequeathed in the will of Henry LeNoble in 1715 to his wife, who in turn bequeathed equally to her daughters Susannah Ravenel and Catherine LeNoble Taylor in 1725. The current French Church is located at 44 Church St., across from the Dock St. Theater.

Hicks also indicates that Lot #165 was granted to Jacques Dugue and Alexander T. Chastagner in 1694. It was inherited by Peter DuguŽ in 1696. Hicks indicates that #165 was bequeathed by Peter Buretell in his 1701 will.[14] This property was allotted to Nathaniel and Charlotte Henrietta Broughton through his estate. Adjacent lot #166 was bequeathed by Peter Burtell by will 1701 to Paul and Catherine Mazyck. Lot #167 belonged to Charlotte Henrietta Broughton as granddaughter of Peter Burtell in his 1701 will. It was sold by Thomas Broughton in 1747. Hicks may be confusing #165 with #93, which was granted for the benefit of the French church but became part of BurtellÕs estate.

There seem to have been several occasions on which oaths of allegiance were signed. Among those signing the oath of allegiance on 6 Oct 1685 were J. DuguŽ, P. Bacot, and Anthony Poitevin.[15] Chardon observes that some records give a date of 1686 for this. PotevinÕs daughters married the Snows, one of them marring John Snow whose will Thomas Goodman Duke witnessed.

On 20 Jan 1688 a DuguŽ, presumably Jacques, and four others swore allegiance to the English government and the Lords Proprietors and their colonial government.[16] Others listed on the same day include ÒJos. OldysÓ of Connecticut, whose daughter Margaret married Isaac Brunson, Sr., uncle of Jacob Brunson, who was the first husband of Barbara Fuster Brunson Lammons Dukes of Orangeburgh. ÒAnthoin PiolivintÓ also is listed. This is surely Anthony Poitevin.  There was also ___ Bacon and William Popell. The same series of oath-takers includes several additional Huguenots over a period of several years, but most of those listed taking this oath at this time are of English origin.

In 1692 a DuguŽ, possibly Jacques but possibly Samuel, was among those attempting to get political rights for the Huguenots:[17]

 The French, as far as we know, made no demonstrative fight for their rights before 1692-3 . . . In this their first significant effort to secure their rights they chose seven leading Huguenots to champion their cause and plead their case before the proprietors. They were the Rev. Francis Trouillard, Minister of the Charles Town Huguenot church, MM. Buretal, Serrurier and Couran, Elders in the same church and MM. DeVervant, DeLisle, Cramahâ and Duguâ prominent Huguenot business men and planters in and about Charles Town.

In 1694 James ÒDugayÓ (whether the older or younger isnÕt known) had 10 pipes of wine consigned to him on the Mary and Elizabeth, out of Madiera.[18] According to Wikipedia, a pipe of Madeira was 92 gallons or 348 liters, or about 2 hogsheads. (The unit varied by type of wine.) Clearly James DuguŽ was a wine merchant.

In 1703 William Carlisle, tanner, recorded the various sales of a 100 acre grant originally made to John Ellis and later owned by James Dugue, merchant. The property is described as follows:[19]

 ÒPart of a tract of 500 acres situate on S side Newtown Creek bounding N on said creek, S on land not laid out, E on land of Thomas Drayton, W on William Hatten which 100 acres was granted to John Ellis, planter, by Lords Proprs. As appears on grant dated 5 Oct. 1681, said land conveyed by Ellis to Peter and Mary Dumoulin, then conveyed to James Green and by said Green to Lydia Green his wife and by her sold to James Varin, by said Varin to Susan his wife and by her to Jacob Varin, his eldest son, by him to James Dugue, by Dugue to William Carlisle, all conveyances may appear by several deeds . . . Signed: Wm. Carlile, Wit: Joseph Elicott, Jno. Ward. D: 23 July 1703.

No record of the purchase by Jacques DuguŽ has been found.

By the end of 1696 both Jacques DuguŽ I and II were dead.

The provisions of the settlement of the estate of Jacques DuguŽ document his surviving family:[20]

October 27, 1696, Peter DuguŽ, son and sole executor of the last will and testament of James Dugue, Sr., deceased, Samuel DuBourdieu and Judith, his wife, James DuBose and Mary, his wife, and Marianna DuguŽ, widow and relict of James DuguŽ, Jr., on behalf of her daughter, Marianna DuguŽ, arranged a dvision of the property of James DuguŽ, Sr., reciting that the said James DuguŽ, Sr., by his will, made May 28, 1696, bequethed to his five children therein named and to his granddaughter, Marianna Dugue, all of his real and personal estate to be equally divided among them; that all of the said property that had come to the knowledge of said legatees had been divided into six parts, whereof Peter DuguŽ, in his own right and also as trustee in right of his brother, Isaac, and sister, Elizabeth; Samuel DuBourdien and James DuBose, in right of their wives, and Marianna DuguŽ, widow, in right of her daughter, Marianna DuguŽ, severally took their several parts of the same, Peter Dugue taking the plantation upon New Town Creek, JamesÕs Island, two town lots in Charles Town, numbered 165 and 186, a negro boy and £2.5.10 sterling; Peter taking for Isaac and Elizabeth part of a town lot in Charles Town, on Broad Street, which James DuguŽ purchased of James DeBourdeaux, blacksmith, together with the buildings thereon, and £4. 12. 4; James and Mary DuBose taking a negro man, a negro woman, a negro boy; James and Mary DuBose receiving the use of two lots in Charles Town, numbers 70 and 98, for two years and six months; then delivering possession of them up to Marianna DuguŽ for the use of her daughter, Marianna; Marianna DuguŽ taking for her daughter the use of lots in Charles Town for two years and six months, one of the lots being on Church Street, numbered 70, granted to Arthur Middleton, and having been purchased by James DuguŽ from Robert Skelton, cordwinder, the other granted to James DuguŽ, and numbered 98, the said lots to become the property, at the expiration of the time, of the younger Marianna DuguŽ; Samuel and Judith DuBordieu also to receive £54. 8 6 in goods of said estate. Witness: Antoine Couran, Isaac Callabeuf, Jonathon Amory and Anthony Cordes. Signature of Marianna DuguŽ witnessed by Boisseau, John Marriner and John Filbein. Proved before James Moore, November 9, 1696, and before James LeBas, January 22, 1696-7. Witness: Charles Odinsells, Dep. Sec. (Pages 286 and 247).

The Broad St. lot that was purchased from James DuBourdeaux was a subdivided part of Charleston Lot #28. The 500 acres in Berkeley County that was granted to James DuguŽ in 1692 does not appear here, but could have been transferred to one of the children before his death.

The following also details disposition of the estate[21]

Indenture: between Peter Dugue, son, sole exor. Of estate of James DuguŽ, Sr., dec., of 1st part and Samuel Du Bourdieu, Esq., and Judith his wife, James DuBose and Mary his wife and Marynna DuguŽ, widow and relict of James Dugue, Jr., on behalf of her dau. Marry Anna DuguŽ, on the other part. Whereas said James DuguŽ, Sr., the 28th of May 1696 made his will and did bequeath to his 5 children and his granddau. Mary Anna DuyGue, all his estate equally divided. And Whereas estate of said DuguŽ, Sr., has been valued at £403 18s 10 p by inventory as annexed, is divided into 7 parts where said Peter DuguŽ, on his right and as trustee in right of his brother Isaac and sister Elizabeth DuguŽ, Samuel Du Bourdieu and James DuBose in right of their wives and Maryanna DuguŽ, widow in right of her dau. Mary Anna DuguŽ, do acknowledge receipts and possession of signing these presents. Now this indenture witnesseth that Peter DuguŽ that the plantation lands and houses which belonged to his father on New Town Creek, James Island, 2 lots in Charles Town #165 and #186, 1 Negro boy, and for the use of his brother Isaac and sister Elizabeth DuguŽ purchased of James De Bourdeaux, blacksmith, with houses and buildings and £4 12s 4 p for their part of estate, and James and Mary DuBose shall keep 1 Negro man and woman, 1 boy valued at £70 and 2 town lots in Charles Town #70 and #98 for term of 2 years and 7 mos., and keeping houses and fences in good repair, and at expiration of said time deliver to Maryanna DuguŽ, widow, possession . . . p. 270

James Dugue II

James Dugue Jr. emigrated with his family and married Marianne Fleury de la Plaine, daughter of Abraham Fleury de la Plaine of Goose Creek. She was born in Paris. JamesÕ estate settlement papers document his death before that of his father.

The listing of Abraham Fleury de la Plaine from the St. Julien List:

7. ABRAHAM FLEURY, De la Pleine, nŽ ˆ Tours, fils de Charles Fleury, et de Madeleine Soupzmain.  Marianne Fleury, sa fille, veuve de Jacques DuguŽ, nŽe  ˆ Paris, et Marianne DuguŽ, fille du dŽfunct Jacques DuguŽ, et du dit Marianne Fleury, nŽe en Caroline. 

This family immigrated with the Petit-GuŽrard Colony.[22] (The FaurŽ or Fouri family was also among the settlers in this group, and is later associated with the Duke family of Orangeburg County, SC.)

Iin 1692 James DuguŽ acquired land 500 acres of land at an unspecified location in Berkeley County:

Series: S213019 Volume - 0038 Page - 00227 Item - 04 

Date: 1692/03/31 

Description: DUQUE, JAMES, LAND GRANT FOR 500 ACRES IN BERKLEY COUNTY.

This land may have been on James Island, which was in Berkeley County at this time. If the grant actually was made to James DuguŽ, Jr. rather than to his father, Goose Creek would have been especially likely, since it has been suggested that he lived there after his marriage to Marianne Fleury, and after his death his widow remarried to Peter Bacot of that community. [23]

In settling JamesÕ estate, John Lebert [Lebas] of Charles Towne, merchant, moved to be granted Letters of Admin. Of estate of James Dugue as principal creditor; Mrs. Dugay and James Dugue agreed 17 Jan 1696/7.[24]

Records show the following regarding the estate of James Dugue:[25]

January 18, 1695-6, John Lebas, Henry Le Noble and Peter Guerard executed their bond to Governor Archdale for LebasÕs faithful performance of his trust as administrator of the estate of James Dugue, late of Charles Town, deceased. Witness: Charles Odingsells (Page 231).

Virginia Gourdin has suggested that Lebas (Lebert or LeBas) might have been a business partner of Jacques DuguŽ.[26] This is probably true. Aside from his role as administrator of the estate of Jacques DuguŽ, he witnessed legal documents while in Jamaica relating to the estate of Susanna Barker, suggesting that he too was involved in Jamaican trade.[27] (When lands opened up in Amelia Township in the 1730Õs, James Le Bas was among those acquiring grants, in close proximity to Peter FaurŽ, Joseph Barker, and others from Charleston and the surrounding area.)

Settlement of the estate of James DuguŽ Jr. involved dealing with the estate of James DuguŽ, Sr.:[28]

Judgment: that the said Mary Anna Du Gue, widow, for use of her sister [daughter] Mary Anna Du Gue by her husband James Du Gue, Jr., to keep in her possession the expiration of 2 years 7 mos. From date here of 2 town lots in Charles Towne in st. that leads from French Church to White Point, one of which #70 was purchased by James DuguŽ, Sr., from Robert Skelton, cordwainer, the other lot was granted to said Du Gue and known by #98, which 2 lots with buildings thereon belonging to Mary Anna DuguŽ, dau. Of said James Du Gue, Jr., is to hold her share of real estate, and her mother Mary Ann Du Gue, widow, paying to Samuel Du Bourdien £5 2s 10 p stg., and that the said Samuel and Judith Du Bourdien shall receive of said Du Bose £5 3s 10p stg., . . . . Estate of James Du Gue, Sr., as in aforementioned will, in witness whereof the parties have set their hands and seals. Signed, Jacques Dubose, Marie Dubose, S. Dubourdien, Judith Dubourdien, Mariane Dugue. Wit: Anthoine Louran, Isaac Caillabeuf, Johnathan Amory, Anthony Cordes. D: nd.

Memorandum: Mad. Mariane Dugue, widow, sealed and delivered the above indenture in presence of: - J. Boissean, John Maverick, John ffilbein.

Personally: appeared before me John Boissian, Mr. John Maverick and John Filbein and made oath they did see Mrs. Marianne Dugue sign. Wit: Jos. Moore. D: 9 Nov. 1696.

Personally: appeared before me James Lebass, one of his MajestyÕs Justices of Peace for Berkeley County, Anthony Bouran, Anthony Cordes and Isaac Cailabeuf and made oath that they did see Mrs. Judith Dubourdien, Mr. Samuel Dubourdien, James Dubose and Marie Dubose sign within act in Charles Towne. Wit: James Le Bars. D: 23 Nov.  1696. R: 22 Mar 1696/7. P. 231.

The witnesses above suggest where Marianne Dugue was when she signed the document. John Maverick, one of the witnesses of Mrs. DugueÕs signature, was one of the first settlers on Newtown Creek (site of Jacques DuguŽ's first grant). However, John Maverick also owned land at Goose Creek, below the confluence of the Cooper and the Back River, near Nathaniel SnowÕs Red Bank plantation.[29] (The Mavericks later reappear in the will of Joan Watkins Duke of Christ Church Parish, widow of William Duke.) In 1696 J. Boisseau owned property at the head of Yeamans Creek adjacent Abraham Fleury de la Plane, and had not yet received his much larger grant near Summerville.[30] John Filbein owned a tract south of Yeamans Hall.[31]

After his death the widow of James Dugue II remarried, to Peter Bacot, Jr. The listing for the Bacot family in the St. Julien List is as follows:

22. PIERRE BACOT, nŽ ˆ Tours, fils de Pierre Bacot et de Jeanne Moreau.  Jacquine Mercier, sa femme.  Pierre et Daniel Bacot, frres, leurs fils, nŽz en France, et ƒlizabeth Bacot, leur fille, nŽe en Caroline. 

Bacot lived in the St. James Goose Creek Parish, as did Abraham Fleury de la Plaine, father of Marianne DuguŽ. His earliest acquisition there was part of the original Boisseau tract and he also purchased land from Charles Franchomme.[32]

The will of Peter Bacot of Berekeley County, SC, in the next generation (b. 15 Nov 1671 d. 1730, Charleston), mentions his wife Mary [Perroneau] Bacot, sons Samuel and Peter, daughters Mary and Elizabeth, friend Tobias Fitch, sister-in-law Elizabeth Peronneau. He named Gideon Faucharode and Tobias Fitch executors and wife Mary Bacot executrix Òduring her widowhood and no longer.Ó[33] Tobias Fitch married Marianne, daughter of James Dugue II and Marianne Fleury de la Plane Dugue.

Marianne DuguŽ, daughter of James DuguŽ, Jr., and Tobias Fitch

Marianne DuguŽ married Tobias Fitch (originally Fitz), who was from one of the early Quaker families that settled in the lowcountry, particularly in lower Colleton County. He was a son of Jonathan and Susanna Fitch, and was a member of the Assembly in 1726. Jonathan Fitch lived at Goose Creek but had very substantial land grants at Spoons Savannah,[34] This was also the location of substantial Pendarvis family land holdings; the Pendarvis family was later in Orangeburgh District.

