The Eisenhuts

John “Hysenhoeds” had a plat surveyed for 200 acres adjacent the land of Peter Fauré on 17 Sep 1736.[1] He received a town lot in Orangeburgh at the same time, no. 264. However, the town lot was later certified for Simon Tyse instead.[2] The Eisenhut household led by Johannes Eisenhut had settled in a small Appenzell-St. Gall enclave that also included the Tobler, Forster, and Felder households.

The Charleston County Deed Book LL:344 shows that on 10 May 1751, Abraham Husenhood, laborer, & Mary, his wife, sold to Henry Felder, cordwainer, for 60 pounds the 200 acres originally granted to John Husenhood, “uncle of said Abraham.” Jacob Rumph and Alexander Maxwell were witnesses.

Abraham’s first grant petition:[3]

The Humble Pet’n of Abraham Heizenwood setting forth That he has been a Setler in this Province 12 or 13 years ago & hth in Family 4 Persons (that is to say) himself, his Wife & 2 Children & being desirous of Cultivating and Improving some of his Majesty’s Vacant Land prays for 200 acres in Orangeburgh Township & that he may have a Grant for the Same. The Prayer of the Petittion Granted.

Thus Abraham Eisenhut immigrated in 1735. Stammliste des Geschlechts der Eisenhut von Gais (Kanton Appenzell-Ausserrhoden by Werner Eisenhut-Blatter of St. Gallen, published in St. Gallen in 1988, gives the following family records that help to identify the members of the original Johannes Eisenhut household:

Johannes Eisenhut, b. 1.7.1685 d. 1742 “in Carolina.” This Johannes was the son of Hans (Johannes) Eisenhut b. 11.5.1662 and d. 22.1.1740, a councilman of Gais, and Barbara Sonderegger, b. 5.9.1664, m. 14.10.1683, and d. 26.2.1696. Johannes had a brother, Abraham, b. 22.9.1691 and d. 5.5.1726.

Johannes’ brother Abraham was the father of the Abraham Eisenhut who immigrated to South Carolina in 1735, and also of Abraham’s sister Anna, b. 22.5.1715, who immigrated also. The remaining members of their immediate family (as recorded in the Gais parish register), including their mother Cathrina Heim Eisenhut, b. 20.1.1688, m. 7.9.1718, and d. 27.4.1733, were dead by 1735. This accounts for the young people leaving for Carolina with their Uncle Johannes.

The Swiss parish records do not reveal the identity of Margaret Eisenhut, but her age and membership in this household point toward her being a daughter of the older Abraham Eisenhut and a sister of Orangeburgh settler Abraham Eisenhut. These were the four who made up the Johannes Eisenhut household in 1735: Johannes himself, his nephew Abraham, his niece Anna, and (probably his niece) Margaret Eisenhut.

Eisenhuts in Switzerland

Stammliste des Geschlechts der Eisenhut von Gais (Kanton Appenzell-Ausserrhoden traces the Orangeburg Eisenhut line back into the 15th century in Gais, Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CH.

Hans Eisenhut

occ. Landmann von Appenzell, Landvogt im Rheintal

d. aft 1475, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Ulrich Eisenhut

b. ca 1467, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

occ. Landammann von Appenzell

d. 1536, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Peter Eisenhut

b. ca 1502, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. aft 1563, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Uli Eisenhut

b. ca 1533, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

occ. Hauptmann von Gais

d. aft 1563, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Peter Eisenhut

b. ca 1556, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

occ. Kirchenpfleger in Gais

d. 14 Nov 1629, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& Barbara Hofstetter

 

Hans Eisenhut

b. ca 1585

occ. Hauptmann von Gais

d. 13 May 1638, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& G. Barbara Mösli

b. 1614, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 29 Jul 1638, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Hanns (Johannes) Eisenhut

b. 4 Mar 1616, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 14 Jan 1659, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& Elsbeth Kern

b. 1615

d. 26 Aug 1693, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

m. 14 May 1636, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Hans Eisenhut

b. 3 Feb 1639, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

occ. Ratsherr von Gais

d. 29 May 1709, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& Anna Haas

b. 22 Nov 1640, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 29 Mar 1716, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

m. 17 Jun 1660

 

Hans Eisenhut*

b. 11 May 1662, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 22 Jan 1740, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& Barbel (Barbara) Sonderegger

b. 5 Sep 1664, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 26 Feb 1696, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

m. 14 Oct 1683, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Johannes (John) Eisenhood

b. 1 Jul 1685, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 1742, Orangeburg, Orangeburg, SC

 

Abraham Eisenhut*

b. 22 Sep 1691, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& Anna Schlaepfer

 

Anna Eisenhut

b. 22 Apr 1715, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. Orangeburg, SC

 & John Farree

 

Barbel Eisenhut

b. 10 May 1716, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 26 Jun 1717, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Elsbeth Eisenhut

b. 2 Jun 1717, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 21 Nov 1718, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Abraham Eisenhut*

b. 22 Sep 1691, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& Catharina Heim

.

