Joseph’s Land Grants

The Tylo Branch Grant

On 1 Nov 1757 Joseph Dukes petitioned the South Carolina Council for 200 acres “on the Edistoe River or waters thereof.”[1] On 16 Nov 1757 Joseph Dukes was granted “Two Hundred Acres on the North side of the North Fork of Edisto River partly on a Branch called Tylo Branch in Colleton County bounded South Westward part on Vacant Land and part on Land laid out to William Aldridge, South Eastward on Vacant Land, North Eastward part on Vacant Land and part on Land formerly Surveyed for John Farree, North Westward on Vacant Land.[2] This is north of modern Branchville, SC. The early road that ran from that area north to Orangeburg crossed, as did “Tylo” or Tyler Branch, a tributary of what is called “Betty Branch” on current USGS quad sheets. Joseph Hasfort held land on the opposite side of Aldridge’s land.[3]

On 21 & 22 Dec, 1767, L & R, William (his mark) Aldridge (Oldridge), planter, & Agnes (her mark) his wife, to Andrew Fredrick, planter, both of Berkeley County, for 272 pounds currency, 300 acres in Berkeley County on Tylo Creek, a branch of North Edisto River, bounding SouthWest on Joseph Harsfort; NorthEast on Joseph Dukes; … Wit: Henry Fielder [Felder?], Daniel Linder; Before Christopher Rowe, J.P.; Recorded 9 Apr 1772 by George Davidson, Pro. Register.

Joseph Dukes’ grants were confirmed by a memorial of 2 May 1767. The Tylo Branch property was described as a “Plantation or Tract of 200 acres of Lands in Colleton County bounded SWward part on Vacant Lands and part on Lands laid out to William Aldridge, SE on vacant Land NEward part on Vacant Land and part on Land Surveyed for John Farree and Eward on Vacant Land, granted 19 Sep 1758 to this memorialist . . . “ [4] This property appears to be that immediately north of the western portion of Joseph Dukes’ other parcel, which he retained.

A 1757 plat for 100 acres granted to William Aldridge describes the land as “bounded SW on land formerly laid out to Joseph Hasfort, NE to Joseph Dukes and vacant lands, and the other sides vacant.”[5] This land is referenced in many subsequent grants, memorials, and plats.

An 18 May 1767 memorial by William Aldridge refers to 300 acres situated on the tributary of the North Edisto, Tylo Creek, “bounded to the SWward by Land formerly laid out for Joseph Hasforth to the NEward by Joseph Dukes and on all other sides by vacant Land.”.[6]

A 22 Dec 1767 memorial for Andrew Frederick refers to 500 acres land in Berkeley County on a branch of Edisto river called Tylo Creek bounded to the SW by land formerly laid out for Joseph Hasfort, to the NE by Joseph Dukes and on all other sides by vacant land. This property originally was granted 7 May 1767 to William Aldridge and was sold to Frederick through lease and release.[7]

Grant Adjacent George Haig’s Land

A second grant to Joseph Dukes, dated 6 Dec 1758, was for “Three Hundred Acres of land in Berkley County (Surveyed the Twenty fifth March One Thousand Seven Hundred Forty-Eight for John Farree) bounded North westward on George Haigs and Vacant lands.” [8] The 300-acre tract had been surveyed for Farree on a plat dated 7 Mar 1748.[9] No petition to the South Carolina Council in the name of Joseph Dukes has been identified for this land.

A memorial describes the property as “a Plantation or Tract of three hundred acres of land in Berkley County bounded on NWward by George Haig and vacant Lands and on all other Sides on vacant Land Granted the 8 May 1758 to the memorialist.”[10] (George Haig was a well-known Indian trader who was captured by the Nottowaga and killed in 1748.[11])

A deed dated 3 and 4 Oct 1758 from Jethro Mannings and his wife Rosena to Reynolds McDaniel, planter, transferred Berkeley County property that bounded south on Joseph Duke’s land.[12]

Joseph’s grant for 300 acres was subsequently sold. A15 May 1772 memorial by Henry Felder traced the history of property held by him, as follows: “A plantation or tract of land containing 300 acres situate in Berkeley County . . . Originally Granted the 8 day of May 1758 to Joseph Dukes at the [illegible] pro money per 100 acres and by him and Barbara his Wife Sold and Conveyed to Andrew Govan & by him to Ronald McDonald Since deceased.[13] Andrew Govan lived in the Rowesville area at the St. George or Oak Grove Plantation, eight miles south of the town of Orangeburg.[14] Oak Grove is immediately north of Rowesville.