Jonathan Fitch was involved in Indian affairs.[35] Jonathan Fitch and Thomas Rose of Accabee built the St. Andrews Parish church.[36] Tobias Fitch lived, owned his most extensive properties (at least some if which were inherited by his wife Marianne DuguŽ from her grandfather Abraham Fleury de la Plaine) in St. James, Goose Creek, where he was listed as petit and grand juror.[37]

The Colonial Writs of Partition document that James Fitch married Ann Rose, daughter of that Thomas Rose, and also show that the Fitch family owned land on the Ashley River adjacent lands owned by the Pendarvis family, as they did at Spoons.[38]

In 1718/19 Tobias Fitch provided bond for the estate of Daniel Dean, along with estate administrator Nathaniel Snow, brother of John Snow whose will Thomas Goodman Duke of St. Thomas and St. Denis witnessed thirty years later.[39]  James Dubose, husband of Marie Dugue, is also mentioned in an estate settlement with Nathaniel Snow.[40]

In July 1720 ÒTobias Fitch, planter, & Marianne, his wife, daughter of James Dugue, Jr.. & of Dame Marian Henry his wife & granddaughter of James Dugue, Sr.Ó sold to Andrew Dupuy of Charleston the southern half of Lot #70 in Charleston.[41]

This Andrew Dupuy may be related to the DuguŽs, through Elizabeth Dupuy DuguŽ. The will of AndrŽ Dupuy, dated 4 Jan 1721/2 and probated 11 Oct 1722, listed wife Jane as executrix. Also listed were a son, AndrŽ, and daughters Marianne and Esther. Witnesses were Pierre Manigault and Jean Delaune.[42] This son, AndrŽ, is probably the Andrew Dupuy to whom half of lot #70 was sold.

In 1721 Tobias Fitch had a town lot adjacent Peter Manigault, Richard Beresford (previously Jackson) and others.[43]

In 1722 Jonathan and Tobias Fitch were involved in several land transactions that were witnessed by Garratt Vanvelsin.[44] GuŽrard or Garrett Vanvelsin was a witness for the wedding of Robert Duke a little more than a decade later (see Assoc. Families, Charleston, file). In 1723 John Laurens witnessed a Tobias Fitch land transaction.[45]

In 1725 Tobias Fitch was Agent to the Creeks.[46]

The will of Susannah Fitch, widow of Jonathan Fitch, enumerates her grandchildren as Jonathan, Thomas and Steven, sons of Jonathan Fitch; Steven, Tobias, and John, sons of Tobias Fitch; Williamson, son of Joseph Fitch. Granddaughters were Susannah, daughter of Joseph Fitch; Mary and Ann, daughters of Tobias Fitch. Her daughters-in-law were Mary Ann Fitch and Constant Fitch. The executor of her estate was Roger Sanders [Saunders]. Witnesses were Thomas Smith Jr. and George Smith.[47]

Roger Saunders owned land at Wassamassaw but was an Indian trader rather than a planter. His bond was dated 24 Nov 1714. He was also executor for Thomas Smith, Jr.[48]

Mary Fitch, daughter of Tobias and Marianne Fitch, married Thomas Livingston in 1747.[49]

The Giessendanner Book of Record for the parish centered in Orangeburgh shows that John Fitch married Ann Holmes 16 Jan 1748/49 in Orangeburgh County. William Clement and Samuel Pickings were listed as witnesses (the best translation is found in the Orangeburgh Book of Record at http://www.xs4all.nl/~sail/orange/17490116.html). SCDAH records show that a Clement family was from St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish. The Mills Atlas of South Carolina of 1825 shows Clement family holdings near Willtown on the Edisto, and therefore near the Fitch family lands at Spoons and near the Ash family lands.

One candidate for Ann Holmes is a daughter of Isaac Holmes who was mentioned in the will of her uncle William Holmes.[50] Isaac Holmes owned land adjacent John Simmons, whose granddaughter Ann married James Vanvelsen.[51]Francis Holmes was a Charleston merchant, and with Ebenezer Simmons was executor of the will of Garret Vanvelsen.[52] William Holmes was the son-in-law of Garret Vanvelsen. However, it is more likely that the Holmes family in the New Windsor area was her origin; that family also intermarried with the Zubly and Galphin families.

Tobias Fitch was an active businessman:

Series Number: S372001 

Volume: 00A0 

Page: 00005 

Item:00 

Date: 1719-1721

Description: FITCH, TOBIAS TO WILLIAM LIVINGSTON, MORTGAGE OF 12 NEGROES AS FURTHUR SECURITY OF A BOND FOR 47,000 WEIGHT RICE.

Names  Indexed: FITCH, TOBIAS/LIVINGSTON, WILLIAM/

Locations: /

Type: MORTGAGE/

Topics: SLAVE MORTGAGES/RICE

In 1732 Tobias Fitch was involved in a land transaction for the benefit of the Peter Bacot family. FitchÕs mother-in-law Marianne DuguŽ married Peter Bacot after the death of James Dugue II, and the individuals listed are children of Bacot and Marie Peronneau, whom he married in 1716.

Series Number: S213184 

Volume: 0002 

Page: 00278 

Item: 01 

Date: 1732/03/02

Description: FITCH, CAPT. TOBIAS, PLAT FOR 541 ACRES OF LAND IN BERKLEY COUNTY FOR THE USE OF SAMUEL BACOT, PETER BACOT, MARY BACOT AND ELIZABETH BACOT.

Names  Indexed: FITCH, TOBIAS/GIBS/BACOT, SAMUEL/BACOT, PETER/BACOT, MARY/BACOT, ELIZABETH/BACOT, PETER SR./ST. JOHN, JAMES/STEVENS, JOHN/

Locations: BERKELEY COUNTY/

Type: PLAT/

Tobias Fitch had a substantial grant on the Four Holes.

Series Number: S213184 

Volume: 0002 

Page: 00258 

Item: 00 

Date: 1732/06/11

Description: FITCH, CAPT. TOBIAS, PLAT FOR 1,783 ACRES OF LAND IN BERKLEY COUNTY.

Names  Indexed: FITCH, TOBIAS/ST. JOHN, JAMES/BAYLEY, JOHN/

Locations: BERKELEY COUNTY/CYPRESS SWAMP/FOUR HOLE CREEK

Type: PLAT/

It is further documented that in 1738 Tobias Fitch owned land on Four Hole Swamp, Colleton County, near Capt. Goodbee and Gideon Dupont.[53] (Alexander Goodbe married Rebecca Hasfort, daughter of Joseph Hasfort.[54])

Tobias Fitch was associated with the Tucker family, which was later at Cattle Creek in Orangeburgh District with the family of Joseph Dukes. John Tucker witnessed a land transaction between Jonathan and Tobias Fitch in 1715:[55]

I, Jonathan Fitch of Berkeley County, Carolina, planter, agree to and with Tobias Fitch; I, Jonathan Fitch, for £2,000 c.m. paid to me by Tobias Fitch of said county do sell to Tobias Fitch that tract or tracts of land where my father Jonathan Fitch, last lived being on N side Ashley River as shown on plats to which is annexed the Lords. Proprs. grant; Furthermore I do agree to Tobias Fitch and his heirs shall peaceably occupy and enjoy said premises without any manner of molestation by me or any of my heirs, the quit rent reserved and payable to Lords Proprs . . . . Signed Jonathan Fitch. Wit: John Tocker, Elias Clifford. D: 2 Aprl. 1715.

Memorandum: peaceable possession of the within granted premises was taken by Jonthan Fitch, grantor, and like possession was delivered to Tobias Fitch according to law. Wit: [same]. D: 2 Apr. 1715.

Memorandum: came before me Elizas Clifford who swore that he did see Jonathan Fitch sign within Bill of Sale to within mentioned Tobias Fitch, and also John Toker did witness same. Signed: Robt. Daniell. D: 28 Apr 1716. R: 1 May 1716. P. 303.

Tobias Fitch is listed in the South Carolina jury lists as a petit juror in St. PaulÕs Parish in 1720 and as a grand and petit juror in St. James Goose Creek in 1731.

Judith Dugue and Samuel DuBourdieu

Articles of marriage for Judith DuguŽ, daughter of Jacques DuguŽ, and Samuel Dubourdie, are as follows:[56]

Jacques Du Gue, merchant; late wife Judith Soumin; dau. Judith; dauÕs intended spouse Samuel Dubourdie, Esq.: Articles of Marriage: between Judith du Gue and Samuel Dubourdie; inventory will be made after said du GueÕs death, and Samuel Dubourdie will receive such share as he pleases; for estate left at Vishe in Britanny, Province of France that Dubourdie gives Judith Du Gue 1/3 part; Dubourdie received £15 from his former wife for benefit of his child; all inheritance by said Judith to go to children of intended marriage, all left her in American and in France. Signed: J. Dugue, Samuel Dubourdieu, Judith Dugue. Wit: ____  Dubos, ____ Du bose, ___eth Du Gue, Jean de Ffarcy, Suzanne Margeuritte De Farcy, Anthoine Bourau, P. la ssalle. D: 10 Sept 1690.

The DuBourdieu family listing in the St. Julien List is as follows:

57. SAMUEL DU BOURDIEU, Escuyer, nŽ ˆ VitrŽ en Bretagne fils d'Olivier Du Bourdieu et de Marie Genne.  Judith DuguŽ, sa femme.  Louis Philipe Du Bourdieu, fils du dit Samuel Du Bourdieu et de Louise Thoury, nŽ en Caroline.  Samuel Du Bourdieu, fils du susdit et de la ditte Judith DuguŽ, nŽ en Caroline.

Judith, daughter of the DuBourdieus, married James Colleton.[57]

Part of the original Newtown Creek, James Island, SC, grant to Jacques Du GuŽ was sold by Du GuŽ to Samuel Dubourdieu in 1693 and subsequently sold by Dubourdieu to Richard Peterson in 1703:[58]

I, Samuel DuBourdieu, Esq., of Carolina, in consideration of £55 stg. c.m. paid to me by Capt. Richard Peterson, Sr., the receipt I do acknowledge, have sold 200 acres of land granted to James Du Gu«, Sr., by Lords Proprs., being part of 500 acres granted to said Du Gue, Sr., and by him sold to Samuel Du Bourdieu as appears on Deed of Sale dated 5 Jan 1693 . . . . said Peterson, Sr., paying quit rents hereafter as they shall come due and shall peaceably occupy said land . . . Signed; Saml. Du Bourdieu. Wit: Benj. Clee, Jams. Duose, Jno. Thomas, D: 20 Aug. 1703.

I, Samuel Du Bourdieu, Esq., acknowledge myself to owe Capt. Richad Peterson full sum of £10 stg. c.m. of province. D: 20 Aug 1703. Condition of Obligation: Samuell Du Bourdieu, Esq., has sold to Capt. Richad Peterson above mentioned plantation of 200 acres of land with houses as appears on Deed of êale. Signed Samll. DuBourdieu. Wit: Benj. Clee, James Dubose, John Thomas.

Memorandum: Livery and Seizen was given to Samuel Du Bourdieu, Esq., within mentioned to Capt. Richad Peterson, Sr., 200 acres of land specified ÒTurfe and TwiggÓ according to custom. Signed: Samll. DuBourdieu. Wit: Jno. Ward, Wm. Carlile. D: 21 Aug 1703.

Memorandum: came before me John Thomas, James Dubose and John Ward and swore theyd di see above named Samuel Du Bourdieu sign within Bill of Sale to said Richard Peterson and John Ward did witness same. Signed: Geo. Logan. D: 7 Jan 1703 [4].  R: 12 Feb. 1703/4. P. 426.

In 1710 Judith DuBourdieu acquired a grant of 240 acres in her own name in Berkeley County.[59] In 1735 Judith ÒDeaberduÓ had a plat surveyed for 600 acres of land in St. HelenaÕs Parish, Granville County.[60] This was granted on 14 April 1736.[61] This property was in the hands of John Wragg in 1762.[62]

The DuBourdieu family continued their concern for marriage contracts in the next generation:[63]

Book Ba, p. 29 29 July 1720. Judith Dubourdieu, widow, of Berkeley Co., SC, in consideration of marriage contract between James Colleton and her daughtere Judith Dubourdieu granted 1/3 part of land in her possession to James Colleton Òand also the third part of the Negroes wch is already sheared and as soon as the howing time is over the same James Colleton shall be put in possession both of the land and Negroes by the provisoe; tha the hand of the said James Colleton shall help to put in the crop that is now upon the ground and also to clean the rice fit for market; because the said rice is designed to pay the debts of the plantation or in part of which the said Colleton is to pay the third part as well as to have the third of the said cropt debts paid; and I Samuel DuBourdieu do agree and consent conjointly with my mother to this above gift and agreement.Ó Witnesses: Major Percivel Pawley, Paul Peter Lebas. Before Benjamin Whitaker, Robert Yonge, Register, 19 Sept. 1720 6 Negroes delivered to James Colleton and Judith (daughter) as part of daughterÕs fortune. Witnesses: Henry Simmons, Paul Trapier.

 

Marie Dugue Dubose and James Dubose

Marie Dugue married James Dubose. He was the son of Andrea Dubose and Marie de Stoade.[64] This is the St. Julien List summary of some of the immigrants from this family:

72. ISAAC DUBOSC, fils de Louis Dubosc et d'Anne Dubosc, de Dieppe en Normandie, Susane Dubosc, sa femme, fille de Pierre Couillandeau, et de Susane Couillandeau, native de la Tramblade en Xaintonge.

By 1706 James Dubose was dead, and Dr. John Thomas (Jean Thomas), a ÒchirugeonÓ became her second husband.[65] (John Thomas was a witness to the will of Joseph Pendarvis I.[66])

A daughter of James Dubose and Marie Dugue, Judith, married Joseph Wragg, to whom Peter Dugue gave power-of-attorney to collect debts in South Carolina in 1718.

The Wraggs and Job Rothmahler had a legal dispute with Jonathan Fitch regarding collection of a debt:

Series Number: S136002 

Box: 013A 

Item: 0109A 

ignore: 00 

Date: 1719

Description: WRAGG, SAMUELL, JOSEPH WRAGG AND JOB ROTHMAHLER VS JONATHAN FITCH, JUDGMENT ROLL.

Names  Indexed: WRAGG, SAMUELL//WRAGG, JOSEPH//ROTHMAHLER, JOB/FITCH, JONATHAN/

Type: JUDGMENT-ROLL//

James Dubose was owed money by Robert Wetherick of New England at the time of WetherickÕs death in the house of surgeon Nathaniel Snow in September 1700.[67] Nathaniel Snow was the brother of John Snow, whose will later was witnessed by Thomas Goodman Duke of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish.  Both John and Nathaniel Snow married Poitevans, thus linking themselves to the Huguenot community, specifically to parts of it with connections to the Dugue family. On 20 Dec 1699 Anthony Poitvin, Lewis Pasquereau and James DuBose were bound for the estate of James De Bourdeaux, administered by Anthony Poitvin.[68]

Joseph Wragg is also mentioned as an adjacent landowner in a 1733 land title that refers to Peter Dugue (see below in the discussion of Peter DuguŽ). Wragg acquired many land grants throughout South Carolina, which are documented in the records of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

In 1741 Joseph Wragg and Richard Lambton sued John Hearn.[69] The cause appears to be a routine debt. Hearn was from James Island, and was the earliest settler at Orangeburg Township, arriving several years before establishment of the township as a Swiss settlement.