Johannes Eisenhut

b. 23 Jun 1719, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 25 Jun 1719, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Barbel Eisenhut

b. 23 Jun 1719, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 3 Jul 1719, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Abraham Eisenhut

b. 29 May 1720, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. aft 1772, Orangeburgh, SC

& Mary Dattwyler

 

Johannes Eisenhut

b. 8 Nov 1721, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 d. 31 Dec 1721, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Johannes Eisenhut

b. 27 Oct 1723, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Johannes Eisenhut

b. 18 Apr 1725, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 14 Jul 1725, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Margaret Eisenhut (Hazelwood)

b. ? , Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 1754, Orangeburgh District, SC

& Joseph Dukes

b. ca 1720

d. ca 1768, Orangeburgh District, SC

 

Ursula Eisenhut

b. 10 Jan 1694, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 23 May 1767, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& Hans Gingg

m. 14 Oct 1722, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Barbel Eisenhut

b. 22 Feb 1696, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 24 Feb 1696, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

 

Hans Eisenhut*

b. 11 May 1662, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

d. 22 Jan 1740, Gais, Appenzell, Switzerland

& Anna Buff

b. 4 Feb 1696, 9 Apr 1732

m. 9 Apr 1717

Eisenhuts in Carolina

There is no evidence that Johannes Eisenhut married.

Margaret Eisenhut married Joseph Duke and was the mother of (at least) two of his children.

Abraham Eisenhut married Mary Dattwyler. A 26 Apr 1754 memorial regarding other land sold to Henry Felder identifies Abraham and Mary Isenhood, along with Jacob and Ann Rumph and Daniel Bohman as ‘all heirs at law to the said Melchior Tatweeler deceased Aug 1771.” [4] His daughter Anna married Jacob Rumph, daughter Mary married Abraham Isenhood, and daughter Barbara married Jacob Bowman.

John “Fairy” was married to Ann “Yssenhut” on 5 Feb 1743 by Rev. John Giessendanner.[5] John Farree [Holcomb lists “Farrer” but examination of the handwritten document confirms “Farree”] petitioned the same day as the first of Abraham’s petitions, also indicating 13 years residence in the province, and requesting 300 acres in Orangeburgh Township for himself, his wife (Anna Eisenhut) and four children. Farree’s initial grant was approved, but later (1757) was granted not to Farree but to Joseph Dukes. Giessendanner recorded in his Book of Record that on 5 Feb 1740 he married John Fairy to Ann Yssenhut.

The timing of his arrival suggests that John Farree was among the 1735 Swiss settlers. The closest Swiss equivalent to the name Farree is “Furi”, which appears as early as the mid-16th century in the Canton of Bern, and was sometimes anglicized as Ferry, Ferri, or Farry. However, the name is rare, and John Farree did not in fact obtain land in the Swiss township, but below it, which argues against his having been one of the Swiss, and in favor of his having been from an earlier Carolina family.

Abraham Eisenhut’s Grants

Petitions for subsequent grants were made by Abraham, citing three additional children on 4 Mar 1754[6] and an additional four children on 5 Feb 1767.[7] These petitions were granted on 21 May 1757 and on 30 0ct 1767.[8] 

In 1748 Abraham Heizenwood (Heisenhood, Isenhood, etc.) was surveyed 200 acres bounded on the northwest by Joseph Hasfort’s land, and on the southwest by John Hearn’s land.[9] His petition to the Council, read 4 March 1747/48, indicated that his household consisted of himself and his wife, plus two children, none previously granted land. He further explained that he had been a settler in the province for 12-13 years at that time.[10] He therefore arrived in South Carolina in about 1735-36. He was among the substantial contingent of German-Swiss settlers in 1735.[11] He lived with his uncle John prior to receiving his own grants.