A 1771 deed of land from John Fisher as executor of the will of Ronald McDonald to Henry Felder references 300 acres land originally granted to Joseph Dukes and later sold to Andrew Govan, who in turn sold to McDonald.[15]

On 7 Sep 1772 Henry Felder’s plat for a 729 acre tract was surveyed. It is described as situated on the waters of the North Fork of the Edisto River, bounded NE and NW of SW on land laid out to Joseph Dukes, to the NE on Henry Felder’s lands, to the SE on George Wilderick’s Land, and Abraham Hisenhood’s lands, all other directions vacant.[16]

A 23 Nov 1772 memorial by Henry Felder, for 271 acres of his lands, references land in Berkeley County on the north fork of the Edisto bounded NW on Abraham Hiselwoods, SE and SW on George Strathen [Strothers?], SE on Peter Leigh, SE on Paul Johnston, SE on William Aldridge, NE on Michael Dukes and other sides on Felders Land. This survey was certified 5 Sep 1772. The same memorial references 219 acres situated as above bounded NE and NW of SW on Joseph Duke, NE on Henry Felder, SE on George Wilderick and Abraham Hinsenhood [Eisenhut], all other sides vacant. This survey was certified 7 Sep 1772, and both were granted 26 Sep 1772 to Felder.[17]

The Manning Lease

SC Deed Book Y-3, pp. 275-280, 3 & 4 Oct 1758, L&R. Jethro Manning, laborer, & Rosena (her mark) his wife, to Reynolds McDaniel, planter, for 5 shillings [Note: this was the standard amount for a one-year lease, rather than for a permanent sale], 200 a. in Berkley Co. bounding S on Joseph Duke; E on Dorothy Burner; N & W on vacant land. Witnesses: George Ulrich, Capt. John Amacher, John George Unger. Before Lewis Golsan, J.P. on 17 Nov 1770. Recorded 24 Feb 1772 by George Davidson, Pro. Register. Jethro Manning’s will is recorded in the Charleston Will Book 11 (1767-71), p. 56.

 

This document is copyright © 2007 by Lynn Teague. All rights reserved. The copyright must appear on all copies.

 

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[1] Holcomb, Brent H. 1998. Petitions for Land from the South Carolina Council Journals. Vol. V: 1757-1765. Columbia: SCMAR. Page 15.

[2] Royal Grants, Vol. 8, page 428. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[3] Colonial Plats, Vol. 6, page 307, Item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[4] Memorials, Vol. 14, page 31, item 3. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[5] Colonial Plats. Vol. 6, page 307, item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[6] Memorials, Vol. 9, page 239, item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[7] Memorials, Vol. 11, page 227, item 2. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[8] Royal Grants, Vol. 8, page 298. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[9] Colonial Plats. Vol. 4 , page 429, item 02 South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[10] Memorials, Vol. 14, page 31, item 3. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[11] Hicks, Theresa M. 1998. South Carolina Indians, Indian Traders, and Other Ethnic Connections Beginning in 1670. Spartanburg: Peppercorn Publications and The Reprint Company. Pages 35-36.

[12] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. IV: 1767-1773, Books I-3 - E-4. Easely: Southern History Press. Page 230.

[13] Memorials, Vol. 11, page 228, item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[14] Culler, Daniel Marchant. 1995. Orangeburgh District 1768-1868: History and Records. Spartanburg: The Reprint Company.

[15] Langley, Clara A. 1984. South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772. Vol. IV: 1767-1773, Books I-3 - E-4. Easely: Southern History Press. Page 236.

[16] Colonial Plats, Vol. 15, page 102, item 1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

[17] Memorials, Vol. 11, page 515, item 2. South Carolina Department of Archives and History.