The children and grandchildren of this couple were:[70]

1. Marie (Mary), born in Carolina, and married Hon. Samuel Wragg. Their children

were:

A. William Wragg (m. 1st. Mary Wood; m. 2nd. Henrietta).

   B. Samuel Wragg.

   C. Judith Wragg.

   D. Mary Wragg.

 

2. Judith Dubose, m. 1717 Joseph Wragg. They lived in Charles Town, where he was

a merchant. Her Will is recorded in Will Bk. 1767-71, p. 388, Charleston, S. C.,

and mentions her children who were:

 A. John Wragg.

  B. Joseph Wragg.

  C. Samuel Wragg, married Judith Rothmahler.

  D. Judith Wragg, died 1783 unmarried.

  E. Ann Wragg, maried Hon. Christopher Gadsden.

  F. Mary Wragg, married Benjamin Smith.

  G. Charlotte Wragg, married John Poaug (Poague).

  H. Elizabeth Wragg, married Peter Manigault.

  I. Henrietta Wragg, married William Wragg who died 1780.

 

See Will of Joseph Wragg who died 1751 in Will Bk. 1747-52, p. 443 Charleston,

S. C. Note Will of Judith Wragg, daughter of Joseph and Judith Wragg, Bk.

1783-86, p. 79. In this will she mentions sisters and a brother and Wragg

nephews along with nephews John Poague, Gabrill Manigault, and Joseph Smith, and

also nieces Ann Ferguson, Judith Ladson, Mary Smith, Anne Manigault, Henrietta

Manigault, along with Wragg Nieces, and makes her brother John Wragg, nephews

Joseph Wragg and Gabrill Manigault and Major James Ladson as Executors of her

Will.

 

3. Ann Dubose, married Job Rothmahler, Esq. They lived in the Georgetown area.

Children were:

A. Job Rothmahler, married Esther Billing.

B. Erasmus Rothmahler.

C. Mary Rothmahler, married John Andrews.

D. Judith Rothmahler, married Samuel Wragg.

E. Elizabeth Rothmahler, married John Waties.

F. Ann Rothmahler, died in Georgetown 1770, not married.

G. Charlotte Rothmahler, M. Joseph Allston of Waccamaw.

Job Rothmahler had many business interests with the Wraggs, some affecting the backcountry. In 1743 the South Carolina Commons House of Assembly investigated reports of a silver mine in Cherokee country, with the potential to disrupt the colonyÕs relations with the tribes and with the French.[71] Thomas Murray testified that he had traveled throughout the area in question with Mr. Rothmahler in search of mines. It was determined that Childermas Croft was among the several parties involved in the enterprise. Michael Christopher Rowe of Orangeburg testified that a public advertisement had been posted in the township to solicit workers for the mine, and that Òto the best of his recollection Mr. Wragg was to pay the money.Ó Those responding were to meet Mr. Maxwell at Mrs. RussellÕs house.  (The Audley Maxwell family had come from the PA/VA border with Moses Russell and his family to settle in Amelia Township.) Rowe testified that Bernard Snell was one of those involved in the work, and that Peter Crim was overseer of the mine. The Council was unanimous in condemning the enterprise as likely to enrich the individual participants at great danger to the colony. The Wraggs and Rothmahler were also large-scale slave traders. Many of CharlestonÕs historic mansions were built on foundations like these.

Peter DuguŽ

Peter DuguŽ, son of Jacques DuguŽ and his first wife Judith Soumin, was documented in the St. Julien List of Huguenots seeking naturalization in South Carolina in about 1696:

15. PIERRE DUGUƒ, Isaac Dugue, son frre, et ƒlizabeth DuguŽ, leur sŸur, nŽz ˆ BŽsance en Bery, enfans de Jacques DuguŽ et d'ƒlizabet Dupuy. 

Peter Dugue was the second oldest son of Jacques DuguŽ, an adult in 1696 and administrator of his fatherÕs estate following the death of his older brother, James.[72] Since he was an adult in 1696, he was born no later than 1675. PeterÕs share of his fatherÕs estate was the plantation (Jacques DuguŽsÕ original 500 acre grant) on New Town Creek, JamesÕs Island, SC; two town lots in Charles Town, SC, numbered 165 and 186; a negro boy and £2.5.10 sterling.

Peter quickly moved to increase his land holdings in South Carolina. He had a warrant from the SecretaryÕs office for 500 acres in Berkeley County, dated 18 Sep 1697.[73]

ÒMr. DuqueÓ is found in the following record; related documents place the time as about 1695:[74]

Particulars: of goods and sums of money Mr. Girard has assigned to Mr. Edmund Medlicott for stock of £400 put in hands of said Girard to trade and merchandise within partnership. Mr. Edmond Dundon, Mrs. Dundon his wife, Mr. William Nowell, Mr. Noble, Mr. Duque and others, 1/8 part brigantine that Mr. Turquett and Mr. Marian are building. Mr. Medlicott, Mr. John Reeves, Capt. James Moore, Mr. Hatchman, Mr. Froman [Amounting to £400 7s 1 ½.]

This evidence of DuguŽ involvement in CharlestonÕs lively shipping trade dates marks the beginning of a multi-generational involvement in shipping. The individual listed is probably Peter Dugue, although he could be Jacques DuguŽ I immediately before his death. Isaac DuguŽ was a minor in 1696 and could not have been a member of this group of ship owners.

Peter moved to Jamaica sometime during or before 1706. References to his family there are found primarily in the register of St. AndrewÕs Parish, Jamaica, which includes the town and port of Kingston.[75]

Volume I, Register of St. AndrewsÕs Parish, Jamaica:

p. 272            burial of Walter ÒDugouÓ 4 Nov 1706

p. 195            marriage of Peter Dugue and Dorothy Struyse, 23 Sep 1707

p. 47              baptism of Judith, daughter of Peter and Dorothy Dugue, 25 Aug 1708

p. 48              baptism of Peter, son of Peter and Dorothy Dugue, 2 Apr 1710

p. 50              baptism of Isaac, son of Peter and Dorothy Dugue, 6 Apr 1713

p. 51              baptism of Dorothy, daughter of Peter and Dorothy Dugue, Feb 1715

p. 53              baptism of James, son of Peter and Dorothy Dugue, 15 Mar 1720

p. 279            burial of Judith Dugue, 16 Dec 1720

p. 296            burial of Dorothy Dugue, spinster 23 Nov 1760

 

The name Struyse is rare, but it is probably not a mistake. It is a Dutch name, spelled in the Netherlands Struys, Struijs, and Struyse. Some of this family were famous mariners. Van Meurs of Amsterdam published a German translation of Jan Janszoon StruysÕ voyages in 1678.[76] Jan Struys was a middle-aged husband and father when he left to serve the Czar in the late 1660s.[77]  His book was later published in English,[78] and is often cited, sometimes for peculiar descriptions of natural phenomena. He also produced an especially good map of the Caspian Sea. There are also references to Òvan der Struijs.Ó

The parish register documents children Judith, Peter, Isaac, Dorothy, and James. The will of James Dugue, son of Peter and Dorothy, documents another daughter of Peter Dugue, Mary, who married Andrew Burnside of Jamaica. There are therefore at least six children of Peter DuguŽ.

Walter ÒDugouÓ (listed as Dugue in the register index) who died in St. Andrews in 1706 was possibly a child of Peter DuguŽ. This suggests that Peter had married and had children before his marriage to Dorothy Struyse in St. AndrewÕs Parish, Jamaica, in 1706. To have been an adult at the time that his father Jacques DuguŽÕs estate was settled in 1696, Peter was at least 31 years old in 1706, and could easily have married earlier and had children with a first wife; it is likely that he did so. His brother Isaac Dugue, on the other hand, was a minor in 1696, a bit older than his sister born in about 1685, and was probably no more than about 22-25 years old in 1706, young to have an existing family. On the other hand, all of the names that one would expect in a son of PeterÕs (Peter, Isaac, James) are found in the sons of the Struyse marriage; the origin of ÒWalterÓ in this family is entirely unknown.

The following references from the Kingston Parish, Jamaica, Register[79] document the death of three DuguŽ sons:

Vol. I:

p. 3 Dugay, James, buried 3 Nov 1722

p. 7 Dugue, Thomas, buried 1 Jan 1723

p. 8 Dugue, William, buried 22 Jan 1723

Peter and his brother Isaac were both in Jamaica at this time and in theory either could have been father of these children. However, it will be seen that James DuguŽ who died in Jamaica in 1766 was the son of Peter and Dorothy DuguŽ; the James DuguŽ who died in 1722 was probably a son of Isaac DuguŽ. This rapid succession of deaths may be attributable to the hurricane of 28 Aug 1722, one of the worst ever to hit Jamaica, with terrible loss of both life and property, and the earthquake the same year, which caused additional damage. Such events are often followed by the rapid spread of infectious disease, malnutrition, and other threats to human life, especially that of children. There was also a slave rebellion in Jamaica in 1722. It was not a healthy environment.

The listing of the burials in the Kingston Parish (the narrow slip of land extending partially across the harbor at Kingston, defined as a separate parish in 1693), which was not the usual family parish, suggests that the family may have lost their home as a consequence of the storm. As shipbuilders, it is also very likely that Peter and Isaac lost everything in their businesses, unless they had a ship at sea out of harmÕs way at the time of the storm.

Peter continued business interests in South Carolina long after he established his family in Jamaica. In 1718 Peter provided his power of attorney to Joseph Wragg of South Carolina to recover debts owed to him in South Carolina:

Series Number: S72001 

Volume: 00A0 

Page: 00109 

Item: 00 

Date: 1719-1721

Description: DUGUE, PETER TO JOSEPH WRAGG, POWER OF ATTORNEY TO RECOVER DEBTS IN SOUTH CAROLINA.

Names Indexed: DUGUE, PETER/WRAGG, JOSEPH/

Type: POWER OF ATTORNEY/

Topics: DEBT/

This power of attorney was witnessed in Jamaica by John Marten and Capt. Michal Durouzeaux.[80] The Martens who were in Jamaica at this time were Jewish residents of Spanish Town, Jamaica.[81] However Michael Durouzeaux appears to be a South Carolina connection of DuguŽÕs, a fellow Huguenot in the maritime trades. The members of the Durouzeaux family originally from Saintonge, France.[82] In 1699 ÒM DuroutzeÓ witnessed a document for John Royer of Charles Town, mariner. Royer was the son of Judith Royer, who after the death of Noah Royer married Peter Manigault. [83]

Bond for the administration of the estate of Daniell Durouzeaux, Sr., family founder in South Carolina, was provided in 1700 by Jean Prioleau, Peter Girard, and James Dubose (whose wife was Marie DuguŽ).  The warrant of appraisement for his estate was directed to Peter de St. Julien, James Le Lerurier, Lewis Pasquereau, Elias Foissin, and Henry Perroneau.[84]

Michael Durazeau provided bond, with Henry Broneau, for Henry Bruneau as administrator of the estate of Paul Brunean in 1711.[85] The Bruneaus were of a noble French family.[86] Bruneau owned land in St. James Santee Parish. In 1733 Henry Bruneau owned land on the Santee adjacent Jacob Bond, founder of the Bond shipyards at Hobcaw Point and father-in-law of Clement Lempriere and others.[87]

MichaelÕs brother, Daniel Durouzeaux, Jr., and Elizabeth Faucheraud married and were parents of Daniel Durouzeaux, III and Peter Durouzeaux. With the death of Daniel and Elizabeth, ElizabethÕs mother Anna Faucheraud (widow of Charles Faucheraud) was given custody of the minor children.[88] Daniel Durouzeaux III was married by Rev. John Giessendanner to Olivia Wood in 1747:[89]

93. Daniel Decuraseux March 14th To Olivet Wood.

In Georgia the Durouzeaux became very involved in Creek affairs, and intermarried with the Creeks. Stephen James Durouzeaux became the principal interpreter for the Creek Nation.[90] Tobias Fitch, who married Peter DuguŽÕs niece Marianne DuguŽ, was Creek agent in the mid-1720s.[91] Later their son John Fitch was active in Creek affairs, and settled in the Augusta area. John Fitch married Ann Holmes, whose family also intermarried with that of George Galphin (see Fitch and Holmes, Assoc. Families Charleston file). The will of Daniel Durouzeaux of Georgia listed George Galphin as an executor.[92] Galphin was the principal trader to the Lower Creek Nation, and Creek agent for Georgia governor Sir James Wright.[93]

Among the business interests that Peter DuguŽ may have retained in South Carolina, requiring appointment of his kinsman Joseph Wragg as attorney to represent him, was the property that he inherited from his father in Charleston and on James Island. On 27 and 28 Feb 1726 a deed by Richard Grimston for lot #229 in Charleston lists N on Mr. Dugue, E on John Hill, W on Thomas Rose.[94] This suggests that in 1726 Peter Dugue retained ownership of Lot #186, on King Street between Broad and Tradd, which he had inherited from his father in 1696. However, delays in filing deeds often produced out-of-date lists of adjacent landowners.

A memorial for Lawrence Dennis dated 1733 for property on the south side of Newtown Creek on James Island in South Carolina identifies Peter Dugue as an adjacent landowner on the east side in that year. The original document has been examined by the author and a staff archivist at the South Carolina Department of Archives` and History and seems to refer to him as a contemporary, not a past, landowner. This was land that Peter inherited from his father in 1696, near the Hearn, Davis, Tucker and Watkins families.[95]

Series Number: S111001 

Volume:  0003 

Page:  00248               

Item: 01 

Date: 1733/05/08

Description: DENNIS, LAWRENCE, MEMORIAL FOR TWO TRACTS CONTAINING 633 ACRES ON JAMES ISLAND, BERKLEY COUNTY.

Names Indexed: DENNIS, LAWRENCE/CLARK, HANNAH/CLARK/GEORGE, ROBERT/WILLISON, EDWARD/WITTER, JAMES/CHAPLIN, JOHN/HATTER/HOUSHAW/HEARNE, PETER/DRAYTON, THOMAS/DUGEE, PETER/LORIDGE/PETERSON, RICHARD

Locations: JAMES ISLAND/BERKELEY COUNTY/STONO RIVER/NEWTOWN CREEK

Type: MEMORIAL/

It has been shown that part of the original 500 acre Du GuŽ grant was sold to Samuel Du Bourdieu and by him to Peterson. By 1733 another parcel had been sold and was in the hands of the Screvens:

Series Number: S111001 

Volume: 0005 

Page:  00151 

Item: 01 

Date: 1733/04/09

Description: SCREVEN, SARAH AND WILLIAM SCREVEN, MEMORIAL FOR 90 ACRES ON NEW TOWN CREEK, JAMES ISLAND, ORIGINALLY PART OF A 500 ACRE TRACT, SUMMARIZING A CHAIN OF TITLE TO A GRANT TO JAMES DUGNE, SR. (2 PAGES)

Names Indexed: SCREVEN, SARAH/SCREVEN, WILLIAM/DUGNE, JAMES SR./SCREVEN, SAMUEL/HERNE, PETER/DRAYTON, THOMAS/DENNIS, LAWRENCE/WRAGG, JOSEPH/DUGNE, PETER/DRAKE, SAMUEL/HERNE, PETER

Locations: NEWTOWN CREEK/JAMES ISLAND/BERKELEY COUNTY

Type: MEMORIAL/

Topics: ESTATE DISPOSITIONS/

No later record has been found that shows Peter Dugue as owner of any part of the Newtown Creek property, or record of sale of the property by him or his heirs. If Peter actually acquired the 500 acres of land for which a warrant was issued in 1697, no record of it survives.