A 1757 plat for 100 acres granted to Andrew Frederick indicates that the property was bounded SW by Abraham Heizelwood’s land, and NE by land laid out to Bernard Leibender.[12] This property was south of Rowesville and west of the road from Rowesville to Cattle Creek Church.

A memorial certified in 1758 states: [13]

“South Carolina. A memorial exhibited by Abraham Heisenwood [Hazelwood], to be registered in the office of his Majesty’s Auditor General, pursuant to the Acts of Assembly . . . Of a tract of 300 acres of land, situate lying and being in Berkley County, originally granted by his Majesty King George the Second, on the 26th day of March 1756 … “

In 1758-59, Abraham Heizenwood also purchased 300 acres of land in Orangeburgh Township from George Restly and wife.[14]

A 1758 plat indicates that a 100-acre tract granted to Michael Kolb was bounded on the NW by lands formerly laid out to Abraham Heizelwood, now the property of Erick Johnson.[15]A memorial by Henry Felder references 219 acres bounded NE and NW of SW on Joseph Duke, NE on Henry Felder, SE on George Wilderick and Abraham Hinsenhood, all other sides vacant. This survey was certified 7 Sep 1772, and the tract was granted 26 Sep 1772 to Felder.[16] The Joseph Dukes land in question is the 200 acre tract that he retained.

Abraham Hazelwood bought 200 acres of land from Silas Canady in a lease and release transaction: “Lease & release. 14 & 15 Feb 1772. Silas Canaday of Colleton County, SC, and Candice his wife to Abraham Hazelwood of same, for £50 of SC money, 200 acres on waters of Edisto granted to said Silas Canaday 15 May 1770. Silas Canaday (LS), Condice Canaday (+) (LS), Wit.: Jno Cuningham, Abraham Hazelwood, Andrew Frederick. Proved by the oath of Andrew Frederick before Christopher Rowe, 3 Aug 1772. Recorded 25 July 1774.” [17] This is the second instance of the use of the spelling “Hazelwood.”

Abraham Eisenhut, Church and State

Abraham Eisenhut took a very active interest in the early churches in Orangeburgh. In 1749 “Abra. Ussenhut” was a party to the petition to ordain Rev. Giessendanner in the Church of England.[18]

Later, Abraham was involved in the establishment of the Frederician Church on Cattles Creek. A summary of the documentation:

Deed Book R-5, 48-53; Lease & Release. 28 & 29 Sept 1778, Jacob Kerner and George Sommers of Berkley County, Orange Parish, SC, planters, to Andrew Frederick, Capt. John Clayton, Sebastian Funties, Joseph Tucker, Nicholaus Zorn, William Clayton, Alexander & Adam Syfrett, Izam Clayton, Abraham & Isaac Hazelwood, Richard Berrie [sic: Ferrie], William Ferrie &c. Elders, Wardens, & Members of the Protestant Congregation of Frederician Church on Cattles Creek of the above mentioned county, parish and state, for £5 SC money, two acres on Cattle's Creek bounding on all sides by land of said Jacob Kerner & George Sumers. Jacob Kerner (LS), Geo: Summers (LS), Wit: Andrew Wirosdick, John Fry, Thomas Cliff. Proved in Orange County SC, by the oath of Andrew Wirosdick 14 Feb 1786 before T. [presumably H.] Felder, J.P. Recorded 1 Mar 1786.

Frederick purchased land from William Aldridge on 21 & 22 Dec 1767 (Deed Book Y-3, pp. 442-446), recorded immediately following the recording by Henry Felder of the 300 acres he'd purchased which had been originally surveyed for Joseph Dukes. Andrew Frederick's purchase was on Tylo Creek of the Edisto, bounding SW on Joseph Hasfort, NE on Joseph Dukes (the 200-acre grant). In 1773, minister Fredericks got a plat adjacent to the land he'd previously purchased. It still bounded on Dukes, but the Dukes in question was the younger generation by then. Church elder Alexander Syfrett also got a plat in 1773, chose the same immediate neighborhood, also bounded on Michal [sic] Dukes. The 1774 Mouzon map shows Hartzog, Clayton, Hasfort and Linder all lined up in a row below Cattell's Creek, on the road right where Mills places the Frederick property in 1820.