James Dugue, son of Peter and Dorothy Dugue

Evidence from land records places James DuguŽ in St. DorothyÕs Parish in 1737, and later, in 1750, purchasing land in St. James Parish.

1746 FA Deed for James Dugue to Richard Reader (Liber 130 1746 Folio 407).  In 1754 Richard Reader owned land in St. AndrewÕs (20 acres) and St. GeorgeÕs (880 acres) parishes.[96] In 1749 John Grey bought land from James Dukes (Liber 138 1749 Folio 91).

A John Gray is listed in St. GeorgeÕs Parish and in Kingston:[97]

GRAY, JOHN M.A. St. George 1745, '47.

GRAY, JOHN (Gray & Hunter )  M.D. Kingston 1768.

A William Gray was buried in St. CatherineÕs Parish in 1755.[98]  In 1672 a William Grey sold land in St. CatherineÕs Parish to Sir Thomas Lynch (Lib 4 fol' 84). [99] William Gray was listed as a landowner with 720 acres in St. CatherineÕs in 1670.[100] In 1768 a William Gray was Provost Marshall of Jamaica.[101] A Henry Grey was a planter in Vere Parish in 1726 (Liber 17, Folio 90).[102]

Abel Castlefrank was a landowner in St. James Parish in 1754, having 696 acres.[103] He sold land to James Dugue in 1750 (Liber 140 1750 Folio 54).

James Irving of St. James Parish, Jamaica, (northwest Jamaica) was sold land by James Dugue in 1754 (Liber 166 1757 Folio 79). Irving had South Carolina associations:[104]

MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 105

115.

THE HONBLE. JAMES IRVING, ESQ. LATE CUSTOS OF TRELAWNY, DIED 21st NOVEMBER, 1798, AGED 49 YEARS.

THE Irvings, owners of Ironshore and Hartfield, in St. James' parish. James, eldest son of Dr. James Irving, obtained Ironshore, from John Lawrence, in exchange for an estate in South Carolina. James Irving, the younger, was Custos of Trelawny, and represented that parish, in the Assemblies of 1774, 1781, 1787, 1790, and 1796. This was a branch of the family of Irving of Robgill Tower, Dumfriesshire, represented by Sir Paulus Aemelius Irving, Bart.

In 1774 James Irving was recorded as owning the sugar plantation Ironshore in St. James Parish, with 12 men bearing arms, 4 women and children, 254 slaves, 20 stock, 190 Hhds. and  0 TRCS.[105] Ironshore is still extant, and is beautifully situated overlooking the sea east of Montego Bay Point.

According to SCDAH records in 1755 a James Irving sold Goose Creek, SC, land to Richard Dunn Lawrence (also indexed by SCDAH as Richard DunnLaurens):

Series Number: S372001 

Volume: 02Q0 

Page: 00168

 Item:00 

Date: 1755-1756

Description: IRVING, JAMES AND WIFE TO LAURENCE RICHARD DUNN, ENFEOFFMMENT FOR 1,452.5 ACRES OF LAND IN ST. JAMES GOOSE CREEK.

Names Indexed: IRVING, JAMES/DUNN, LAWRENCE RICHARD/

Locations: SAINT JAMES GOOSE CREEK PARISH/

Type: ENFEOFFMENT/

However, Richard Dunn Lawrence defaulted on this purchase.[106] The Dunns were a Montego Bay, St. JamesÕ Parish, Jamaica, family, descended from Richard Dunn. The Dunns of St. James married into the Lawrence family several times.[107] The first Lawrence-Dunn connection was quite early; the relict of Richard Dunn married the first John Lawrence of Jamaica.[108] The South Carolina family may or may not be connected to that of Jamaica.

The daughter of John Lawrence II and Susanna Petgrave Lawrence, Rachael, married Jeremiah Downer.[109] James Dugue also had business dealings with George Downer of St. James Parish. In 1750 John Lawrence owned 5620 acres of land in Jamaica (the published list does not include owners of fewer than 5000 acres).[110]

The first listing for a James Irving in the SCDAH records:

Series Number:S213003 

Volume: 002E 

Page: 00374 

Item:00 

Date: 1740/03/20

Description: IRVING, JAMES, OF CHARLES TOWN TO MAJOR WILLIAM STEWART, OF NEW PROVIDENCE, BAHAMAS, BOND OF 420 POUNDS STERLING TO PAY STEWART TWO HUNDRED TEN POUNDS STERLING FOR OBTAINING FOR IRVING THE POSITION OF SURGEON TO THE NEW PROVIDENCE INDEPENDENT COMPANY OF FOOT FORMERLY HELD BY STEWART. (2 PAGES)

Names Indexed: IRVING, JAMES//////////////STEWART, WILLIAM//

Locations: //////CHARLESTON/NEW PROVIDENCE/BAHAMA ISLANDS

Type: BOND///////

Topics: //////NEW PROVIDENCE INDEPENDENT COMPANY OF FOOT/COMMISSION, MILITARY/MEDICINE, PRACTICE OF/

This James Irving, surgeon, could be the Dr. James Irving who was father of James Irving who acquired Ironshore near Montego Bay Point.

SCDAH Listings for a James Irving, Charleston merchant, refer to merchant activities involving Jamaica, Cuba, Santo Domingo, and North Carolina in the early 1750Õs.[111]

A William Stewart of South Carolina was a son-in-law of Arthur Hall and an associate of William Duke of Christ Church Parish, SC. Arthur Hall was heavily involved in Jamaican merchant activities, as was William Stewart.

George Bonner had real estate transactions with James Dukes in 1750 and 1753 (FA Deed for James Dukes to George Bonner Liber 151 1753 Folio 29; BA Deed for George Bonner to James Dukes Liber 141 1750 Folio 184.). Bonner was a landowner in St. DorothyÕs Parish (Caribbeana Vol. II).

George Bonner and others in his family held land in both St. DorothyÕs and St. AnnÕs parishes during the 18th century.[112] Freeman Bonner was listed as owner of 88 acres in St. DorothyÕs Parish in 1754.[113] George Bonner of Kingston, carpenter, married Mary Ward in Kingston on 21 Dec 1754.[114] John Bonner was in St. CatherineÕs Parish by 1670.[115] George Bonner was a JP in St. CatherineÕs in 1751.[116]

John Turner purchased land from James Dukes in 1753 (FA Deed for James Dukes to John Turner Liber 154 1753 Folio 111). Turners appear in the early marriage indexes of St. CatherineÕs Parish.[117] A John Turner owned land in Santa Cruz, Jamaica, in the 1740Õs.[118]  There was also a John Turner in Charleston with interesting connections: The Pallas, a 200 ton ship, John Turner, master, was registered in 1774 in Charleston to owners that included the James Laurens of the Laurens family of South Carolina, and also Peter Bacot.[119]

George Downer was a Jamaican landowner in 1754 in the St. James (northwest Jamaica) and Vere (adjacent St. DorothyÕs) parishes.[120]In 1759 he sold land to James Dugue (BA Deed for George Downer to James Dugue Liber 176 1759 Folio 74). As noted above, Jeremiah Downer married a daughter of John Lawrence II.

James DugueÕs will (Jamaica Liber 36, Folio 239) is dated 1766, and identifies him as a resident of St. Andrews Jamaica:

Will for James Dugue Liber 36 1766 Folio 239

Will of James Dugue Liber 36 1766 Folio 129

The text is as follows:

Dugue James Proved 2 Octob. 1766

Jamaica

In the Name of God Amen I James Dugue of the Parish of St. Andrews in the County of Surry in the said Island Gentleman being weak in body but of sound and disposing mind and memory Do make and Ordain this my last will and Testament first and principally I recommend my Soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it me and my Body I commit to the Earth to be Decently Interred at the Discretion of my Executrix and Executor hereinafter named and as touching the Disposition of all such Worldly Estate as it hath pleased almighty God to bestow upon me I give and Dispose thereof as followeth First I will and direct that all my just Debts and funeral Expenses be paid and Discharged by my Executrix and Executor hereinafter named and after payment thereof I give Devise and Bequeath unto my loving Sister Mary Burnside all that piece or parcel of Land Situate lying and being in the said parish of Saint Andrew Containing by Estimation four acres and a half or thereabouts, be the same more or less, Formerly the property of my Dear mother Dorothy Roycroft and late the Property of my loving Sister Dorothy Dugue to hold the said piece or parcel of Land and Premises with the Appurtenances unto my said Sister Mary Burnside for and during the Term of her Natural life and from and after her Decease I give Devise and bequeath the said Piece or parcel of land and Premises with the appurtenances unto my loving kinswoman Mary Ann Brown and to her heirs and assigns To the only use and behoof of the said Mary Ann Brown her heirs and assigns of ever and to and for no other use intent or purpose whatsoever also I give Devise and bequeath unto my said Kinswoman Mary Ann Brown my negro Woman Slave named Monimia To hold to my said Kinswoman for and during the term of her natural life and from and after her Decease it is my will and I do hereby manumize and for ever set free my said negro Woman Slave named Monimia from all manner of Slavery and Servitude for ever and all the rest residue and remainder of my Estate both real and personal I give Devise and bequeath unto my loving niece Elizabeth Brown of the said Parish of Saint Andrew Widow to hold the same and every part and parcel thereof unto my said niece Elizabeth Brown for and during the term of her natural life and from and after her Decease I give Devise and bequeath the same and every part and parcel thereof unto my nephew Thomas Burnside of the said parish of Saint Andrew Esquire and Joseph Pope of the Parish of Kingston in the said Island Esq. and to their heirs To the only use and behalf of the said Thomas Burnside and Joseph Pope their heirs and assigns for ever In Trust Nevertheless and to and for the only use and behalf of my loving kinsman Andrew Brown son of my said Niece Elizabeth Brown until he shall arrive to the age of Twenty one years, and upon his arriving to the age of Twenty one years then I give Devise and bequeath the said residuum of my Estate unto the said Andrew Brown his Heirs and assigns for ever and in case my said Kinsman Andrew Brown shall happen to die before he arrives to his said age of Twenty one years then and in such case I give Devise and bequeath the same and every part thereof unto my two Kinswomen Sarah Groves Brown and Dorothy Francis Brown Daughters of my said niece Elizabeth Brown and to their Heirs for ever and to and for no other use intent or purpose whatsoever and Lastly I do hereby nominate and appoint my said Niece Elizabeth Brown and the said Joseph Pope the Executrix and Executor of this my last will and testament hereby revoking and making void all former and other wills by me at any time heretofore made IN Witness whereof I have to this my last will and Testament consisting of Two Sheets of Paper to the first Sheet set my hand to the last set my hand and affixed my Seal this Twenty ninth day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and Sixty four -- Jas. Dugue

Signed Sealed published and Declared by the said Testator as and for his last will and Testament in the Presence of us who in his presence and at his request have Subscribed our names as Witnesses hereto --

Sarah Pope. . . .

Jos. Sparkes . . .

Saml. Burnside . . .

Memororandum this Second day of October 1766 Personally came and appeared before me Saml. Burnside and made oath upon the holy Evangelists of Almighty God that he was present and see James Dugue the Testator within mentioned being then of sound mind and memory sign seal publish and Declare the within written Instrument contained in two Sheets of paper to be his last will and Testament and that at the same time Sarah Pope and Joseph Sparkes were also present and together with him Subscribed their names as Witness to the same in the presence of the said Testator and further that he knows nothing of any other will since made by the said Testator which may tend to the Disadvantage fo the will within written --- Roger Hope Ellotson.

The will establishes that James Dugue of Jamaica was the son of Peter and Dorothy DuguŽ. Dorothy Roycroft owned four acres of land in St. DorothyÕs Parish in 1754.[121] In 1737 she sold or gave land to James Dugue (Liber 101 1737 Folio 31). She was identified in his will as his mother, and can therefore be identified as Dorothy Struyse DuguŽ, widow of Peter DuguŽ. The 1737 deed from Dorothy Roycroft to James Dugue places the death of Peter DuguŽ before that year, when Dorothy had remarried, to an unknown Roycroft.

The James DuguŽ also will demonstrates that Dorothy DuguŽ, sister of this James DuguŽ, never married. Mary DuguŽ, daughter of Peter and Dorothy, married a Burnside. The other Jamaican wills that reference the DuguŽs show that she married Andrew Burnside. The Burnside family appears to be centered in St.AndrewÕs Parish.[122] In 1753 Andrew Burnside owned 480 acres in St. AndrewÕs.[123] DorothyÕs baptismal record is preserved in the parish records; that of Mary is not.

The James Dugue will shows that Andrew and Mary Burnside had a son, Thomas Burnside. Niece Elizabeth Brown is listed with her children, and may be a daughter of the Burnsides, a speculation supported by her naming a son Andrew. Sarah Groves Brown and Dorothy Francis Brown were also children of niece Elizabeth Brown. The will of Mary Burnside, dated 23 Mar 1769, establishes the death of Mary DuguŽ Burnside, daughter of Peter and Dorothy DuguŽ (Jamaica Wills Liber 38 Folio 58).

 

Isaac Dugue

Isaac Dugue is first documented by the St. Julien List;

15. PIERRE DUGUƒ, Isaac Dugue, son frre, et ƒlizabeth DuguŽ, leur sŸur, nŽz ˆ BŽsance en Bery, enfans de Jacques DuguŽ et d'ƒlizabet Dupuy. 

Isaac Dugue was the youngest son, a minor at the time his fatherÕs estate was settled in 1696.[124] He was the son of Elizabeth DuPuy DuguŽ, and was presumably born not too long before his sister Elizabeth, who was born in South Carolina after the familyÕs immigration in 1685. Thus it is reasonable to suppose that Isaac was born in about 1682-4.

In the settlement of Jacques DuguŽÕs estate in 1696, Isaac received, with his sister Elizabeth who later married Paul Trapier, Òpart of a town lot in Charles Town, on Broad Street, which James DuguŽ purchased of James DeBourdeaux, blacksmith, together with the buildings thereon, and £4. 12. 4.Ó

Jamaica parish records on IsaacÕs family are incomplete. There is no marriage record. The documentation begins with the christening of a child in 1709:[125]

Clarendon Parish Register, Vol. I:

p. 27              Elizabeth, daughter of Isaac and Mary Dugue, baptized 27 Dec 1709

There is then a substantial gap. The next reference is 14 years later, in an adjacent parish:[126]

St. DorothyÕs Parish Register, Vol. I:

p. 3                baptized Grace, daughter of Isaac and Mary Dugue, 5 Apr 1723

p. 4                buried Isaac Dugue, 1731

p. 7                baptized unnamed daughter of Eleanor Rogers by Hugh Dugue, 24 Oct 1739

p. 8                buried Hugh Dugue, 5 Feb 1741

p. 13              Grace Dugue married John Skinner 13 Jan 1749

p. 14              buried Mary Dugue, widow, age 67, 29 Sep 1749

St. DorothyÕs Parish was separated from Clarendon Parish in 1696, so the shift in IsaacÕs parishes over the years is not the result of St. DorothyÕs separation from Clarendon Parish. It is possible that loss of records in St. DorothyÕs parish, probably in the hurricane of 1722, led to the gap in recorded baptisms.

With an interval of 14 years between the documented children, Isaac could easily have had seven or even more children in addition to those shown in the registers. The St. DorothyÕs Parish references to Hugh Dugue confirm the existence of additional children besides those christened in the two parishes. 

The following references from the Kingston Parish, Jamaica, Register[127] document the death of three DuguŽ sons:

Vol. I:

p. 3 Dugay, James, buried 3 Nov 1722

p. 7 Dugue, Thomas, buried 1 Jan 1723

p. 8 Dugue, William, buried 22 Jan 1723

Since James DuguŽ who died in Jamaica in 1766 was the son of Peter and Dorothy DuguŽ; the James DuguŽ who died in 1722 was apparently a son of Isaac DuguŽ. Thomas and William might have belonged to either brother. It has previously been noted that these deaths probably arose as a consequence of the terrible events of 1722 in Jamaica.

The following reference shows that in 1724 Isaac sold his interest in property in Charleston to Paul Trapier, who had married his younger sister Elizabeth:[128]

Book D, p. 92, 6 Aug 1724, Deed of Sale. Isaac Dugue, shipwright, to his brother-in-law, Paul Trapier, planter, for £250 SC money, ½ of ¼ of a half town lot in Charleston. Whereas James Dugue Sr., father of Isaac, by will dated 28 May 1686 gave his 5 children, Isaac, Peter, Mary, Judith & Elizabeth, and his granddaughter Mariane Dugue all his real and personal estate, share & share alike; and whereas the estate was duly divided on 27 Oct 1696, among other things allowing Isaac Dugue & his sister Elizabeth (in equal halves) a certain part of a lot in Charleston being ¼ of ½ of 1 town lot fronting to the Broad Street, bounding S on the Broad Street, E on Dr. John Deleaure, W & N on Elizabeth Burtell, which part of a lot their father James had purchased from James Dubourdeaux, blacksmith, on 31 Oct 1687; and whereas Paul Trapier by marrying Elizabeth Dugue became heir to ½ of the ¼ part of the ½ town lot & half the buildings; now Isaac Dugue sells his half to Trapier. Witnesses: James Searon, Peter Herman, Anthony Bonneau, Jr., Before Thomas Hepworth. Jacob Motte, Registrar.

IsaacÕs ownership of the Charleston property in 1724 suggests that he had continuing interests there. However, it is not hard to understand his sale of his interest in 1724. He doubtless needed the money, and a shared interest in Charleston property might have helped his economic recovery. He was apparently present in Charleston for the sale, since he acted on his own behalf. It is likely that there were many visits to Charleston over the years.

Anthony Bonneau, Jr., who was a witness to this 1724 sale of property interest by Isaac DuguŽ to Paul Trapier, later reappears among the witnesses to the will of John Snow in St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, along with Thomas Goodman Duke. Bonneau owned land in both St. Johns and St. Thomas and St. Denis parishes, and lived on the Wando River in St. Thomas and St. Denis. This is one of many specific family connections shared by the people named Dugue and Duke in the Charleston area. In 1766, Henry Simons married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Goodman Duke and his wife Susanna. HenryÕs parents were Samuel Dupre Simons and Elizabeth Bonneau, daughter of Anthony Bonneau Sr. and Jeanne Elizabeth Videau. Later, Frances Bonneau of Charleston was a surety for the estate of David Watts, administered by Benjamin Duke, son of Thomas Goodman Duke.[129]

Paul Trapier I did not remain in possession of the Broad St. property very long. In his will dated 15 Jan 1726/27 and probated 10 Nov 1727 he left the property to hi son Paul, a minor at that time. His plantation La Grande Fontaine he left to sons Isaac and Benjamin.[130]

In 1740 Mary ÒWrightwrickÓ sold land to Mary Dugue: BA Deed for Mary Wrightwrick to Mary Dugue Liber 109 1740 Folio 24. No other Wrightwrick references have been found. LDS has no listings for this name or any close equivalents. However, Wightwick does produce a listing:[131]

JOHNSON, JOHN

 St. Catherine, Planter.

 In 1746 a private act was passed to entitle his reputed daughter Anne and her son Thomas Wightwick to the same rights &c., with English subjects.

A Jacob Johnson married the daughter of John Lawrence of Ironshore.[132] Ironshore was traded to James Irving for land in South Carolina.

In 1731 there is a deed Mary Dugue to John Jones (Liber 89 Folio 160).

In 1749 Mary Dugue sold land to James Davidson: FA Deed for Mary Dugue to James Davidson Liber 133 1748 Folio 73.

No information has been found on a Davidson of the correct time period. A William Davison owned land in St. AndrewÕs Parish in 1670.[133] The estate of a James Davidson was inventoried in St. AnnÕs Parish (1B/11/3/115 Folio 125).

The will of Mary Dugue identifies her as a widow of St. DorothyÕs Parish. The will was written  14 Jun 1749 and was recorded on 8 Feb 1776  (Liber 43 1776 Folio 22). It mentions daughter Grace wife of John Skinner mariner, who parish records show she married in 1749.

Mary also mentions grandsons John Philip Boist and Robert Boist. She also mentions daughter Margaret wife of George Shells Mariner. The Boists may be children of daughter Margaret from a previous marriage. They do not belong to Grace, who married John Skinner as a Dugue and was therefore not previously married.

The will text is as follows:

Dugue, Mary Proved 8th Febry. 1776.1

Jamaica Is.

In the Name of God, Amen. I Mary Dugue of Old Harbour in the parish of St. Dorothy Widow being sick in Body but of sound Mind and Memory do make this my last Will and Testament in Manner and form following. Imprimis I commit my Body to the Eart to be decently buried at the Discretion of my Executor hereafter mentioned and my Soul to Almighty God. And as to my temporal affairs I give devise and bequeath to my beloved Daughter Grace, Wife of John Skinner Mariner the House where she now dwells with every Thing thereto belonging also twelve acres of Land and the following Negroe Slaves vis Mimba and her two Children Cato and Charity, Grace and her Child Diligence and Jimmy also One new Feather Bed and Escritore and one half o fall my linen and cloaths to her for her Life and after her Decease to her two natural Children John and Mary to be equally divided between them or to the Survivors of them, in case either of them should die before the age of twenty one years and in case they should both die before they arrive to the age of twenty one years then to the heirs of the Body of my said Daughter Grace lawfully begotten, but on failure thereof to my Grandsons John Philip Boist and Robert Boist to be equally divided between them or the Survivor of them and their Heirs.

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Margaret Wife of George Shells Mariner the House at the Bay wherein I now live with all the furniture and whatever thereto belongs, except what part thereof I have hereinbefore devised to my Daughter Grace, also six acres of Land part of what I now rent to Thomas Heanon (?) Esqur. and the following negroe Slaves vis Primas, Tom, Abba, Clarenda, and Phillis to her and her Heirs lawfully begotten forever.

Item I give and bequeath to my Grandson John Philip Boist my negroe Boy Pontach to him and his Heirs forever. [Illegible line referring to same heir inserted . . . .]

Item I give and bequeath to my beloved Daughters Grace and Margaret all the Residue and Remainder of my Estate after payment of my just Debts, whether Stock Bonds Debts Notes Bonds Horses Mares Cattle or whatever I shall dispose of to be equally divided between them at the Discretion of my Executor hereinafter mentioned. And I here by make my good friends John Hein(?) and Francis Chapman of Old Harbor Bay in the Parish of St. Dorothy Executors of this my last Will and Testament. Hereby [illegible . . . .]  made declare this to be my last Will and Testament --

In Witness wereof I have hereunto set my Hand and fixed my Seal the fourteenth Day of June in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven hundred and Forty nine.

The Mark MD of Mary Dugue x

Signed Sealed and delivered in the Presence of us . . .

Ed. Jones

Thos. Smith

John Jennings

Memorandum this 8th February 1776 Personally came and appeared before us John Walker of the Parish of Kingston Merchant and made oath on the Holly Evangelists that he was acquainted with Thomas Smith and John Jennings deceased two fo the subscribing Witnesses to the above and within written Will for some years before their respective Deaths and is acquainted with their respective [illegible} and Character of Hand-writing and that he verily believes these names Tho. Smith and John Jennings set and subscribed as two of the Witnesses to the above and within written Will to be of the proper Hand writing of the said Thomas Smith and John Jennings and for Cause of such his Knowledge and Believe saith that he hath frequently seen them severally write and subscribe their respective Names; and further that he hath heard and verily believes Edward Jones the other subscribing Witness to the said Will is also since dead and further that he knows Nothing of any other will being made by the said Testator which may tend to the Disadvantage of the Will within and above written. Basil Keith.

James Dugue, Mary Dugue, and James Duke References in Jamaica

Research by Cynthia Rosers identified the following from Jamaican records:

Genealogical Research #1

Repositories:

The Registrar GeneralÕs Department

Jamaica Archives

Records searched:

¯                    RM Wills Volume 1

¯     RM Wills Volume 2

¯     FA Deeds 1 to 6 (Indexed by SellerÕs Name)

¯     BA Deeds 1 to 5 (Indexed by BuyerÕs Name)

¯     St. Dorothy Baptism, Marriages and Burials Index Volume 1 1722 0 1825

¯     Index of Land Patents

Entries Found:

Will for James Dugue Liber 36 1766 Folio 239

Will for Mary Dugue Liber 43 1776 Folio 22

Will for Moses Duke Liber 118 1837-1838 Folio 86]

Will of Andrew Burnside Liber 2 1672 Folio 79

Will of Andrews Burnside Liber 26 1746 Folio 88

Will of Mary Burnside Liber 38 1768 Folio 58 (obtained)

Will of James Dugue Liber 36 1766 Folio 129

Will of Andrew Burnside Liber 80 1808 to 1809 Folio 185

FA Deed for Edward Duke to Edward Leomans Liber 8 1676 Folio 22

FA Deed for Thomas Duke to Amy Bluier Liber 50 1713 Folio 7

FA Deed for Isaac Dugue to Thomas Birmingham Liber 54 1715 Folio 185

FA Deed for Edward Dukes to Lurt Noe Liber 72 1724 Folio 45

FA Deed for Gabriel Margaret Galio Duguene to Richard Bassnett Liber 72 1724 Folio 228

FA Deed for Mary Dugue to John Jones Liber 89 1731 Folio 160

FA Deed for James Dugue to Richard Reader Liber 130 1746 Folio 407

FA Deed for Mary Dugue to James Davidson Liber 133 1748 Folio 73

FA Deed for James Dukes to John Grey Liber 138 1749 Folio 91

FA Deed for James Dukes to George Bonner (St. DorothyÕs Parish) Liber 151 1753 Folio 29

FA Deed for James Dukes to John Turner Liber 154 1753 Folio 111

FA Deed for James Dugue to James Irving Liber 166 1757 Folio 79

FA Deed for John West to Thomas Duke Liber 40 1706 Folio 32

BA Deed for Amy Parker to Frances Duke Liber 50 1713 Folio 63

BA Deed for Dorothy Roycroft to James Dugue Liber 101 1737 Folio 31

BA Deed for Mary Wrightwrick to Mary Dugue Liber 109 1740 Folio 24

BA Deed for Abel Castlefrank to James Dugue Liber 140 1750 Folio 54

BA Deed for George Bonner to James Dukes Liber 141 1750 184

BA Deed for George Downer to James Dugue Liber 176 1759 Folio 74

Baptism of Grace Dugue

Baptism of Miss Dugue

Marriage of Grace Dugue

Burial of Isaac Dugue

Burial of Hugh Dugue

Burial of Mary Dugue

Land Patent to Mary Dugue

James Dukes in Wills and Land Record

References to James Dukes are as follows:

FA Deed for James Dukes to John Grey Liber 138 1749 Folio 91

FA Deed for James Dukes to George Bonner Liber 151 1753 Folio 29

FA Deed for James Dukes to John Turner Liber 154 1753 Folio 111

BA Deed for George Bonner to James Dukes Liber 141 1750  Folio 184

Thus his earliest date is 1749, the latest is 1753.

James Dugue in 18th Century References in Charleston

A James DuguŽ appears in South Carolina records between 1725 and 1766 in various contexts. Both Jacques DuguŽ and his son James were deceased in 1696. The only later James Dugue who might have had an active real estate interest in Charleston is James, son of Peter and Dorothy Dugue of Jamaica.

Tracing the history of the lots in question is greatly complicated by changes in Charleston lot numbers over time, but most later references can be traced to 17th century properties owned by Jacques/James Dugue. On the whole, the references point to the DuguŽ family (not an 18th century resident named James DuguŽ, but heirs of the original immigrant Jacques DuguŽ) retaining property in Charleston through at least the mid-1720Õs, and disposing of most of that property by the mid-1740Õs. So long as the property remained in the family, there seems to have been little effort to update the registered deeds for these properties. The references therefore do not establish that another individual named James Dugue was present in Charleston, but that the family of Peter and Isaac DuguŽ maintained property in Charleston for decades after their departure for Jamaica.

Lot #70/78, Charleston

The following archival reference states that James Dugue filed a memorial for Lot #70 in Charleston in 1732:

Series No.: S111001 

Volume: 0001 

Page: 00156 

Item:00 

Date: 1732

Description: DUGUE, JAMES, MEMORIAL FOR A TOWN LOT IN CHARLES TOWN, EXHIBITING A CONVEYANCE DATED APR. 19, 1692 FROM ROBERT SKELTON TO JAMES DUGUE.

Names Indexed: SKELTON, ROBERT/DUGUE, JAMES/

Locations: CHARLESTON/

Type: MEMORIAL/CONVEYANCE

The actual document is the original deed transferring the lot from Skelton to James Dugue. Skelton is identified as a cordwainer. The document bears a date of 1692. It refers to Lot #78 rather than #70. Lot #78 was originally granted to Bernard Schingkingh. The memorial was witnessed by F. GuŽrard, Wm. White, ?,? and Is. ?. There is no document asserting that the memorial itself was filed in 1732 by anyone named James Dugue, although the archivist indexed the item under that name.

This is property that was disposed of in Jacque DuguŽÕs estate settlement in 1696. Lot #70 was inherited by Marianne DuguŽ, daughter of the then-deceased James Dugue (II) and his wife Marianne Fleury de la Plane DuguŽ.[134] Marianne DuguŽ later married Tobias Fitch.

In 1720 Tobias and Marianne Fitch sold the northern half of #70 to Andrew Dupuy. Dupuy was probably a relative; Jacques DuguŽÕs second wife was Elizabeth Dupuy.[135]

Book E, p. 136. 11 & as July 1720. Tobias Fitch, planer, & Marianne, his wife, daughter of James Dugue, Mr. & of Dame Marian Henry his wife & granddaughter of James Dugue, Sr., to Andrew Dupuy, merchant, of Charleston, for £200 SC money, the northern half of lot #70 in Charleston, divided in middle of E & W lines, bounding N on Barnard Schenckingh; S on other half; E on west side of a street parallel with Cooper River. Whereas James Dugue, Sr., possessing a good estate & half of lot #70 in Charleston, by will dated 28 May 1696 gave his granddaughter Marianne 1/6 of his real & personal estate ordaining, that should any of his children, under age, should want a division made to obtain his part, the same should proceed by the advice of the majority, the others not to appeal, appointing his son Peter Dugue sole executor; & whereas on 27 Oct. 1696 Peter Dugue, executor, agreed with Samuel Dubondieu, Esq., & Judith his wife, James Dubose and Mary his wife, & Marianne, widow of James Dugue, Jr., on behalf o her daughter Marianne, wife of Tobias Fitch, that Marianne (wife of James Dugue, Jr.,) for her daughter Marianne should take & keep as her share at the expiration of 1-1/2 years, town lot #70; now Fitch sells Dupuy half of lot #70. Witnesses: Robert Hume, William Harvey, John Royer. Before John Croft, M.C. Jacob Motte, Register.