The people who signed the church incorporation document in 1788 were:

Frederick Daser, A.M. V.D.M., Heinrick Himler, George Hinckel (by X), Fridrick Knobel (by X), Andreas Fridrick, Tobias Hartzog, Henry Hutto, Christoph Metz, Wm. Road (by X), Peter Frederick, George Miller, Paul Patrick, Jacob Zorn, Philip Carn (by X), David Crum, William Road Ju., James Berry, Michl Drehr (by X), Jo Sommer (by X), H Felder, Christian Cramer (by X), Joseph Tucker, Alexander Syfritt (by X), Jacob Ott, Nicholas Zorn, Allard Mayars, Fred Felder, Philip Lambright, John Waymer.

In 1778/79 Abraham “Isenhood” appears as one of the 29 Grand Jurors below Orangeburg in “The Jury Lists of South Carolina, 1778-1779, Orangeburg District, Page 66. This reflects ownership of considerable taxable property. No member of the Duke or Dukes family is listed as grand juror, although Michael “Duck” appears as a Petit Juror below Orangeburgh in the same lists, page 69. This was Michael Dukes, oldest son of Joseph Dukes.

Abraham Eisenhut’s Family

On 14 Nov 1747, Abraham “Yessenhoot” , born 29 Sep 1747, the son of Abraham and Mary Eisenhut was baptized, with Jacob Rumph, Peter Hugg, and Anna Dattwyler (later to marry Jacob Rumph), sponsors.[19]

In 1753 Joseph served as a baptismal sponsor for his baby brother-in-law:

[1753] On Sunday Febr. 18th in Orangeburgh Church. Isaac and Jacob, twins, sons of Abraham and Mary Yssenhut; born December. 26th 1752. Susceptr. for Isaac: Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder and Hans Balzinger. Susceptr. for Jacob [Yssenhut]; Jacob Rumph, Joseph Duke and Mary, wife of Hans Balzinger.[20]

The name “Eisenhut” is now often given as “Whisenhunt.” Jacob Rumph, who served as a sponsor for Jacob with Joseph Duke, was married to Anna Dattwyler, daughter of Melchior Dattwhiler and sister of Mary Dattwyler. Joseph was of course married to Margaret “Hazelwood.”

On 1 Jul 1750, Giessendanner baptised Johannes, son of Abraham and Mary Issenhut; born May 31st. Sponsors were Peter Hug, John Inabnet, and Agnes wife of George Giessendanner, Jr.[21]

On Sunday Dec 15 1754 Giessendanner baptised Maria, daughter of Abraham and Mary Yssenhut, born 3 Oct 1754. Sponsors were Henry and Mary-Elizabeth Felder, and Margaret, wife of Christopher Rowe.[22]

On Thursday, 7 Apr 1757, Giessendanner baptised John, son of Abraham and Mary Yssenhut, born 1 Mar 1757. Sponsors were Barnard Lebennder, John and Margaret Inabnet.[23]

Abraham and Mary were frequently baptismal sponsors for others, as well. On Sunday 28 Oct 1750, Abraham Yssenhut, Samuel Davis, and the wife of Elias Snell were sponsors for the baptism of Isaac, son of Jacob and Barbara Brunzon.[24] (Barbara Brunzon was born Barbara Fuster, and later married Joseph Dukes after the death of Margaret “Hazelwood” Dukes. On 27 Jan 1751 Abraham was sponsor for the baptism of Abraham, son of Jonathan and Martha Brunson, along with Isaac Cleaton and Sirrah Hardman.[25] On 2 Aug 1752 Abraham was sponsor for Jacob, son of Jacob Rumph and Anna Dattwyler Rumph, his sister-in-law, along with Barbara Bowman, his other sister-in-law.[26] On 26 Dec 1753, Mary sponsored Mary Margaret, daughter of Hans George and Rosina Russel.[27] On Sunday 1 May 1757 Abraham sponsored Abraham, son of Henry and Mary Elizabeth Felder.[28] On 25 Dec 1757 he sponsored John, son of Barnard and Mary Apollonia Lebennder.[29] On 25 Jun 1758 Mary sponsored Mary Magdalene, daughter of Jacob and Anna Wannamaker. On 1 Apr 1759 Mary sponsored John, illegitimate son of William Pendarvis and Catharina, wife of Thomas Puckridge.[30]

Abraham Isenhood and Mary Dattwyler Eisenhut’s children, then, included:

Abraham, born 29 Sep 1747

Johannes, born 31 May 1750

Jacob and Isaac, born 26 Dec 1752

Maria, born 3 Oct 1754

John, born 7 Apr 1757

This total accounts for only six of the nine children mentioned by Abraham in testimony to the South Carolina Council in land petitions. In addition, Elizabeth “Hazelwood” is said to have married George Summers, and could be another child of Abraham and Mary Eisenhut. Also, a Peter Whisenhunt was a loyalist and a member of Col. John Fisher’s Regiment, Orangeburgh Militia, Captain Christian House’s Company, in 1780, and is probably another child of Abraham Eisenhut. John and Jacob “Hazelwood” were also listed in the same unit.[31]

A John “Hazewood” is listed as having served under Henderson in the same Orangeburgh-based Revolutionary War unit as Thomas Hazelwood.[32] He is identified as having signed up for Col. Huger’s 5th Regiment 19 Mar 1776 and having been discharged 30 Nov 1777. This was probably Johannes b. 1750.

An Abraham Hazelwood, probably Abraham b. 1747, is recorded as having served in the Revolutionary War.[33].

In 1820 “Georg Whisehunt” was among those petitioning for payment for militia service near Beaufort during the war of 1812 (General Assembly Petition 1820 No. 87), along with “Isaac Docks”, “Thomas Ducks”, “Micael Ducks”, “Federick Cyfret”, and others. [34]

 

This document is copyright © 2007 by Lynn Teague. All rights reserved. The copyright must appear on all copies.

 

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[1] Colonial Plats. Vol. 9, page 494, item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[2] Colonial Plats. Vol. 11, page 562, item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[3] Holcomb, Brent, H. 1996. Petitions for Land from the South Carolina Council Journals. Volume I: 1734/5-1748. Columbia: SCMAR. Page 309.

[4] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Colonial Memorials. Vol. 12. Page 63.

               See also Colonial Plats Vol. 19, p.337; Colonial Grants Vol. 34, p. 532.

[5] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War. Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 107.

[6] Holcomb, Brent, H. 1998. Petitions for Land from the South Carolina Council Journals, Vol. IV: 1754-1756. Columbia: SCMAR. PageAGE 31.

[7] Holcomb, Brent, H. 1999. Petitions for Land from the South Carolina Council Journals, Vol. VI: 1766-1770. Columbia: SCMAR. PAGE 54.

[8] Colonial Grants. Vol. 7. Page 202. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

Colonial Plats. Vol. 9. Page 107. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

Colonial Grants. Vol. 15. Page 117. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

Colonial Memorials. Vol. 9. Page 411. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[9] Colonial Plats. Vol. 4, page 429, item 2. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[10] Holcomb, Brent, H. 1996. Petitions for Land from the South Carolina Council Journals. Volume I: 1734/5-1748. Columbia: SCMAR. Page 309.

[11] Waters, Margaret. 2002. A Preliminary Study of the colonial Landowners of Orangeburgh Township, SC, 1733-1749. Savannah GA: Margaret Waters.

[12] Colonial Plats. Vol. 6, page 360, item 2. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[13] Memorials, Vol. 7, page 174, item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[14] Colonial Deeds. Vol. 2T0, page 164. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

Memorials. Vol. 12, page 63, item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[15] Colonial Plats. Vol. 6, page 385, item 2. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[16] Memorials, Vol. 11, page 515, item 2. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[17] Holcomb, Brent H. 1993. Charleston Deed Book K-4, pages 360-365. In "South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1773-1778: Books F-4 through X-4." Columbia: SC Mar. Page 67.

[18] “Petition of Citizens of Orangeburgh Township in behalf of Rev. John Giessendanner, 1749. The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. January-April 1923. Vol. XXIV, No1. P. 50.

[19] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 105.

[20] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 136.

[21] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 124.

[22] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 151.

[23] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 169.

[24] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 125.

[25] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 127.

[26] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 133.

[27] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 142-143.

[28] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 170.

[29] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 173.

[30] Giessendanner Records. In Salley, A.S., Jr. 1898. The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War, Orangeburg, S.C.; reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994. Page 184.

[31] Clark, Murtie June. 1981. Loyalists in the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War. Vol. I: official Rolls of Loyalists Recruited from North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, and Louisiana. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.). Pages 199, 207.

[32] Continental Regiments 26 (Roll 16, M853). South Carolina Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[33] Stub Indent T5, AA-3483. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[34] “1820 Petition of Persons in Orangeburgh Parish.” Spring 1984. OGS Newsletter. Vol. 1, No. 12. Page 57.