In this 1720 document, Fitch cites Barnard Schenckingh as adjacent landowner on the north side of the lot in question. Schenckingh was the recipient of the original grant for Lot #78, which seems to have been the earlier designation for this same property. Schenckingh was deceased at this time; there was apparently a tendency not to record deeds showing changes in ownership that arose through inheritance, so that individuals citing adjacent landowners were sometimes decades out of date, the neighboring land having passed through several hands in the same family during the interim. For example, a 1743 deed by Sarah Trott Rhett for Lot #113, located near Lot #70 on the SW corner of Church and Queen streets, identifies Bernard Schenckingh as the owner of the property bounding south on hers (Charleston Deeds Book &, page 506).[136] Not only was Schenckingh deceased at this time, but the will of his son and heir, Benjamin Schenckingh, had been probated in 1733.[137] In contrast, RhettÕs deed identifies her neighbor on the west as ÒRichard Beresford (formerly Bernard Schenckingh). In that case, there was a sale outside the family, and a new deed was registered. This practice recurs many times in reviewing Charleston properties belonging to the DuguŽ family.

The location of Lot #70 is pertinent to interpreting some later references. Two transactions in 1766 place James Dugue adjacent Charleston Lot #31:.[138]

ÒBook E-3, p. 773. 16 & 17 June 1766    Daniel Ravenel, planter, of St. JohnÕs Parish, & Charlotte, his wife, 1 of the daughters of Paul Mazyck of Charleston; to Benjamin Mazyck, Esq. of Charleston, for £1000 SC money, half of lot #31 in Charleston, bounding S 53 ft. on Broad Street; N on James Dugue; E n Peter de St. Julien; W on other half formerly belonging to Edward Rawlins; which lot #31 Paul Mazyck had purchased from Isaac Mazyck, of Charleston . . . Ò

And also,

Book F-3, p. 19. 17 & 18 July 1766          Benjamin Mazyck of Charleston, to Daniel Ravenel, planter, of St. Johns Parish, for £1000 currency, half of lot #31 in Charleston, bounding N on James Dugue, S 53 ft. on Broad Street; E on Peter de St. Julien; W on other half belonging to Edward Rawlings; which lot #31 was purchased by Paul Mazyck from Isaac Mazyck, . . .Ó

 

It can be shown that the location referenced by the name James Dugue in this document is Lot #70, inherited by the Fitches from Jacques DuguŽ.

The early plan of Charleston shows two lots #30.[139] One fronts on Broad St. just below Lot #28 at the corner of Broad and Church streets. This Lot #30 has a Lot #31 immediately to the north. The other Lot #30 fronts on Broad St. a block farther west, east of an open market area that is a continuation of Meeting St. and also east of the SW corner of property labelled ÒMrs. Cross 3 Lots.Ó It has been found that the Lot #31 to which Mazyck and Ravenel refer above is in fact the one shown as Lot # 30 adjacent the market area and Mrs. CrossÕ three lots. This Lot #30 was originally granted to Edward Rawlings. His widow, Susannah Rawlings Wigginton, sold the western part of this lot to Royer in 1742:

Series Number: S372001 

Volume:  00X0 

Page: 00230 

Item: 00 

Date: 1742

Description: WIGGINTON, SUSAN AND OTHERS TO JOHN ROYERS, LEASE AND RELEASE FOR PART OF LOT NO. 30 IN CHARLESTOWN.

Names Indexed: WIGGINTON, SUSAN/ROYERS, JOHN/HEPWORTH, THOMAS/HEPWORTH, ANNE/BLAMYER, MARY/RAWLINGS, EDWARD/

Locations: CHARLESTON/

Type: LEASE AND RELEASE/

Topics: TOWN LOT SALES/

The following are some other transactions relevant to establishing the property in this location:

On 15 and 16 Sep 1719, Book X, page 230, ÒSusannah Wigginton, (formerly wife of Edward Rawlings) of 1st part; Thomas Hepworth, Esq., and & Anne his wife, Mary Blamyer, widow; & Edward Rawlings, joiner; Anne, Mary & Edward being children of Edward Rawlings, Sr., of 2nd part; John Royer, cordwainer, of 3rd part; all of Charleston. Whereas Edward Rawlings, Sr., by will dated 24 Sept. 1699 bequested to his loving wife Susannah all his real & personal estate for her natural life, with power to dispose of the estate for her maintenance & the bringing up of their children; & whereas she has agreed to sell John Royer half of lot #30 for £160 currency towards her maintenance . . . now Susannah Wigginton sells to Royer, for £160 currency, half of lot #30, fronting S 53 ft. on Broad Street, bounding E 187 ft. on Isaac Mazyck; W on vacant land laid out for a market.Ó[140]

On 7 and 8 Mar 1721, Charleston Deeds Book Bb, p. 11, Edward Rawlings and his wife Mary sold to Robert Hume 1/3 part of 3 lots in Charleston willed by Mary Cross to William Bailey, Susannah Rawlings & Mary Basden Òfronting N on a street leading E from Cooper River by Messrs. Gibbon & Allen (Queen St.) 2/3 parts of the whole front of said 3 lots on said street; S on Peter Manigault Òas now fenct inÓ & on Tobias Fitch; W on other parts said 3 lots; E on Richard Beresford Esq. (formerly Mr. Jackson).Ó[141]

On 11 Jan 1723 Susannah Rawlings Wiginton sold to Robert Hume part of 3 lots Òfronting N 100 ft. on a street running from Cooper River by the lots of Gibbon & Allen [Queen]; the depths back from N to S the whole depth of the 3 lots from N to S except 201 feet fenced in by Peter Manigault; bounding E on other part of the 3 lots belong to Susannah Wigonton; W on a street parallel with Cooper River toward the Presbyterian Meeting house.Ó[142]

On 23 and 24 Jul 1725, Book D, page 313, Peter and Anne Manigault sold to John Laurens Ò1/2 part of 3 lots near the market place in Charleston which were devised by Mary Cross . . . Òbounding S on market place; W on the street per fortifications; N on remaining part of the 3 lots now in possession of Edward Rollings; E on lots #30 & #69 & formerly known by #59 in model & records of Charleston.Ó[143]

On 16 and 17 Dec 1731, Book I, page 600, Susannah Wigington (formerly Susannah Rawlings, widow of Edward Rawlings, vintner) to Robert Hume, gentleman, . . . 1/6 part of 3 lots in Charleston, given by Mary Cross . . . fronting N 50 ft. on a street leading from Cooper River b y lots formerly belonging to Messrs. Gibbon & Allen, now to Mssrs. Tonnerville, Ellery, Cooper, & Capt. Warden; bounding S on land formerly belonging to Peter Manigault, now to Laurens or Bonneau & on Dupey [Dupuy] (formerly Tobias Fitch).Ó[144]

On 13 and 14 Apr 1737, Book S, page 57, John Beresford sold to John Bee the W part of lot #90, fronting 32 ft 7 in on S side of Queen St, running the whole depth of the lot; also lot #70 lying S of the above lot, the 2 parts of lots making 2 long square 32 ft 6 in and from Queen St. running S to lot of Mrs. Dupuy; bounding E on John Beresford, W on John Bee.[145]

After a recitation of the history of the three lots willed to Mary Cross, Book C-C, page 204, Alexander Hume on 23 and 24 Oct 1746 conveyed to Benjamin DÕHarriette the N half of the three lots of Mary Cross.[146]

On 10 and 11 Oct 1753, Book O-O, page 640, Benjamin de St. Julien, gentleman. . . to Elizabeth de St. Julien . . . Òthe E half of lot #56 in Charleston, bounding S 47 ½ ft. on Broad Street; N & W on Isaac MazyckÕs lots; E on estate of Joseph de St. Julien. Whereas the Lords Propres. On 24 Apr. 1683 granted John Palmer, Jr., lot #56 on N side of Broad St, & whereas the E half of the lot by various mesne conveyances became the property of Peter de St. Julien; . . .Ó[147]

Then, in 1756 Gabriel Manigault, Alexander Broughton, & Peter Manigault, executors of the will of Benjamin DÕHarriette, sold to Walter Izard the N division of 3 lots in Charleston, bounding N 150 ft. on Queen Street; W on John Bee; S on 197 ft. on a private alley (formerly Anthony Bonneau).Ó[148]

Altogether, these references place the lot attributed to James Dugue in 1766 east of the three lots granted to Mrs. Cross, north of Isaac Mazyck, west of land earlier in the possession of Edward Rawlings (and later others such as Robert Hume, Peter Manigault, and John Laurens), and NW of Peter St. Julien, who was in Lot #56. It also places this property in the approximate location of Lot #70, which Marianne Dugue Fitch and her husband Tobias Fitch inherited from Jacques [James] Dugue, and indicates that the property was between Broad and Church streets, and east of Meeting St.

 

The portion of Lot #70 sold by Beresford to John Bee in 1731, bounding south on Mrs. Dupuy, would have been the northernmost part of the portion of the lot that was purchased by Jacques DuguŽ, which was previously sold by Fitch to Andrew Dupuy. Mrs. Dupuy (or her heirs) apparently retained the remainder of the northern part of #70.

The original bill of sale between Skelton and DuguŽ, preserved as the memorial filed in 1733, appears to refer to transfer of the whole of Lot #78 to DuguŽ. The papers related to the disposition of the estate of Jacques DuguŽ refer to the property only as Lot #70, without evidence of partition. The documentation of the sale between Fitch and Dupuy similarly implies that a northern portion of the property was retained by Fitch. However, later evidence of Fitch ownership of that property has not yet been found in the available records.

Eastern Broad Street Area: Lot #28

There was on 14 Jun 1739 a lease and release transaction (Charleton Deeds Book T, p. 77) involving a parcel on the north side of Broad Street owned by Margaret Nicholl Ramsey, widow of John Ramsey. She was transferring her dower interest in the property to her son-in-law, John Crockatt. The lot became CrockattÕs residence. The document asserts that ÒWhereas John Ramsay owned part of a lot in Charleston fronting 26-1/2 ft. on the N side of Broad Street, bounding W 102 ft. on Mr. Dugue; E on Timothy Bellamy; N on Mrs. Brutell ; .  [149]

The neighbor mentioned in this first transaction, ÒMrs. BrutellÓ, was Elizabeth (Mrs. Peter) Burtell.  An adjacent lot to the north, No. 29, had been granted to Peter Burtell on 9 May 1694. In 1687 Burtell also purchased the northern half of Lot No. 28 at the corner of Broad and Church streets, which was originally granted to Joseph West. WestÕs portion was later at least in part held by Timothy Bellamy (WestÕs wife was a Bellamy) and was subdivided a number of times.

Peter Burtell was an elder of the Huguenot Church who, along with one of the DuguŽs, protested to the Lords Proprietors regarding discrimination against Huguenots by the locals in South Carolina.[150] In 1701 Peter Burtell died and his estate devolved to his heirs, including his wife Elizabeth and daughter Marie Elizabeth, who married Alexander Thesee de Chastaiger. The Chastaiger children, Alexander Thesee (who married Susanna Elizabeth LeNoble), Magdalene Elizabeth (who married Henry Izard), and Henrietta Charlotte (who married Nathaniel Broughton), were involved in subsequent transactions regarding the property.

Property within the southern half of #28, not purchased by Burtell, appeared in the 1725 will of Timothy Bellamy; Joseph WestÕs wife was Mary Bellamy.[151]

Hicks summarized the early history of lots #28 and #29:[152]

Ò28. 1682. Joseph West. Joseph West #28. Will of Timothy Bellamy. [Note: the widow, Mary Bellamy, md. Miles Brewton.] In 1687, Joseph West deeded ½ of lot 28 to Peter Burtell. Peter Burtell by will 1601 bequeathed the estate (after the death of his wife Elizabeth) to be divided equally among his 3 grandchildren, Alexander Chastaigner (father of Catharine wife of Paul Mazyck), Magdalain Elizabeth Chastaigner (wife of Ralph Izard), & Charlotte Henrietta Chastaigner (wife of Nathanial Broughton).

29. 1694. Peter Buretell/Burtell/Bruttell. In 1735 Ralph Izard and Magdalaine Elizabeth his wife, one of the grandda. & devisees of Peter Burtell, merchant; Nathanial Broughton and Charlotta Henrietta his wife, another granddau. & devisee of Peter Burtell; Paul Mazyck & Catharina his wife, gr granddau. Of Peter Burtell & only dau. & heir at law of Alexander Chastainger, grandson of one of the devisees of Peter Burtell – sold to Paul Jenys ½ of lot 28 and all of lot 29 [Charleston Deed Q:146].Ó

A 1745 transaction by Mary Bellamy clarifies the partitioning of Lot #28 to some extent:[153]

Book B-B, p. 386, 5 Mar 1745 Feoffment. Mary Brewton, widow of Miles Brewton, gentleman, of Charleston (lately Mary Bellamy), to Mathew Roche, merchant of Charleston, for £2000 SC money, & other considerations, all her claim to that part of lot #28 with the tenement thereon, adjoining the dwelling house where Timothy Bellamy, her late husband, lived, bounding E 100 Ft. on said dwelling house now owned by Mathew Roche; W on John CrockattÕs house (formerly Mrs. Catherine Leporter, then of Dr. John Delaune); N on the heirs of Mr. Jenys (formerly Madam Bretell); S 34 ft. on Broad St. Whereas Timothy Bellamy, merchant of Charleston, by will dated 25 Feb 1725 devised to his wife, Mary during her natural life, that part of lot #28 adjoining his dwelling house, with the tenement then to be built on the lot, & after her death to his daughter Ann Bellamy, now wife of Mathew Roche; now she releases her claim to Roche. Witnesses: John Rattray, James Grindlay. Witnesses to livery & seizing: Alexander Livie, John Rattray, James Grindlay. Before Jacob Motte, J.P. James Home, Publ Reg.

So, the 1739 Ramsey document shows John Crockatt becoming the owner of a lot bounding west on a portion of Lot#28 that belonged to James Dugue. The Crockatt residence was bounded north on Madam Brutell and later on Mr. Jenys and east on Timothy Bellamy.  The 1745 Mary Bellamy Brewton document indicates that John CrockettÕs house was previously the property of Mrs. Catherine Leporter  (LaPostre) and then of Dr. John Delaune before Crockett. She doesnÕt mention the Ramseys as earlier owners.

In Charleston Deeds Book D, page 92, we see that the property in which Isaac Dugue sold his interest in Aug 1724 to his brother-in-law Paul Trapier was the lot that Jacques DuguŽ had bought from Samuel DuBourdeaux, Òbeing ¼ of ½ of 1 town lot fronting to the Broad Street, bounding S on the Broad Street, E on Dr. John Deleauhe, W & N on Elizabeth Burtell.Ó This appears to be the lot – fronting E on Dr. Deleahe -- ÒDr. John DelauneÓ in the Brewton document – that Isaac Dugue inherited from Jacques (James) DuguŽ and in which he sold his interest to Paul Trapier in 1724.

On 9 and 10 Mar 1746 Charleston Deeds Book D-D, page 236, shows that Paul Trapier II and his wife Magdalen sold to John Paul GrimkŽ Òpart of a lot in Charleston fronting S 27 ft on Broad Street; . . . E on John Crockatt.Ó[154] The reference to Mr. Ramsay owning a lot bounding ÒW on James DugueÓ may simply have been obsolete at the time that it was written in 1739, but it is likely that Isaac DuguŽ and Paul Trapier didnÕt bother to record changes in ownership of this portion of Lot #28 at the death of James Dugue and the sale of IsaacÕs interest to Trapier, waiting until the property was sold out of the family in 1746 to register a new deed.

Western Broad Street Area

A series of transactions document the continued ownership of DuguŽ properties near Broad St. and King St. These properties appear to be in the same block (referring to the original very large blocks of the Charleston plan), but seem to refer to multiple lots in the possession of a James DuguŽ.

Lot #186

Lot #186 was among the original Jacques DuguŽ lot grants. It is shown on the map of early lot grants in a location fronting Meeting Street between Legare and Broad streets.[155] A 1725 transaction shows that by that year the eastern half of Lot #186 had been sold out of DuguŽ family ownership, but the western half was still owned by the DuguŽ family.

Book D:239. On 29 and 30 Mar 1725 John Brand, carpenter, sold to John Greenland, victualler, lot #164 and one half of lot #186. Brand described Lot #164 as ½ acre bounding N on the great street leading from Cooper River to the market place [Broad]; S on Joseph Wragg; E on a little street leading from Ashley River by Mr. JonesÕ lot; W on James Dugue. He described Lot #186 as bounding E on a little street leading from Ashley River to Mr. Jones lot; N & E on Mr. Crimston (formerly Jonas Bonhoste); W on part of the same lot belonging to Mr. Dugue.[156] #186 belonging to Mr. Dugue had been inherited by Peter Dugue in 1696 from the estate of Jacques [James] Dugue.

The description of these two lots canÕt be reconciled with the SCHM map of Charleston lots, which shows Lot #164 immediately north of Lot #186. Also, the SCHM map would identify the James DuguŽ property west of #164 as Lot #116, for which there is no record of DuguŽ family ownership. However, James DuguŽ was granted Lot #165; this could be that lot. It is also difficult to imagine how Mr. Crimston could be east of Lot  #186 if BrandÕs portion of that lot was a full one-half and also fronted on King St., as described.

Thomas Rose Jr. was the earliest grantee for Lot#228. [157]

Book A-A:503. In 1745 Henry Bedon and his wife Mary Ann sold to Joseph Watson one-half of lot #228 in Charleston, bounding W on part of the same lot (formerly William Smith); E on heirs of Elias Hancock (formerly John Elliott); S on Tradd Street; N on Capt. Edward Croft (formerly Mr. Duque). It is related that the property was granted in 1694 to Thomas Rose, whose heirs sold to Henry Samways, whose heirs sold ½ the lot to Isaac Holmes, bounding E on heirs of Elias Hancock; W on a lot formerly granted to William Smith and belonging to Catherine Smith; N on Capt. Edward Croft (formerly Duque), and that Isaac and Susanna Holmes in 1735 sold the half lot to Henry Bedon, bounding W on part of lot #228 belonging to Isaac Holmes.[158]

Edward Croft had acquired the lot north of #228 by 1735, as a deed in that year establishing the right-of-way of Friend Street shows.[159] Edward Croft was a brother of Childermas Croft, who was involved in Indian affairs and was one of the administrators of the estate of Joseph Pendarvis in 1735. The Croft family had ties to Jamaica; the 1731 will of Hill Croft mentioned land in Jamaica left to him by his aunt Sarah Austine, bequeathed to her by her father, John Childermas. Hill identified his brother Edward Croft, merchant of Charleston, as executor with Charles Pinckney, and John Laurens, saddler of Charleston, as guardian of his son.[160]

The 1745 deed by Bedon for Lot #228 is out of date with respect to the bounding property on the north, although Bedon was aware that the northern lot was no longer in the ownership of the DuguŽ family. In 1744 Edward Croft sold this property, identified by Croft as Lot #177, in two parcels to Henry Ward and to Thomas Cooper (Charleston Deeds Book Z, p. 239 and 247).[161]

No reference to ownership of this lot by Jacques DuguŽ has been found, and it was not part of his estate – unless it had previously been recorded as Lot #165, a lot granted to Jacques DuguŽ for which no location has been identified. If this was not Lot #165, it was likely purchased by Peter or Isaac DuguŽ.

#229

Lot #229 was originally granted to John Elliott.[162]

Book F: 61. On 27 and 28 Feb 1726 Richard Grimston transferred to Elias Hancock, vintner, lot #229 in Charleston containing ½ acre, purchased by Grimston from Thomas Dixon of James Island in Nov 1722. The property was described as Òbounding S on the little street leading from Cooper River by Richard Tradd to George Keeling; N on ÒMr. DugeeÓ [ÒDugueÓ in a second reference]; E on John Hill; W on Thomas Rose.Ó Witnesses were Edward Croft, Robert Randall, Thomas Bartram, and John Croft. [163]

In 1746 (Book F-F:55) Alexander Chisolm and his wife Judith sold to Sarah Stoutenburgh, widow, Lot #229, containing ½ acre, Òbounding S on the little street leading from Cooper River by Richard TraddÕs to George Keeling; N on Mr. Dugu; E on John Hill; W on Thomas Rose; which lot was purchased by Elias Hancock from Richard Gunston and Elinor his wife on 28 Feb 1726. Witnesses were Daniel Donovan and John Cattell. [164]

The Sarah Stoutenburgh mentioned here, the wife/widow of Luke Stoutenburgh, was the sister of Isaac Peronneau, who married Marianne Fitch, daughter of Tobias Fitch and Marianne DuguŽ Fitch.

Both references identify ÒMr. DugueÓ as current owner of the property to the north of Lot#229. However, the references to other bounding property owners (Hill, Rose) were obsolete at this time. The Dugue property north of Lot #229 might have been part of Lot #177 or could have been a separate property. On the SCHM map of early Charleston lots it is located immediately west of Lot #164, and could be Lot #165, owned by Jacque DuguŽ and inherited by Peter Dugue in 1696.

 

In1701 a Lot#165 was among those included in the estate of Peter Burtell, and was allocated to Nathaniel and Charlotte Henrietta Broughton. It is uncertain whether the number actually refers to the same lot. It seems unlikely that it was the same, since BroughtonÕs estate referred to a continuous series of lot numbers beginning with #165, and there was no such continuous series in this area.

Elizabeth Dugue Trapier

Elizabeth was the youngest of Jacques and Elizabeth DuguŽÕs children, and the only one born in South Carolina. The reference given previously regarding the town lot sale by Isaac Dugue shows that Paul Trapier married Elizabeth DuguŽ, youngest daughter of Jacques DuguŽ. She was unmarried and a minor at the time of her fatherÕs death in 1696. Trapier lived at his plantation, La Grande Fontaine, said by the Rev. Paul Trapier to have been at Eutaw Springs. [165] Paul Trapier, Jr., is said to have been born at La Grande Fontaine in 1701, and in 1701 Eutaw Springs was the backcountry. This is unlikely at this early date unless Trapier was trading with Indians, or simply trading Indians. Even fourteen years later, when John Hearn was killed there by Indians, Eutaw Springs was beyond the boundary of permanent European settlement.

Paul Trapier, Jr., was the owner of many ships (or parts thereof), in partnership with Daniel Horry, Joseph Wragg (who married Judith Dubose) and others.[166] Their lands were originally on the Cooper River around Pooshy Swamp (Series: S111001 Volume - 0003 Page - 00135 Item - 02 Date: 1733/05/19).  The family became wealthy. The Trapiers moved to the Georgetown SC area by 1740, where they were very successful in commerce.

Paul Trapier (grandson of Paul Trapier I and Elizabeth DuguŽ Trapier) was an executor of the estate of Anthony Bonneau III:

Series Number: S136002 

Box: 125A 

Item: 0063A 

ignore: 00 

Date: 1786

Description: HORRY, SARAH, HUGH HORRY AND PAUL TRAPIER, EXIX. AND EXORS. OF ANTHONY BONNEAU, SURVIVOR OF BONNEAU AND JAMEISON VS MARY BONNEAU AND STEPHEN FORD, THE YOUNGER, ADMIX. AND ADMOR. OF PETER BONNEAU, JUDGMENT ROLL.

Names  Indexed: HORRY, SARAH//HORRY, HUGH/TRAPIER, PAUL/BONNEAU, ANTHONY//BONNEAU AND JAMEISON/BONNEAU, MARY/FORD, STEPHEN, THE YOUNGER/BONNEAU, PETER/

Locations: //

Type: JUDGMENT-ROLL//

According to an on-line database by John James Simons III, Paul Trapier [II] was also an executor for Anthony Bonneau IIIÕs wife, Margaret Henrietta Horry Bonneau. Her 1758 will was witnessed by Joachim and Ann Zubly. Joachim Zubly was a Swiss Reformed minister. He obtained a grant in New Windsor Township in 1751.[167] In 1758 he is mentioned in a grant to Sarah Lemar that also references Ulrick Tobler as an adjacent landowner.[168] Ulrich Tobler was the grandfather of Barbara Fuster, third wife of Joseph Dukes of Orangeburg. However, Zubly also had property on the Wando River in Berkeley County.[169] SCDAH records also show property in Purrysburg in his name.

The Trapier-Bonneau connection continues a connection with the Anthony Bonneau family line that is repeated over and over with DuguŽs and D ukes in the lowcountry.

James Dugue of Goose Creek, A Questionable Character

It is has been suggested that James Dugue, son of Jacques DuguŽ I, lived in the Goose Creek area. However, some of the relevant references are too late to refer to this individual.

A reference places a J. Dugue family at Goose Creek in 1702:[170]

Among the French families prominent in this region were those of Antoine Prudhomme, John Boisseau, Abraham Fleury, Sieur de la Pleine, Peter Bacot, Henry Bruneau, Abraham DuPont, Pierre Dassau, Isaac Fleury (alias De France), Gideon Faucheraud, Elias Prioleau, Anthony Bonneau, Charles Franchomme, Benjamin Godin, Francis Guerin, Benjamin Marion, John Postell, Dr. Isaac Porcher, J. DuguŽ, Philip Trouillart, Paul Mazick, Isaac Peronneau, Ann LeBrasseur, Elie Horry, and Zachariah Villepontoux.

This reference to ÒFrench familiesÓ might include the widow and child, or the property, of the deceased Jacques DuguŽ II. However, there is another more specific reference to a James Dugue in 1702, several years after the documented deaths of Jacques DuguŽ and his son James.[171]

But in April, 1702, they wrote once more to the proprietors saying that the Assembly was again in "violent heats" about the election, that two members from Colleton were challenged and that debate had put the House in the "same ferment as before", concluding their complaint with their lands already bought may "be secured to them and their heirs".  The list contains the following French names: Noah Royer, Jonas Bonhost, Pierre Poinsett, Jr., Pierre Poinsett, Sr., Jourdain Colliandeau, [Elisha] Poinsett, James Dugue, James Dubose. James Lardine, Daniel Bonell, Jean le Birt, Abraham Le Sueur, Louis Tibou, A. Bonneau, Jean Girardeau, Peter Gaillard, Peter Colloando (Couillinado), Ann Vinne, [Londonderry] Corquett, Dan'l Duraso (DuRousseau); Mathu Garin, Paul Borquett, Noah Sere, John Potine, Philip Norman, James Serau, Augustin Varry, John Potell.

This anomaly in the records has not been explained.

Samuel DuguŽ

A Samuel Dugue/Duke appears in Charleston records. He is not a part of the immediate family of Jacques DuguŽ, but it is reasonable to suppose that he was a relative of some kind.

Samuel Dugue is included in two of the four 1702 lists of Frenchmen accused of voting illegally (when English residents attempted to disenfranchise them):[172]

MS Assembly Journal 1682-1701, pp. 471-7. List 1: Mathew Guerin, John Bonneau, Peter Mailliet, Abraham Dupont, Isaac La Pierre, John Serau, Paul La Roche, Abr. Lesueur, Nicholas Longuemar, Peter Collineau, List 2: John Deveaux, John Juine, James Dumoe, Nicholas Boneil, Samuel Dugue, Peter Dutart (Dutarre); Peter Poitevine, Monsr. Morbeuff, Peter Filleaux, Peter Gideau, Benj. Marion. List 3: Mathew Guerin, John Bonneau, Peter Maillett, Abraham Juijon, Paul La Roche, Abraham Lesurier (Le Serrurier); Paul Battoane, Elias Verbans, Nicholas Languemar, Salloman Legare. List 4: John Deveaux, James Dunoe, Nicholas Boneil, Samuel Dugue, Peter Dutart, Peter Poitvine, Monsr. Marbeuff, Peter Villepontoux, Peter Videau, Benj. Marion, Peter Lesau, Sr., Anthony Poitvine, Ja. Lasad, Gideon Lisile [or Soule], Sam'l Lisle, Wm. Rouser (Rousourier).

The Council demanded on 4 Apr 1702 and 14 Apr 1702 that various individuals appear and provide documentation of their right to vote. Samuel Dugue was on these lists, along with David FaurŽ.[173]

The estate of Samuel ÒDuckesÓ was probated between 1716 and 1718.[174] This is the first documented use of a ÒkÓ rather than ÒgÓ in the surname. The original inventory document for Samuel DuguŽ has been lost. However, no later DuguŽ or Duke males in the area were named Samuel.

It is likely that Samuel Duke/Duckes was the minister who was transferred from Charleston to St. JohnÕs Berkeley in 1701 to provide a minister for the early Huguenot church there.[175] The church was located between the later locations of Biggins and Black Oak churches.

An interesting, although probably unrelated, entry on a website giving notices from the Western Flying Post and Sherborne and Yeovil Mercury is:

1778 02 Nov DuGue Samuel - Holy Trinity Exeter merchant bankrupt

 

 

This document is copyright © 2007 by Lynn Teague. All rights reserved. The copyright must appear on all copies.

 

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[1] Roberts, Nathaniel Edward, Jr. 1984. South Carolina Land Grants to Huguenots 1674-1765. Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 89: 109, 113.

[2] ÒThe Liste.Ó Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina. No. 68. P. 28.

[3] Childs, St. Julien. Jan-Apr 1942. The Petit-GuŽrard Colony. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XLIII (1-2), pp. 1-17, 88-97. 

[4] Trapier, Paul. 1953. Notice of Ancestors and Relatives Paternal and Maternal.Ó Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 58: 30.

[5] From the Diary of the Rev. Paul Trapier, Great Grandson of Paul Trapier the Emigrant. Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 33:57.

[6] Gourdin, Virginia. 1986. Madeleine Chardon, of Tours, Touraine and her Family. Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina. No.  91: 84-85.

[7] Tesmoignages de LÕEglise de Threadneedle Street 1669-1789. Publications of the Huguenot Society of London. Vol. XXI. London: Spottiswoode & Co., Ltd. P. 93

[8] Hirsch, Arthur H. 1928. Huguenots of South Carolina, Durham: Duke University Press.. Page 173.

[9] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1755-1768, Books QQ-H-3. Vol. III. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P. 67.

[10] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. P.107.

[11] Smith, Henry A. M. Jan 1908. Charleston – the Original Plan and the Earliest Settlers. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. IX (1): 12-28.

[12] Hicks, Theresa M. 2003. Carolina Connections in the Colonial Period. Columbia: Peppercorn Publications, Inc. P. 156.

[13] Smith, Henry A. M. Jan 1908. Charleston – The Original Plan and the Earliest Settlers. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. IX (1): 12-28.

[14] Hicks, Theresa M. 2003. Carolina Connections in the Colonial Period. Columbia: Peppercorn Publications, Inc. P. 182.

[15] Gourdin, Virginia. 1986. Madeleine Chardon, of Tours, Touraine and her Family. Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina. No.  91: 84.

[16] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. P.107.

[17] Hirsch, Arthur H. 1928. Huguenots of South Carolina, Durham: Duke University Press.. Pp. 116-117.

[18] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. P. 194.

[19] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Pp. 249-250.

[20] Salley, A.S.Jr. Jan 1909. Abstracts from Records the Court of Ordinary. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine Vol. X (1): 140-141.

[21] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Pp. 85-86.

[22] Childs, St. Julien. Jan-Apr 1942. The Petit-GuŽrard Colony. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XLIII (1-2), pp. 1-17, 88-97.

[23] Gourdin, Virginia. 1986. ÒMadeleine Chardon of Tours, Touraine, and her Family,Ó Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 91. Page 85.

[24] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. 2003 reprint. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P. 97.

[25] Salley, A.S.Jr. Jan 1909. Abstracts from Records the Court of Ordinary. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine Vol. X (1): 88.

[26] Gourdin, Virginia. 1986. ÒMadeleine Chardon of Tours, Touraine, and her Family,Ó Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 91. Page 85.

[27] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P. 142.

[28] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P.75.

[29] Salley, A. S. Jr., ed., and R. Nicholas Olsberg, rev. and introduction 1973. Warrants for Land in South Carolina 1672-1711. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press for South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

Heitzler, Michael J. 2005. Goose Creek: A Definitive History. Charleston: History Press. Pages 218-220.

[30] Heitzler, Michael J. 2005. Goose Creek: A Definitive History. Charleston: History Press. Page 181.

[31] Heitzler, Michael J. 2005. Goose Creek: A Definitive History. Charleston: History Press. Page 164.

[32] Heitzler, Michael J. 2005. Goose Creek: A Definitive History. Charleston: History Press. Page 182.

[33] Maxyck, Katharine B. 1936. Of South Carolina Huguenots. Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina. No. 41. Pp. 45-48.

[34] Hicks, Theresa M., ed. 1998. South Carolina Indians Indian Traders and Other Ethnic Connections Beginning in 1670.  Spartanburg: Peppercorn Publications, Inc. Page 20.

Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P. 112.

[35] Hicks, Theresa M., ed. 1998. South Carolina Indians Indian Traders and Other Ethnic Connections Beginning in 1670.  Spartanburg: Peppercorn Publications, Inc Page 83.

[36] Ravenel, Beatrice St. Julien. 1992. Architects of Charleston. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press. Pages 13-14.

[37] Warren, Mary B., ed. 1977. South Carolina Jury Lists, 1718-1783. Danielsville GA: Heritage Papers. P. 55.

[38] South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research, Vol. I, Summer 1973, No. 3, p.129

[39] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P. 261.

[40] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P. 5.

[41] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P. 75.

[42] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha A. Simmons. Comp. and ed. 1960. Abstracts of the Wills of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. I. Columbia: R. L. Bryan Company.  P. 77.

[43] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P. 27.

[44] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P.24, 25.

[45] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P. 43.

[46] Hicks, Theresa M., ed. 1998. South Carolina Indians Indian Traders and Other Ethnic Connections Beginning in 1670.  Spartanburg: Peppercorn Publications, Inc Page 106.

[47] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha A. Simmons. Comp. and ed. 1960. Abstracts of the Wills of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. I. Columbia: R. L. Bryan Company.  Pp. 184-185.

[48] Hicks, Theresa M., ed. 1998. South Carolina Indians, Indian Traders, and Other Ethnic Connections Beginning in 1670. Spartanburg: The Reprint Company for Peppercorn Publications. Inc. Pp. 136-137.

[49] Transactions of the South Carolina Huguenot Society. 1905. No. 12:54.

[50] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha Aimar Simmons, ed. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. 1. Charlotte, N.C.: Observer Printing House, Inc. P. 248.

[51] Moore, Caroline T., Ed. 1964. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1740-1760. Columbia: R. L. Bryan. Page 15.

[52] Moore, Caroline T., Ed. 1964. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1740-1760. Columbia: R. L. Bryan. Page 25.

[53] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P. 358.

[54] Hicks, Theresa M., ed. 1998. South Carolina Indians, Indian Traders, and Other Ethnic Connections Beginning in 1670. Spartanburg: The Reprint Company for Peppercorn Publications. Inc. P. 22.

[55] Moore, Caroline T. 1978. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692-1721. Columbia: SCMAR. Page 328-329.

[56] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. 2003. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Page 118.

[57] Gourdin, Virginia. 1986. ÒMadeleine Chardon of Tours, Touraine, and her Family,Ó Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 91.

[58] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. 2003. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Pp. 245-246.

[59] Colonial Grants. S213019. Vol. 39, page 90, item 3. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[60] Colonial Plats. S213184. Vol. 2, Page 222. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[61] Colonial Grants. S213019. Vol. 2, page 294, item 3. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[62] Colonial Memorials. S111001. Vol. 14, Page 244, Item 2. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[63] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press, Inc. P. 16.

[64] Colonial Dames of America, Volume II, Records and Portraits. Lineages of Hereditary Society Members, 1600s-1900s. P. 640.

[65] Gourdin, Virginia. 1986. ÒMadeleine Chardon of Tours, Touraine, and her Family,Ó Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 91. Page 85.

Misc. Records of Charleston County, Vol. 52, pp. 175-177.

[66] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha Aimar Simmons, ed. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. 1. P. 34.

[67] Salley, A. S. Jr. Jul 1911. Abstracts from the Records of the Court of Ordinary of the Province of South Carolina, 17000-1712. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. XII (3). Pp. 148-149.

[68] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. P. 101.

[69]  Judgment Rolls. Series Number S136002. Box - 025B. Item - 0002A. Date: 1741-1742. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[70] Konopa, Leola Wilson. 1973. The Isaac Dubose family of South Carolina. Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 78. Columbia: R. L. Bryan Company. Pp. 112-113.

[71] Easterby, J. H. 1954. The Colonial Records of South Carolina: The Journal of the Commons House of Assembly September 14, 1742-January 27, 1744. Columbia: South Carolina Archives Department. Pp. 473-477.

[72] Salley, A.S.Jr. Jan 1909. Abstracts from Records the Court of Ordinary. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine Vol. X (1): 140-141.

[73] Salley, A. S. Jr., ed., and R. Nicholas Olsberg, rev. and introduction 1973. Warrants for Land in South Carolina 1672-1711. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press for South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[74] Moore, Caroline T. compiler and editor. 1978. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692-1721. Columbia: R. L. Bryan. P. 131.

[75] LDS Family History Library. Microfilms. International. Register, St. AndrewsÕs Parish, Jamaica, 1.291.699.

[76] Lach, Donald F. and Edwin J. Van Kley. 1992. Asia in the Making of Europe: A Century of Advance. Book 1: Trade, Missions, Literature. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Page 537.

[77] Boterblom, Kees. 2004 Early modern Dutch identity: Jan Janszoon Struijs and his three calamitous journeys. Paper presented at the 2004 CODART Symposium, Representation and regulation: 17th-century economics in the Dutch Republic. Amsterdam.

[78] Struys, John. 1684. The Voyages and Travels of John Struys through Italy, Greece, Muscovy, Tartary, Media, Persia, East-India, Japan, and other Countries in Europe, Africa and Asia . . . , translated by John Morrison, microfilm, London: Abel Sovalle.

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[80] Langley, Clara A. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. P. 6.

[81] Jamaican Family Search Research Library. Andrade, Jacob A. P. M. 1941. A Record of the Jews in Jamaica. Appendix ÒLÓ: A partial list of interments in various cemeteries. Jamaica.

[82] Baird, Charles Washington. 1885. History of the Huguenot Emigration to America. New York: Dodd Meade and Co.

[83] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P. 278.

[84] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P. 4.

[85] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P. 28.

[86] Van Ruymbeke, Bertrand. 2006. From New Babylon to Eden. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press. Page 77.

[87] Memorials. Series Number S111001. Volume 0003. Page 00051. Item 01. Date 1733/04/23. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[88] Moore, Caroline T., compiler and editor. Records of the Secretary of the Province of South Carolina 1692- 1721. Columbia: SCMAR. P. 10.

[89] Giessendanner Book of Record. Joop Giessendanner Transcription. http://www.xs4all.nl/~sail/orange/92-101.html.

[90] Rootsweb Archives. Georgia. Jefferson/Burke Counties, GA, Land Grants to Andrew Berryhill.

[91] Hicks, Theresa M., ed. 1998. South Carolina Indians Indian Traders and Other Ethnic Connections Beginning in 1670.  Spartanburg: Peppercorn Publications, Inc Page 106.

[92] Rootsweb Archives. Georgia. Richmond Co., GA Wills – Daniel Derizous.

[93] Hicks, Theresa M., ed. 1998. South Carolina Indians Indian Traders and Other Ethnic Connections Beginning in 1670.  Spartanburg: Peppercorn Publications, Inc Pp. 108.

[94] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 185.

[95] Colonial Plats. Series No.  S213184. Vol. 0001. Page 00057. Item 02. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[96] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. A List of Landowners in the Island of Jamaica Together with the number of acres each person possessed taken from The Quit Rent Books in the Year 1754.

[97] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. Fuertado, W. A. 1896. Official and Other Personages of Jamaica from 1655 to 1790 Compiled from Various Sources. Kingston.

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[103] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. A List of Landowners in the Island of Jamaica Together with the number of acres each person possessed taken from  The Quit Rent Books in the Year 1754.

[104] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. Monumental Inscriptions Kingston Cathedral Church.

[105] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. List of Sugar Plantations in the Parish of St. James, September 1774.

[106] Heitzler, Michael J. 2005. Goose Creek: A Definitive History. Charleston: History Press. Page 272.

[107] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. Anglin and Scarlett Family.

[108] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. Fuertado, W. A. 1896. Official and Other Personages of Jamaica from 1655 to 1790 Compiled from Various Sources. Kingston.

[109] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. Fuertado, W. A. 1896. Official and Other Personages of Jamaica from 1655 to 1790 Compiled from Various Sources. Kingston.

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[111] Series: S213003 Volume - 002I Page - 00010 Item - 00 Date: 1751/04/16 

Series: S213003 Volume - 002I Page - 00567 Item - 00 Date: 1751/05/28 

Series: S213003 Volume - 002I Page - 00153 Item - 01 Date: 1751/08/23 

Series: S213003 Volume - 002I Page - 00655 Item - 02 Date: 1752/10/13 

Series: S136002 Box - 035A Item - 0095A ignore - 00 Date: 1753 

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[113] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. A List of Landowners in the Island of Jamaica Together with the number of acres each person possessed taken from The Quit Rent Books in the Year 1754.

[114] Kingston Parish Registers 1722-1825, 1851-59, Marriages Volume I, Burials I & II.

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[119] Olsberg, R. Nicholas, compiler. 1973. ShipÕs Registers in the South Carolina Archives, 1734-1780. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. 74 (4): 253.

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[124] Salley, A.S.Jr. Jan 1909. Abstracts from Records the Court of Ordinary. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine Vol. X (1): 140-141.

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[128] Langley, Clara A. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. P. 50. Also, Series S372001, Vol. 00D0, Page 00092, Item 00, Date 1721-1730, South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[129] Holcomb, Brent H. 1977. Probate Records of South Carolina, Volume I: Index to Inventories 1746-1785. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 67.

[130] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha Aimar Simmons, ed. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. 1. Charlotte, N.C.: Observer Printing House, Inc. Pp. 129-130.

[131] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. Fuertado, W. A. 1896. Official and Other Personages of Jamaica from 1655 to 1790 Compiled from Various Sources. Kingston.

[132] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. Caribeanna Various families: Johnson.

[133] Jamaican Family Search Genealogy Research Library. Survey of Jamaica 1670.  St. AndrewÕs Parish.

[134] Salley, A.S.Jr. Jan 1909. Abstracts from Records the Court of Ordinary. South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine Vol. X (1): 140-141.

[135] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 75-76.

[136] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 71.

[137] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha Aimar Simmons, ed. Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. 1. Charlotte, N.C.: Observer Printing House, Inc. P. 185.

[138] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1755-1768. Vol. III. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 312, 313.

[139] Smith, Henry A. M. Jan 1908. Charleston – The Original Plan and the Earliest Settlers. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. IX (1): 12-28.

[140] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 49.

[141] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 27.

[142] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 166.

[143] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 67-68.

[144] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 163.

[145] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 305.

[146] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 133-134.

[147] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 233.s

[148] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. III. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 22.

[149] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 350.

[150] Hirsch, Arthur H. 1928. Huguenots of South Carolina, Durham: Duke University Press.. Page 116.

[151] Hicks, Theresa M. 2003. Carolina Connections in the Colonial Period. Columbia: Peppercorn Press. P. 174.

[152] Hicks, Theresa M. 2003. Carolina Connections in the Colonial Period. Columbia: Peppercorn Press. P. 174.

[153] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 122-123.

[154] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 162.

[155] Smith, Henry A. M. Jan 1908. Charleston – The Original Plan and the Earliest Settlers. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. IX (1): 12-28.

[156] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 61-62.

[157] Smith, Henry A. M. Jan 1908. Charleston – the Original Plan and the Earliest Settlers. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. IX (1): 22.

[158] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 105.

[159] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 266-267.

[160] Moore, Caroline T. and Agatha A. Simmons. Comp. and ed. 1960. Abstracts of the Wills of South Carolina 1670-1740. Vol. I. Columbia: R. L. Bryan Company.  P. 171.

[161] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page 80.

[162] Smith, Henry A. M. Jan 1908. Charleston – the Original Plan and the Earliest Settlers. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Vol. IX (1): 22.

[163] Langley, Clara A. 1983. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. I. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Pages 89, 185.

[164] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. II. Easley: Southern Historical Press. Page184.

[165] Trapier, Paul. 1953. Notice of Ancestors and Relatives Paternal and Maternal.Ó Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 58: 30.

[166]   Olsberg, R. Nicholas. Oct 1973. Ship Registers in the South Carolina Archives 1734-1780. South Carolina Historical Magazine. Vol. 74(4): 189-299.

[167] Colonial Grants. Series No. S213016. Vol. 002F. Page 00038. Item 00. Date 1751/11/06. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[168] Colonial Grants. Series No. 213016. Vol. 002G. Page 00025. Date: 1758/02/01. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[169] Release. Series Number S372001. Vol. 02V0. Page 00029. Date 1759-60. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[170] Hirsch, Arthur H. 1928. Huguenots of South Carolina, Durham: Duke University Press.. Pp. 21-22.

[171] Hirsch, Arthur H. 1928. Huguenots of South Carolina, Durham: Duke University Press.. P. 119.

[172] Hirsch, Arthur H. 1928. Huguenots of South Carolina, Durham: Duke University Press. p. 122.

[173] Salley, A. S. ed. 1932. Journals of the Commons House of Assembly of South Carolina for 1702. Columbia: Historical Commission of South Carolina. P. 53, 57.

[174] Lesser, Charles H. 1995. South Carolina Begins: The Records of a Proprietary Colony, 1663-1721. Columbia: South Carolina Department of Archives and History. P. 338.

[175] Porcher, Frederick A. 1887. Upper Beat of St. JohnÕs Berkeley. In A Contribution to the History of the Huguenots of South Carolina. New York: The Knickerbocker Press. Page 47.